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Just wondering the general opinion of the legality of a shank fly for salmon ( fly tied on a hook shank or waddington /cotter pin with a trailor hook attached at the rear with a mono loop or braid loop ). I havent used them for salmon but the west coasters do for steel and salmon alot. Smaller hooks and shorter shanks for better landing rate/less harm to fish with an octapus hook which helps prevent deep hooking the fish. Works out to the same weight a s a single hook of comparable size for the pattern used. U can also set the hooks point up to prevent snaging which is another plus. Just thought id throw this one out there to get some diff opinions. Ive used them for smallies and the hook is always in the lip and not deep. Mine were tied cheapo style with cotterpins
 

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they r legal. folks have been tying on waddintons for years. have not used them personally, i like to tie on tubes, u have the advantage of a short shank tube and most of the time the fly will slide up the leader out of the fishes mouth making then last longer. i have tied some MOAL leaches using a octopus trailer and a ring eye for the forward and hook connecting them with some braid. u have to cut the forward hook point off to keep it legal. haven't fished them for salmon but work well for bass and pickerel.
 

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Well, some i tie in a small mono loop at the back of the fly. I run my leader through the front eye, along the topof the fly and then out through the loop at the back. A waddington has a back loop so use that. I guess im referring to my cheapo style cotterpin flies. Anyhow, i then tie on my octopus hook and secure that to the cotterpin/waddington with a piece of junction tubing, which is exactly the came as a tube fly. The fly can let go and slide up the leader out of the way. I guess with the hook looped directly onto the mono loop it would be called a stinger/retriever fly. So, these are legal in the NS and NB? Just want ot be sure before i start on some christmas tree intruders for april 15th
 

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i am pretty sure, i have only fished for salmon in newfoundland and had no problem with them. i would have at it and tie away. would like to see those xmas tree intruders. sounds interesting. where r u using those.
 

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i am pretty sure, i have only fished for salmon in newfoundland and had no problem with them. i would have at it and tie away. would like to see those xmas tree intruders. sounds interesting. where r u using those.
Hi JR
Interesting stuff but it sounds like keeping a cotter pin in the top 10 inches of water might be a challenge. I suspose if the water was froze it could be done.
Have a nice day
Paul
 

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way back in the early 90's i asked a girl working at the dfo if i could use these flies and she entusiasticly said no.i tried to explain it the best i could , but she wanted to hear nothing of it, and told me i could use a regular hook only , or a double hook , but NOT A FLY TIED IN TANDOM. again , that was a long time ago, and it may have changed.good luck with it.i think the style is engenious.like a leverage spinnerbait.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Some of the cotter pins that i have are extremely skinny weighing much less than a #2 iron. Even with the hook. There must be someone on here who could clarify this. I think it would be a great fly to fish.
JR- fishing them opening week on the miramichi. Highwater fall margaree too. The 2 green and yellow ones
 

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Hi JR
Interesting stuff but it sounds like keeping a cotter pin in the top 10 inches of water might be a challenge. I suspose if the water was froze it could be done.
Have a nice day
Paul
what does the comment " the top ten inches of water" mean? this year well be my first for east coast salmon and i am interested in all the feedback i can get. thanks in advance
 

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what does the comment " the top ten inches of water" mean? this year well be my first for east coast salmon and i am interested in all the feedback i can get. thanks in advance
Hi Trader
I was alluding to a post of jrfreeman of a few days ago where he quoted something to that effect. I wondered what it meant also as I had never heard of it previously.
Have a nice evening
Paul
 

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the regulations for salmon angling in newfoundland r the fly must be unweighted single barbless hook, no double or triple hooks. no weight can be added to the fly or line, u can't use sink tip, full sinking or intermediate lines. I think the "10 inches below the surface" quote is a way of regulating the weight of a fly. Up here most guys and gals swing wet flies on a tight line, and this keeps them close to the surface, and hitching the fly will almost keep it on the surface so it is not a problem. and fishing a dry fly is a no brainer.
 

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u would be surprised how hard it is to sink those big marabou intruder style flies, even a cotter pin won't make any difference to the weight. when u r swinging the fly in heavy current the fly is only in the water for a short period of time. not like fishing in still-water where the fly has all day to sink, once the fly is on a tight line it will start coming to the surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OK, so im guessing that nobody knows if they are leagal to use or not? Somebody from the dnr must visit this site and can give the proper info on this one. Someone should define clearly what fly styles are legal on the miramichi and the margaree other than non-weighted barbless and single hook. Theres quite a few options out there. It would be good to know for everyone.
 

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bad news for these for the miramichi. in nb they are legal in most places for trout and bass, but salmon are one hook only and miramichie has the same rule form both salmon, trout and anything else. also barbless only there. you may be okay with just clipping off the hook from the curve down (not just the point) of the front hook. i'm not so sure about the cotter pin though - it says no weight added to make it sink, and they might claim that it was your aim to use it for weight. this is a tricky one. for black salmon this spring, since most troll the flies, you can certainly expect the fly to sink...and maybe get stuck. i wonder if you could tie them on a plastic wire tie? or perhaps using 50 or 100# test? i fish atlantics on the miramichie and land lochs in sw nb, and since these have very different rules on the flies, i now keep them in seperate fly boxes, clearly marked to avoid fines (they were checking almost everbody last year there at the start of the season, looking for barbed hooks and more than one hook. a fishing buddy forgot to pinch one...and paid the fine. the odd thing is, i haven't been able to find a single salmon fly in that area that doesn't have a barbed hook....?!!!)

i'll see you there. oh, and i know the christmas tree is an awesome fly there! i tied a couple up his week.

jcampbell, you had the whole regs when you said "non-weighted barbless and single hook." except there can be no spinner of any kind too. they have a little check piece to make sure it's "barbless" enough for them. it's not a surface thing - you are allowed to use a sinking line or sinking tip, just no added weight. last year you were just as good using a floating line.

i'm sorry i was so late replying, i don't often check the salmon leads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hey there, thanks for the reply. When i am refering to shank flies i am talking about the waddington shanks. these r designed to be fished like tube flies. Deff wouldnt try the cotterpin idea unless a CO told me for sure. So, the hook and shank r considered 2 diff parts of the fly and the shank would be considered weighting the flies? There is no hook on the shank to begin with so it would only be a #4-#6 octopus hook rigged like a tube fly. The line goes through the up eye on the front, along the top/back and down through the rear loop and tied to the hook which is fixed to the shank via junction tube. I would think this would be the same as tying on a tube except that its a shank. I fished tubes all last spring when i was there.
 
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