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I guess my previous reply to this message was deleted because it was not "POLITICALLY CORRECT"!!!! LOL

Anyhow, there is ONLY one solution to the problem! You must eliminate the demand for these fish by the markets that drive the commercial exploitation of these fish. Until that happens, you are going have people who supply the demand, either legally, or illegally! No restrictions on the take of these fish will help with eliminating the demand, all it will do is drive the price higher, and the few that are already exploiting the fishery will just make more $$$$$$$$$.
 

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With respect,I feel that I must disagree, to a point. At one time, right here in Nova Scotia we had a flourishing market in undersized,illegal, or "Tinker" lobsters. A lot of fishermen turned a "blind eye" to those who were part of this economy. They could say "It's not my problem" or "I'm not getting involved".Today,50 years along, with a far more educated and conservation minded fisherman in the majority, there is much less an inclination to continue in the "old ways of the old days". Granted, you can, if you really look hard enough, still purchase a tinker or two. The majority of the fishermen however,have come to realize that the actions of a few, impact on the livlihood of the many and, as such, are not as reticent as they once were in providing information to the authorities. Over the last half century there also has been a huge shift in the public attitude about drinking and driving. In order to make a shift of this magnitude,we must begin now with our youth and their attitudes. In order to lessen the pressure on fishing fleets to provide Tuna (read sushi and sashimi) a market shift must occur within the nations and peoples creating the demand. The nations controlling the the export of these fish and fish parts(tuna and shark fins), must,(notwithstanding the corruption involved,)stop supporting their citizens in raping the seas for personal profit. If none of the above works at present,(and I hope it does) we had better start collecting DNA samples so that at some time in the future (long after we are all dead), our great-grandchildren may attempt to recreate the apex predators of our oceans. If you want to learn more about the trade in shark fins, the video Sharkwater will give you look into the magnitude of the problem in just one country. Regards.....
 

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In order to lessen the pressure on fishing fleets to provide Tuna (read sushi and sashimi) a market shift must occur within the nations and peoples creating the demand. The nations controlling the the export of these fish and fish parts(tuna and shark fins), must,(notwithstanding the corruption involved,)stop supporting their citizens in raping the seas for personal profit. If none of the above works at present,(and I hope it does) we had better start collecting DNA samples so that at some time in the future (long after we are all dead), our great-grandchildren may attempt to recreate the apex predators of our oceans. If you want to learn more about the trade in shark fins, the video Sharkwater will give you look into the magnitude of the problem in just one country. Regards.....
Now, you are 100% correct when you say a market shift MUST occur! As I stated earlier, it is the market and the demand that drives the fisherman to supply the demand for these fish! The market demand for these fish must be eliminated, and or greatly reduced for a recovery in the fishery. Reducing the supply by cutting the quotas on the harvest will just drive the price on the fish even higher, thus creating an even larger black market trade for these fish. And the European fisherman who don't abide by the quotas anyway, will be the big winners in the game when the price for the fish skyrockets if they reduce the supply by regulating the quotas in the Western Atlantic!!!



http://www.google.co...5674a9676aa.2d1


http://www.ipsnews.net/print.asp?idnews=53613
 

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For those of you who can see no connection between the first part of my post and the second, I was using it to illustrate how long it takes to change attitudes Provincially (lobster) and nationally (drunk driving). Our youth (future representatives)will be the ones to change things because,to date, our current (world/national) representatives have obviously failed to curb the corruption involved in the illegal (which would be a start) Tuna and Sharkfin trade. I am well aware of the legal, (and ethically bankrupt,)overexploitation of these resources but it is our representatives who allow it. Until the matter has a higher profile and is regarded seriously as a matter of foreign policy by both us and the Americans, we shall probably have to wait for our global youth (our future leaders) to solve the problem that we created. (Remember when we promoted the killing of BFT for the manufacture of pet foods??) How many commercial tuna fishermen do YOU know who would agree voluntarily, with a total moratorium?? (just because it is a good idea?) Unfortunately, they will have to be forced - probably at the point of a gun,to stop their activities. Regards.....
 

