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Hey fellas, now i know this is totally against the fishing code to be askin where to fish at but i am new to fly fishing stripped bass and i sure would love to try it out this year, if anybody knows any good places with not much brush and some clear water near stewiake/shubenacadie/truro area that are usually pretty good for stripers on the fly gimme a shout, msg me via inbox if youd like, any hints tips or suggestions is appreitated
 

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i dont know but i will be after stripers and shad in shubie this coming season also on the fly rod and if i find good spots ill let ya know or maybe you could tag along. just a thought to ponder
 

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Hi,

I want to fly fish stripers, too, but I think that in tidal Shuby/Stu the water is too muddy. But, maybe I'm wrong.

Anyway, I will try the cleaner water upstream, and later maybe shore fishing the salt chuck in the B. of F.

If anyone knows some 'hot' striper flies, streamers or poppers, I'd appreciate any advice.

cheers,

chuck
 

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Hi,

I want to fly fish stripers, too, but I think that in tidal Shuby/Stu the water is too muddy. But, maybe I'm wrong.

Anyway, I will try the cleaner water upstream, and later maybe shore fishing the salt chuck in the B. of F.

If anyone knows some 'hot' striper flies, streamers or poppers, I'd appreciate any advice.

cheers,

chuck
 

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Well I will not tell you where to go then but I will help you out some. Everybody knows that the bass run in the shubie and stewiacke river so if you think it is to muddy try following the river ontill you hit clear they do come that far (and even farther). But I (think) its not to muddy we have cought a lot of small ones right in the bay of fundy standing on shore. And if you really sit back and think about it people troll the rivers whats the differents between that twister tail and you fly you can tie at home. GOOD LUCK THIS YEAR.
 

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If you think about it stripers are feeding on forage fish, crabs etc.in the muddy water. If a striper can target a gaspereaux in that muddy water a fly would not be a problem. The debris in the water is the bane of flyfishing for me in the muddy water. It seems to be near the surface so once you are down that problem is not as bad.
 

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i just started going after stripers on the fly last year. after 3 casts and landing a 25 incher in fast water, i will never go back. google maps is all of the intel i have on the stewiacke/shubie. i know clear water narrow river striper fishing is out there, just going to take a few trips into the unknown to find out. anyways, surf fishing in muddy water on the bay of fundy has worked for me. ive been standing in 2 feet of water fishing for them and had them brush against me as they swam out of the river into the ocean. anyways, clouser minnows are my fly of choice. good luck fellas

ps here is an article from a magazine i was reading the other day about stripers on the fly. would post the link but i tried and i guess its not allowed. sorry

My own favourite method of taking Striped bass is on flies. Along the east coast of the U.S. fly fishing for bass has become a phenomenon attracting enthusiasts of all ages. On many tidal rivers, estuaries and bays these days, fly fishermen far outnumber anglers using conventional gear. In Maritime Canada, however, fly fishing stripers seems to be pretty much limited to the Annapolis area of Nova Scotia and the Stewiacke/ Shubenacadie River joint estuary.

The fly rod is the only method I use, simply because I have yet to find a way that is more enjoyable. Flies are also a versatile and productive method for stripers in that they can be used from shore or afloat, in deep water or shallow, and they will take big bass as well as small just as readily as most other offerings.

Fly fishing equipment need not be anything special, or expensive. In most situations during the spring, summer and early fall periods I use what is commonly accepted as salmon gear - a 9-foot rod with a strong trip section equipped with a reel capable of carrying 200 yards of backing and size 8 or 9 line. Where long casts with a massive fly are necessary in windy conditions (which is often) and a big 40-lb.-plus brute might be in the offing, a double-handed "Spey" type salmon rod or a tarpon rod would not be at all out of place. Regardless, it is extremely important any reel have a smooth drag that will maintain steady pressure.

Since I fish primarily early or late in the day or after dark when the fish are in close and working shallow water, the line most often used is a floater in a weight-forward taper. Specialty "saltwater tapers" can also be used, but unless super-long casts are needed or strong winds are a problem, the extra concentration of weight in the forward end of line really isn't necessary. When the fish are deep, an intermediate sink-tip will generally suffice. In order to turn over the huge flies, leaders are held to the 8 to 10-foot range and generally just a straight 10 or 12-lb. test monofilament straight off the spool. An exception might be when bass are in extremely shallow water and nervous; when a long tapered leader will greatly increase the number of strikes.

When it comes to flies, keep in mind when stripers are hungry and on the feed bag, most feather-wing and bucktail streamers are apt to work. The conventional long-winged saltwater patterns where the hook bend is well forward are called for - patterns such as Lefty Deceiver's in blue/white, green/white and red/white; Clouser Minnows, the Sand Eel Fly and the Whistler Fly, all in sizes 4 to 3/0, are a good selection to get started. And do carry flies in various sizes. Striped bass can be selective even when actively feeding. Changing from one size to another can make all the difference, and a fly six inches long is not out of the question.

Bear in mind too that unlike many other saltwater game, Striped bass lack large, or sharp-cutting teeth. They usually intake food head first, gripping it and then crushing it. In the process, prey is typically dragged several inches before being swallowed. When hitting a fly they do the same thing, generally giving only a slight but solid tug on the line. Stripers react to a popper in much the same way, attacking from below and sucking it down. Even if the take is explosive, waiting several seconds to set the hook will increase the success ratio. In most cases, simply taking in excess line and lifting the rod tip will suffice. The fish will actually hook themselves. If the strike is aggressive, set the hook accordingly - but strike too quickly, and the chances are fly and flyline will come sailing back towards you.

