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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone interested in sharing knowledge. Not many people around that use them. I thought maybe a bunch of us could get together somewhere and share knowledge. I have a couple of rods and line combos and I am always looking to learn more.
 

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This will be my 3rd year using a two hander and I love it!
I started with the Spey (two-hander)in December. I have enjoyed it tremendously and it was the beginning of a long and lasting meaningful relationship when I got my first fish on it... a 32" Steelhead January 1st.. The only thing better than swinging flies with it... using it on the flats...wow!

Do you guys have any Spey Claves out east?

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
We should do a small Spey Clay somewhere sometime. Penhorne Lake in Dartmouth is perfect but we have to wait until all the kids are back to school. Not a lot of rivers that ca handle it.
 

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Hi Leaper

I would come to something like that. I am very new to two handed rods and can use all the help I can get.
If you're interested you should check out the Atlantic Flyfishing School. (www.flyschool.net)
Dennis Grant who runs it has been interested in Spey casting for some time, and , I believe, has the Fed of Flyfishers certification as a Speycasting instructor.
I've taken classes with Dennis on a couple of occasions and like him a lot as a very knowledgeable instructor.
Tom
 

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One thing that I'd like to point out for those who want to start Spey casting... okay two things. Bear in mind that I'm no pro or instructor.

1. Remember that ultimately everything ends with a roll cast.
2. The same moves that are accomplished with a two-hander can be done with a one-hander. Practice the Circle C, Snap T and of of course the Single and Double Spey. Any piece of grass is good for this when using the one-hander although a pond, lake, river or puddle is better.
3. Skagit lines are definitely a good place to start. Easier to cast due to the heavier more compact head as opposed to long belly lines.

Okay it was 3 things.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would stay away from a Skagit rig in the beginning. Yes they are easier to cast; however, the technique is slightly different. Also it makes casting a bit easier and it can lead to bad form. Start with a medium length head and get your technique down. Then try other heads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Skagit rigs require a deep water anchor therefore timing is not as critical as in most casting. Shagit rigs are very forgiving when it comes to where you place your water anchor. Traditional Casting or Scandinavian casting, timing and anchor placement is everything. Not as forgiving. Once you nail down landing your anchor correctly and the right amount, everything else will fall into place.

But you are right Skagit rigs are soooooo nice.
 

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At the Clave I'm attending this weekend... or at least supposed to attend I'm going to use it as an excuse to give Scandi a shot. Last year at the same Clave I had the pleasure of watching Simon Gawesworth cast the Traditional lines.. sheer beauty. Gordon Macleod and Scott Mackenzie are attending this year.

If I like the Scandi style.. I'll definitely be switching up as I like the systems available. Much better for my home river (the Niagara) as those systems get the fly down better.

Alex
 

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I would stay away from a Skagit rig in the beginning. Yes they are easier to cast; however, the technique is slightly different. Also it makes casting a bit easier and it can lead to bad form. Start with a medium length head and get your technique down. Then try other heads.
I second this recommendation. 'Slightly easier' is not the correct phrase, you should have said 'much easier'. Skagit casting is a great technique for the application in which it was intended--'throwing' big flies and heavy flies to get deep quickly--but it is not the end-all, be-all of two handed casting as many seem to think. The poor technique you will develop by learning on this system will translate to other casting styles should you choose to switch down the road. It is easy to go from traditional mid or long belly lines to Skagit lines for a decent caster, but the reverse is not always true.

This isnt to say becoming a 'master' in Skagit casting isnt difficult; it is. Anybody (seriously) can flop out a fishable cast with a Skagit line, but there are aspects which require practice and proficiency to master. I am not trying to say the style is akin to spin fishing or anything of that nature (as some often do), but the fact does hold true that it is far easier to learn than learning the casting a of 'traditional' spey line. You absolutely will develop bad techniques, and they will be difficult to break.

The other thing about Skagit casting (for those that arent 'masters') is that the line comes down with quite the plop, splash and KERPLOW. This is fine when fishing the huge, steep gradiented, hard flowing, winter rivers in the Pac NW, but just try to imagine what that does to the salmon is a slow flowing, quiet pool....

My 2 pennies, which are worth just that (minus 2 pennies
)
 

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1. Remember that ultimately everything ends with a roll cast.
Yeah kinda but at the same time it's very different, I like to refer to the final part of a spey cast as a modified roll cast that's slightly different for every style of spey casting, there's more to a spey delivery than the karate chop roll cast. You can do traditional roll casts with spey rods using the appropriate line.

I'm in Sydney by the way and have two setups. Where are all the CB spey casters?? Anyone interested?
 
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