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For those of you who can see no connection between the first part of my post and the second, I was using it to illustrate how long it takes to change attitudes Provincially (lobster) and nationally (drunk driving). Our youth (future representatives)will be the ones to change things because,to date, our current (world) representatives have obviously failed to curb the corruption involved in the illegal (which would be a start) Tuna and Sharkfin trade. I am well aware of the legal, (and ethically bankrupt,)overexploitation of these resources but it is our representatives who allow it. Until the matter has a higher profile and is regarded seriously as a matter of foreign policy by both us and the Americans, we shall probably have to wait for our global youth (our future leaders) to solve the problem that we created. (Remember when we promoted the killing of BFT for the manufacture of pet foods??) How many tuna fishermen do YOU know who would agree voluntarily, with a total moratorium?? (just because it is a good idea?)
Well Ian,
the problem is not with the US, or Canadian fisherman! It is the fisherman in the Eastern Atlantic that exceed their quotas by 100% or more!!!! The USA and Canadian fisheries are well managed, and sustainable with the current models. Except for the lack of sportfishing for BFT here in Atalantic Canada. But we have already beat that topic to death in previous message threads. LOL

Anyhow, if the commercial DEMAND for these fish is not greatly reduced, or eliminated, and the over fishing in the Eastern Atlantic is not reduced by enforcing the quotas in their waters, then the fishery is doomed, and it will ultimately crash!!!!!
 

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I think we are all aware of the facts. If all we want to do is point fingers,the fishery IS doomed. As I said in my previous posts, our representatives allow the over exploitation both legally and illegally in other waters. The reality is that the issue, again, as I have previously stated, is JUST NOT THAT IMPORTANT to our national governments. Until that is rectified, and action taken, be prepared to sit as a spectator as these fisheries DO crash. End of story!!! And you still want a recreational, (catch and keep) fishery for Tuna in our waters???
Regards.......
 

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I think we are all aware of the facts. If all we want to do is point fingers,the fishery IS doomed. As I said in my previous posts, our representatives allow the over exploitation both legally and illegally in other waters. The reality is that the issue, again, as I have previously stated, is JUST NOT THAT IMPORTANT to our national governments. Until that is rectified, and action taken, be prepared to sit as a spectator as these fisheries DO crash. End of story!!! And you still want a recreational, (catch and keep) fishery for Tuna in our waters???
Regards.......
Anyone who has been fishing in the ocean for the past 20 to 40 years knows by now that certain, if not most fisheries show seasonal fluctuations, and seem to go through cycles of abundance, and low catch periods. In the 80's, the Tuna fisherman thought the fishery was over, as catches were at an all time low. But, today the fishery here in Atlantic Canada and the USA is a strong and viable fishery once again!!! The fisherman are filling their quotas in a very short period of time, and have to stop fishing after they fill their quotas!!! I have only been fishing our local waters for the past few years, but the amount of tuna I have seen in that short period has been phenomenal to say the least!!!!

I recently had the pleasure of talking to Ken Fraser the angler who holds the World Record for BFT here in NS. He recently wrote a book detailing the fishery back in the "GLORY DAYS" of fishing tuna when it was still a sport fishery. It is an interesting read, and I recommend reading it. You can get a copy of the book from his website http://www.kenfraser.ca/index.php
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yesterday, on "Fishing with Friends", I watched Steve land a big tuna in the Northumberland Straight aboard a licensed tuna recreational fishery operator's boat out of Antigonish Cnty.

They claim to live release tuna, and we did see an exhausted fish swim slowly away, but as I've pointed out before, tuna are highly susceptible to lactic acid shock and death, even days after release. Those that die, sink, and disappear.

There is no way to know that a hooked tuna survived C&R unless it is electrically monitored for several days. They don't do that.

I am sorry to hear [with all due respect to Steve] that this wonderful animal has been put in more peril in our home waters, just for the sake of a little fun and a few jobs.

chuck
 

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Yesterday, on "Fishing with Friends", I watched Steve land a big tuna in the Northumberland Straight aboard a licensed tuna recreational fishery operator's boat out of Antigonish Cnty.

They claim to live release tuna, and we did see an exhausted fish swim slowly away, but as I've pointed out before, tuna are highly susceptible to lactic acid shock and death, even days after release. Those that die, sink, and disappear.

There is no way to know that a hooked tuna survived C&R unless it is electrically monitored for several days. They don't do that.