In general, fly fishing for stripers is no different than fly fishing for any other fish. Look for potential feeding and holding areas, and then determine the best approach. When fishing the shallows, work cautiously and never underestimate your target…

…And when you do hook into a big fella that takes off like a freight train, just hang on. He will stop eventually - but not always!

Have spare line with you.
 

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TROLLL, an excelent write up on striper fishing on the fly! i would only disagree with the leader weight and that is just because i'm fishing them on the saint john river and reversing falls areas, and they come a a bit bigger here and the bottom structure is fly and lure absorbing. oh, and there are some others fly fishing for striper - shhhh, it's hard to find any empty rocks to stand on now - lol!!!
again, great write up (and i have the same fly selection, rod and set up!)
 

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Trolll, welcome to the site and thanks for shareing excellent information on fly fishing stripers. Great post and as an avid striper on the fly fisher the info is great!
 

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Great post for sure, troll you filled in a lot of blanks for me.
Perry, I also recently reread your article on the subject in Eastern Woods and Water, stripers on a fly rod is my goal this year

Greg
 

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Greg, the next issue of EWW after that article was the last issue. I then wrote an article of fly fishing stripers for Canadian FlyFisher and the next issue was it's last. I stopped writing articles on flyfishing stripers so we would have a few mags left! LOL
 

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hey iam new to fly fishing bass iam wondering about fly fishing them the frist week in june in the shuby river eney one got me some tips on flyshooks or good spots plese reply or in box

thanks auddie
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
troll thanks a ton, man i really do appretiate all the replies and info, good to see that were all still good natured around here. Great write up, thats better than any info you will find on the internet, really quite impressed at your knoledge, thnks again everybody who has replied.
 

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troll thanks a ton, man i really do appretiate all the replies and info, good to see that were all still good natured around here. Great write up, thats better than any info you will find on the internet, really quite impressed at your knoledge, thnks again everybody who has replied.
Hi;

Actually, I first read the article on the internet some time ago. It is from Eastern Woods and Waters, 2009. From what he has said, I suspect that Perry wrote it.

I have the link but it doesn't transfer to this site. I guess they blocked it from 'cut and paste' since I bookmarked it.

Just for future reference, such articles fall under 'intellectual property' law, and to 'cut and paste' the entire article [not excerpts], is contrary to the law, and possible charges could be laid. Usually, [tho' not in this case] they don't mind posting just the URL. Much worse if the quoting does not acknowledge the source, i.e., book, magazine etc., and especially the author. Anything else is plagiarism. But this article does not name its author on the web page. Was it you, Perry?

I used to post this kind of link, but was criticized for doing it and called 'academic', and 'pedantic' and whatnot, so I stopped posting the 'how to' stuff. Which is why I did not post the link back when when I first read it and bookmarked it. I can still get to it from my bookmark, but the link is now blocked to cut n' paste.

I was going to say nothing because so many people praised Troll, but the since praise goes on for something illegal, I feel that I have to warn future posters, [and Dave] about liability. This is not a criticism of Troll or anyone else--just a caution.

cheers,

chuck
 

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hey all
i didn't write that article, i took it from EWW. i said in the initial post, "here is an article from a magazine. . . tried to post the link to their website, but its not allowed"

a little plagiarism never hurt anyone.
cheers
 

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a little plagiarism never hurt anyone.
Actually it does. Plagiarism in school will get you expelled. Plagiarism at work will get you fired. Any quotation (even of your own work) without proper citation is problematic in those situations.

In this instance, you did state that the post was "an article from a magazine;" however, the magazine's name, date and title of the article as well as the author's name should have been included. Doing otherwise is plagiarism (defined as theft of intellectual property).

I'm sure that you didn't do this with intent, and likely no harm will come of it. But please do exercise caution next time you want to quote someone else's work.
 

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Hi;

Actually, I first read the article on the internet some time ago. It is from Eastern Woods and Waters, 2009. From what he has said, I suspect that Perry wrote it.

I have the link but it doesn't transfer to this site. I guess they blocked it from 'cut and paste' since I bookmarked it.

Just for future reference, such articles fall under 'intellectual property' law, and to 'cut and paste' the entire article [not excerpts], is contrary to the law, and possible charges could be laid. Usually, [tho' not in this case] they don't mind posting just the URL. Much worse if the quoting does not acknowledge the source, i.e., book, magazine etc., and especially the author. Anything else is plagiarism. But this article does not name its author on the web page. Was it you, Perry?

I used to post this kind of link, but was criticized for doing it and called 'academic', and 'pedantic' and whatnot, so I stopped posting the 'how to' stuff. Which is why I did not post the link back when when I first read it and bookmarked it. I can still get to it from my bookmark, but the link is now blocked to cut n' paste.

I was going to say nothing because so many people praised Troll, but the since praise goes on for something illegal, I feel that I have to warn future posters, [and Dave] about liability. This is not a criticism of Troll or anyone else--just a caution.

cheers,

chuck
Hey Chuck,

Any really good info on fishing... habits, stats, theories etc... I would personally welcome. I do not care if I am called academic, anemic or aristocratic. Sticks and stones. If you find some really interesting stuff you want to share, send me a private note and I will post it under my name and anyone who wants to call me names I will officially challenge to a surf casting competition, loser buys the beer.

LOL

Take care,

James
 

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Hey Chuck,

Any really good info on fishing... habits, stats, theories etc... I would personally welcome. I do not care if I am called academic, anemic or aristocratic. Sticks and stones. If you find some really interesting stuff you want to share, send me a private note and I will post it under my name and anyone who wants to call me names I will officially challenge to a surf casting competition, loser buys the beer.

LOL

Take care,

James
Hi;

Will do. I'm up for that beach casting bet, too---so long everybody uses the exact same piece of gear.


cheers,

chuck
 
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