Nova Scotia Fishing Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi there again i just got my hands on a fly rod that belonged to my brother in-law before he passed away.
the rod has some writing on it that i took a picture of (not sure if i can attach a pic or not)
but here it is.
Shakespeare alpha-x
graphite
act.#7/8 line
FY 1350 8'6"(2.55M)
glass


now keep in mind that I'm looking to learn the art of fly fishing this year and have never done it before ,I'm looking to mainly fish for the elusive trout in rivers and lakes. what is the best line and gear setup for me ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
I would pick up a rio gold 8wt wff...$70 on ebay delivered. Go with the 8 instead of the 7 so it will load your rod a bit easier. This will also help in learning to roll cast, which is a very important in the world of small stream fly fishing where there is sometimes no backcast room. The rio gold is also 2 tone. Front head is olive and the rest of the line is yellow. This color transition will tell you where your rod will load the best(most of the time) especially when roll casting. If $70 bucks is a bit too high, try a cortland 444 in the same weight. I havent priced one of those but they r a bit cheaper. The rio line also is super slick and flies through the guides. The cheaper lines arent as smooth and create a bit more friction when the line shoots through the guides. You can also mark your line if you get a single color line with a black marker where the head stops and the running line starts. This will be a reference for casting and knowing where the line loads the rod best. Hope this helps. Good luck line shopping. There r lots of good lines that r cheaper than the rio. Thats just what i use and recomend them highly. Oh ya, stay away from those walmart superfly lines. They r cheap for a reason.

Campbell
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
i agree with jcampbell, the walmart lines r junk, i know a guy who hooked a fish and the line broke before the tippet, you know who u r, tell me again why u buy that line?? yea rio is the way to go, they have a line for every species u are after, they make a cheaper series of lines called the mainstream, they come in trout, bass and salt water tapers. i think they run around 40 bucks. but don't leave out other brands like SA, cortland, airflow ect. all good lines
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
Bambam-
I am going to try to explain something a bit technical to you, but bear with this and you'll see why I am suggesting something.
Older fly rods had two weights marked on them - such as yours - and generally they were for weight forward lines and double taper. That is - the first number, in your case 7,(out of the 7/8) was for a Double Taper line, and the 8 would be for a Weight Forward taper. This is because while the first 30 feet of a fly line is identical in these two configurations, after 30 feet, the DT is heavier and so you should use a lighter line (the 7) . Added to this is that the Shakespeare is a moderate rod to begin with - that is it has a fairly slow action. Because of both of these features of the rod, you should consider either a 7 wgt double taper for sure, or if you are going with a Weight forward line you could use an 8, but it will make the rod cast slow. If you are a bigger guy, and/or have a quick casting stroke, you may wnat a 7 to speed up the rod.
I might suggest you buy an inexpensive line to try out, or even better would be to get some friends together with a 7 and another with an 8 line and reel and try them out. You will find the wight on such a rod will make quite a difference.
Hope that helps,
Bill
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
767 Posts
Bambam-
I am going to try to explain something a bit technical to you, but bear with this and you'll see why I am suggesting something.
Older fly rods had two weights marked on them - such as yours - and generally they were for weight forward lines and double taper. That is - the first number, in your case 7,(out of the 7/8) was for a Double Taper line, and the 8 would be for a Weight Forward taper. This is because while the first 30 feet of a fly line is identical in these two configurations, after 30 feet, the DT is heavier and so you should use a lighter line (the 7) . Added to this is that the Shakespeare is a moderate rod to begin with - that is it has a fairly slow action. Because of both of these features of the rod, you should consider either a 7 wgt double taper for sure, or if you are going with a Weight forward line you could use an 8, but it will make the rod cast slow. If you are a bigger guy, and/or have a quick casting stroke, you may wnat a 7 to speed up the rod.
I might suggest you buy an inexpensive line to try out, or even better would be to get some friends together with a 7 and another with an 8 line and reel and try them out. You will find the wight on such a rod will make quite a difference.
Hope that helps,
Bill
Hi Bill;

I fish WFF line mostly, but sometimes WFI slo-sink in lakes. Assuming you only have one rod, would that difference affect preferred line wt.? Also, does wind make enough difference to make you change line wts.? I have heard that casting into a wind is easier with a lighter weight.