I am sorry to hear [with all due respect to Steve] that this wonderful animal has been put in more peril in our home waters, just for the sake of a little fun and a few jobs.

chuck
Well Fluffy,
as with any other "CATCH & RELEASE FISHERY" you are going to have some mortality from the battle between fish and man, and that is a "FACT"!!! Anyone who thinks otherwise is a fool......!!! So what is the difference if it is a dead Tuna on the bottom of the ocean, or a dead Salmon at the bottom of a stream?????


SO WHAT'S YOUR POINT?????????????????????
 

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Oceana Calls ICCAT Meeting Massive Failure for Bluefin Tuna and Swordfish, Modest Progress for Sharks and Sea Turtles

November 27, 2010
Paris, France


As the 17[sup]th[/sup] Special Meeting of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) closed today in Paris, France, Oceana, the world's largest international ocean conservation organization, called it a "massive failure for bluefin tuna and swordfish, with only modest progress for sharks and sea turtles."

"Despite the flowery rhetoric, it was 'business as usual' for ICCAT," said Dr. Michael Hirshfield, chief scientist and head-of-delegation for Oceana. "It's clear that countries didn't come to Paris ready to conserve the species they are responsible for. As the world watched, ICCAT said 'I Can't'."

ICCAT CAN'T:

  • end industrial fishing, and set and enforce catch limits to restore bluefin tuna populations;
  • prevent breeding bluefin tuna from being caught while spawning;
  • manage swordfish in the Mediterranean Sea at all; and
  • conserve sharks unless they are almost extinct

Bluefin Tuna
Although both the western and eastern Atlantic bluefin tuna populations are seriously depleted, ICCAT failed to establish sufficient protections to restore them.

While ICCAT reduced the allowed catch for eastern Atlantic bluefin tuna to 12,900 tonnes, this four percent reduction is almost laughable. Furthermore, ICCAT failed completely to take action to establish spawning ground sanctuaries, a basic and much-needed management measure. Oceana supports a closure of the bluefin tuna fishery until a system is in place that follows scientific advice on catch levels, ensures stock recovery, stops illegal fishing, and protects spawning areas in the Gulf of Mexico and Mediterranean Sea.

"This trivial quota reduction for the eastern bluefin tuna stock is a political decision, not a science-based one," said Maria Jose Cornax, fisheries campaigns manager for Oceana. "Without an industrial fishing closure, it actually encourages illegal fishing and fails to ensure stock recovery. This political outcome is not good for the fish or the fisherman, and will certainly result in further stock depletion."

"It's business as usual for the western bluefin tuna stock as well," said Hirshfield. "A token quota cut here, a call to investigate identification of spawning areas there-nothing has changed. In the meantime, the stock remains at dangerously low levels of abundance."

Swordfish
Oceana was also disappointed that ICCAT failed to follow-through on its 2009 commitment to establish a "more comprehensive long-term management plan" for Mediterranean swordfish by 2010. Mediterranean swordfish populations have declined substantially in the last twenty years and many swordfish continue to be caught before they have had a chance to spawn even once. Despite this unacceptable situation, the fishery remains essentially unmanaged and uncontrolled.

Sharks
Ironically, those species with the least commercial value received the most protection this year-or perhaps for that reason. Oceana appreciates ICCAT's decisions to protect oceanic whitetip, hammerhead and shortfin mako sharks. ICCAT member countries agreed to a total prohibition on keeping or selling any oceanic whitetip sharks caught in the Atlantic Ocean and a prohibition on keeping or selling hammerhead sharks caught in ICCAT fisheries. The hammerhead measure, which includes all species of hammerhead sharks in the Atlantic Ocean except bonnethead, contains an exemption for hammerheads caught by coastal developing nations for local consumption. Oceanic whitetips have declined by more than 99 percent in the Gulf of Mexico and hammerheads have declined by more than 99 percent in the Mediterranean Sea. Also today, countries with fishermen who catch shortfin mako sharks will now have an additional reason to submit catch data - countries that do not submit data by 2013 will be prohibited from catching mako sharks at all.

"Before today, only one shark species was protected by ICCAT; today we are happy to have eight," said Elizabeth Griffin Wilson, marine scientist and fisheries campaign manager for Oceana. "Sharks are finally beginning to get the attention and protection they deserve."