Thanks,

chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thank you for the replies for sure and yes i'm a bigger guy (6'& 300 lbs) so the #7 double taper line sounds good . now does the color make any differance ? i've noticed bright yellows,greens and even dark browns.
what about leader and backing ? length ect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
From my experience the color of the fly line makes no difference to the fish just the user. Sometimes when Im fishing in more shaded areas or murkier water I find I am able to see the yellow and white fly lines better then the green or brown.

As for backing it really depends on the reel size to determine how much you can put on. Unless you plan on targeting large species you wont need over 100 yards of backing.

For the leader I always use a 4 or 6 lb tapered(CT sells crystal river). Most common length is about 1.5 times the length of your fly rod. Then I tie on about 2 feet of tippet( I use 2 lb for trout)

Good luck out there
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
Hi Bill;

I fish WFF line mostly, but sometimes WFI slo-sink in lakes. Assuming you only have one rod, would that difference affect preferred line wt.? Also, does wind make enough difference to make you change line wts.? I have heard that casting into a wind is easier with a lighter weight.

Thanks,

chuck
Hi Chuck-
The sinking part won't effect the loading of the rod - a 7 wgt is a 7 wgt, sinking or not (just FYI, they get the weight by weighing the first 30 feet of the line in grams so all 7 wgt. lines are theoretically the same). What a weighted line will do is load the rod more when you pull it back against the water flow, as more of the line is in contact with the water. This doesn't effect your casting though (or shouldn't) as you need to bring the line to the surface, then cast.
A lighter line might be easier to cast into the wind, or might not (nice answer right?) Here's why - a lighter line will not load the rod as much and so it makes it feel like the rod is "faster" or less flexed. Normally this means that one can cast a bit further and quicker as the rod is loaded less and so reponds more quickly. This would give you a theoretical advantage into the wind. However, what many people do not understand is that fly lines are matched more to the fly you are casting than one suspects. So, if you are trying to throw a #2 bomber in a salmon situation, a 7 will work, but into the wind, a heavier line would be an advantage. Of course in your single rod situation , because the heavier line will load the rod more, you may not be able to cast as far, but into the wind that may not matter much.
This can work in the extremes. I was fishing in Florida a few years back, and was using a 9 and casting a largeish tarpon fly (about a 2/0 if I remember correctly). The wind was howling when we got out in a bay chasing a couple of fish, and the guide told me to switch rods with him, and he handed me his 12 wgt. It sure did cut through the wind, but it felt like casting a telephone pole. After a short bit of this, he suggested we go back into the mangroves and look for snook - and I agreed quickly, because back there, much less wind and I could go back to a 7 wgt rod. Besides, snook are a blast.
Hope that helps,
Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
thank you for the replies for sure and yes i'm a bigger guy (6'& 300 lbs) so the #7 double taper line sounds good . now does the color make any differance ? i've noticed bright yellows,greens and even dark browns.
what about leader and backing ? length ect.
Hi there-
Yes, I would go with a 7 wgt in your situation - DT is great because you can reverse it and get twice the wear out of it. A WF is good once you get to the point where you want to get longer casts, but I'll bet you'll like a 7 wgt on that rod anyway by the time this matters to you.
Colour should not matter - think about it, if you have your leader on there (anywhere from 7 to 12 feet depending on species and situation), the last thing you would want to do is put a visible line anywhere near the fish.
I personally like high visibility lines such as Trouter menioned so I can see what I am doing, and as I get older, I find I need all the help I can get in that department!
Backing is used to give you a cushion so that if a fish takes you through your line, you've got backup, but also to load the reel properly with the line. Old Guide's trick (no ageist comments please) - wind your fly line on the reel, then tie (loosely, because you're going to undo this) your backing on and wind until the line is about 1/4 to 1/2 inch below the reel's rim. This will show you how much backing you need - strip it all out, coiling it loosely, including the fly line - and then put the backing back on and then the fly line. Or you can go by what the reel's box says - usually something like 7 wgt line and x many feet of backing, 6 wgt and x feet, etc.
Leader depends more on species than anything else - long, light leaders for spooky trout and small flies, shorter heavier leaders for larger flies and less spooky or more aggressive fish. Most leader packages list the use. buy some tippett material that is the same weight as the leader's and you can replace the tip section quite a few times before you'll have to buy a new leader.
Hope that helps,
Bill
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top