Earlier this week, Oceana released a new report that estimates that more than 1.3 million highly migratory sharks were caught in the Atlantic Ocean during 2008, without international fisheries management. Oceana believes 1.3 million sharks to be a gross underestimate of the true mortality due to data underreporting in ICCAT. Scientific estimates based on Hong Kong shark fin trade data have shown that real shark catches in the Atlantic Ocean may be more than three times higher than what is reported to ICCAT. Oceana urges ICCAT to take more aggressive action in the future to manage sharks appropriately, in particular the establishment of catch limits.

Sea Turtles
Oceana applauds ICCAT's decision to establish protections for sea turtles. Specifically, ICCAT approved a proposal to require data reporting on the capture of sea turtles in the Atlantic Ocean and mandated the use of hook-removal and fishing line disentanglement gear, which could save tens of thousands of sea turtles accidentally caught in ICCAT fisheries. Scientists estimate that between 240,000 and 350,000 sea turtles are caught in longline fisheries in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea each year.

For more information about ICCAT, bluefin tuna, swordfish, sharks and sea turtles, and for downloadable images, please visit www.oceana.org/ICCAT.


http://na.oceana.org...at-says-i-can-t
 

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Tuna quota down in western Atlantic

Canada's efforts to raise the quota for the bluefin tuna catch in the western Atlantic hit rough waters last week in Paris.

Canada had two goals at the meeting of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tuna: to see the quota raised, and to improve monitoring of the catch. But it failed on both initiatives.

Canada wanted to see the bluefin tuna catch increase by at least 15 per cent, and brought scientific evidence that this would still allow the stocks to rebuild over the next decade. The U.S. was asking for a significant reduction, although the exact amount hasn't been released.

Canada's negotiating position also included new monitoring measures internationally that would mirror how the fishery currently runs in Canada. Every fish is tagged and dockside monitors record each landing. Canada also includes in the quota the estimated number of tuna that will die after they break free from a fishermen's line.

"We were disappointed that other parties fishing the western bluefin tuna fishery did not support those additional reporting and monitoring measures," said Faith Scattolon, who led Canada's delegation.

Fishermen disappointed
Given the lack of interest in improved monitoring, Canada changed its quota request and asked that it remain the same as last year. The final number was down slightly, from 1,800 to 1,750 tonnes.

Walter Bruce, chair of the P.E.I. Fishermen's Association Tuna Advisory Committee, said he was disappointed.

"We shouldn't be going down; we should be going up," said Bruce.

We've suffered pain for a long time now, with reduced quotas every year. It's almost time for some gain, and it hasn't happened yet."

Bruce said after years of conservation, fishermen were hoping for a break, especially after the abundance of tuna seen in the waters this year. P.E.I. caught its quota in two days.




http://www.cbc.ca/te...-iccat-584.html
 

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Tuna not endangered: fishermen

A strong start to the tuna season on P.E.I. has fishermen wondering why scientists are considering recommending listing the fish as endangered.

Scientists from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada are reviewing the status of bluefin tuna stocks in the western Atlantic, and plan on making a recommendation to the federal departments of Environment and Fisheries and Oceans.

Fishermen landed 144 tuna in the first eight hours of fishing Monday off of P.E.I.'s North Shore. Officials expect the remainder of the quota to be caught Tuesday, meaning Island fishermen will catch their quota in two days, just as Nova Scotia fishermen did last week.

The wharf manager at North Lake told CBC News Monday she hasn't seen a day that busy in her 10 years. With catches so good, many P.E.I. fishermen, including Ross Keus, don't think bluefin need to be considered as an endangered species.

"I don't think they have any grounds right here because of the proof of the abundance of tuna in Canada now," said Keus.

"I think it's as strong, if not stronger, than ever."

The industry has been under pressure over fears for the stocks. Earlier this year, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species voted down a motion to ban international trade in tuna, a motion supported by Norway and the United States.

Last week, Metro, a major grocery store chain with 600 stores in Ontario and Quebec, decided to stop selling bluefin tuna. Its managers reviewed the evidence, and believe these fish are at risk of extinction.

Colin MacIsaac, P.E.I.'s resource manager for DFO, said just because the stocks are strong off P.E.I. doesn't mean they are everywhere.

"Although we see lots of evidence that the species is abundant in our waters, there might be other particulars that are going on in other parts of the world that we're not quite aware of," said MacIsaac.

The international body that oversees bluefin tuna fishing is releasing its latest assessment showing how the stocks are doing next week.

http://www.cbc.ca/ca...ngered-584.html

 
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