Nova Scotia Fishing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been wanting to purchase a fishing boat for a long time, but it looks like it will take at least another year before I can convince my wife that buying a fishing boat is as wise a spending choice as buying a ton of shoes. Meanwhile, I'm looking into getting into kayak fishing, and I would appreciate it very much if anyone has any recommendations. While I do plan to do saltwater fishing, I will not be venturing out into the open ocean but instead stick to smaller bays on calm days. I prefer a sit-in kayak, one that is light enough for me to load it on top of my car by myself without using any extra gadgets. Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
Whats your price range?
a nice wilderness systems Pungo may be a viable option
Perception Kayaks makes a model called "impulse" thats pretty good (but only 10ft)
Old town also make some nice sit ins (Dirigo, Vapor, Camden)

is a Sit in mandatory?

IMO, you should get a kayak for the worst conditions you'll encounter then work backwards.

Ive used Sit in Kayaks, and they are ok, but you are restricted, and depending on your size, you may feel enclosed.
if thats what you want, by all means do it.

I prefer a Sit on top myself, I own an Ocean Kayak Trident 15

and im super happy with it.

LIke Scott Said below, check out http://canadiankayakanglers.com i think that place will help you out.
Im a Mod/admin for the site if you need a hand with anything shoot me a PM. we have a great bunch of Kayak anglers over there, and a lot from our area
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
I just ordered one from Paul at Ecological Adventures(http://ecologicaladventures.ca/) in Ormocto. I ordered the Trident 15 angler, I read all the reviews and joined the Kayak fishing forum(http://canadiankayakanglers.com/)gathered all the pertinant information and got the best bang for my buck for myself...and what I told my wife I payed for it...lol kidding...maybe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
I was also thinking of getting boat but simply not in the budget and no way to haul it around, I looked at Kayaks but still pricey and i have limited storage, so now i am thinking hard about getting a float tube.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
433 Posts
I perfer sit ins... own three of them and there are lots out there that make great fishing vessels.... price range ould be a help.

Here are a few sit ins to have a look at

Wilderness systems pamlico and pungo (i have a pamlico 120 with rudder)
Native Watercraft Marvel
Old Town Dirago and Cayuga (ii have a Cayuga 146)
Necky Zoar, Looksha 14
 

·
Admin
Joined
·
551 Posts
A lot depends on your price range, however I prefer SOT kayaks and more notably, ones by Hobie with the Mirage Drive system which allows you to power the boat with your feet (like a step machine while sitting down) and leaves your hands free for what is really important, fishing
Go see the folks at Atlantic Winds Adventure near Burnside in Dartmouth (http://www.atlanticwindsadventure.com/content.php?page=2). Good luck and I'm sure you'll enjoy the stealth of fishing from a yak, I know I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Sit ins and sit on tops both have their place, I wouldn't buy a sit on top unless you are planning on getting somewhat serious about kayak fishing, as to fish them in 3 seasons you will need to invest in proper immersion protection among other things and in general, it can get very expensive. If you just want something to toss on your car and head out on the lake for a few hours, get one of the pamlico or neckys. If you want to fish the ocean or plan to be in your kayak for long periods of time without a break, or if you plan on doing much camping when kayaking, get a sit on top like an ocean kayak or hobie. Even the best sit-in touring kayaks can give you numb legs and back pain if you sit in them for 6-7 hours on end.
 

·
Levity Consultant
Joined
·
1,787 Posts
Golfisher,

I'm not sure how we both ended up married to Imelda Marcos, but since she's always trying on different shoes before she buys them, I think that you should try on (i.e., test drive) different yaks.

The SOT vs. SIK decision is not to be taken lightly; after that, the differences are more subtle but still important. The good thing is that there are lots of great yaks available.

Paul

P.S.: Like Dave, I prefer Hobie SOTs with a Mirage Drive. My favourite short, light SIK so far was one of Perry's I borrowed (a 10' Old Town Loon, as I recall).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
CT carries pelican brand wich are reasonably priced, my neighbour has two and she loves them!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
TAO (downtown by MEC) does a pool lesson on kayaks. It's a great way to be introduced to kayaks and more importantly they bring a wide selection of boats for you to play with and try out. You'll get to have a feel for them and the different designs available.

Also - I would never buy a boat that I didnt get to try out for an hour first. Their fit/feel is important and 2 min on the shop floor doesnt tell you how comfortable they will be after sitting in them for an hour. They also respond differently depending on your body size/weight so the guy at the shop can tell you how wonderful a boat feels, only to find out that it's crap for you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks to all for the replies. My preference for sit-on is because of what captain plastic mentioned, about having to sink in additional coin and inconvenience for waterproofing myself to extend my fishing to more than just summer months. But, I guess I should try out different kayaks before deciding on that SOT or SIK question. My budget is around $1,000 for a new kayak, but I am also open to getting a used kayak since I am not sure at this point whether or not I will actually enjoy kayak fishing.

My one major concern with larger kayaks is that I happen to be vertically challenged (5'7"), my biceps are no longer what they used to be, and I am afraid I will not be able to lift up the kayak to load it on my car by myself. For those of you using a 60+ lb kayak, how difficult is it to load it on your car by yourself? I'm not sure if this wimp can handle it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
Ill chime in here lol
Im 5'2" with a 15ft kayak.. see pic above
I also have Artifical hips, so im limited to how much im allowed to lift (although I really
dont listen to what the Doctors say lol).
i can get my rig up on my Ford Escape with not much effort.
ive made myself a rig that i set on my roof, that allows me to slide it on (from behind)
very easily.
i invested in a small step ladder from home depot that lets me have that extra height that a vertically challenged individual lacks. Ill have to make a video of me putting my boat up on my truck to show what i mean.
You just need to find creative ways to get from point A to point B.
i also have a cart to pull my boat around that i got on Kijiji, but they can be easily made out of a cheap golf cart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
Golfisher,
I'm with pmorris on this one. I own a SOT Hobie PF with a Mirage drive. While it is not as nimble as some of the smaller yaks, I can control it by my feet leaving my hands free to fish. It's an amazing rig!! I can even stand in mine if I want to stretch!! Good luck with your choice. Ocean also makes a nice SOT. Regards....
 

·
Levity Consultant
Joined
·
1,787 Posts
My one major concern with larger kayaks is that I happen to be vertically challenged (5'7"), my biceps are no longer what they used to be, and I am afraid I will not be able to lift up the kayak to load it on my car by myself. For those of you using a 60+ lb kayak, how difficult is it to load it on your car by yourself? I'm not sure if this wimp can handle it.
I like to think of 5'7" as normal. I too am normal, give or take an inch.

I have a 58 pound canoe I can cartop by myself with the aid of a load bar.

My Hobie Sport has a 48 pound hull weight and I can sling it into the back of my minivan without difficulty. With the use of a canoe or kayak cart, transporting either along groomed trails/portages is a breeze.

Part of any test drive should be handling the boat off the water as well as on it. See how it is to load and carry.

Paul
 

·
Levity Consultant
Joined
·
1,787 Posts
i doubt he`d find a Hobie for $1000.
My Hobie Sport was about $1200 new, which included a bunch of accessories (e.g., Mirage Drive, paddle, kayak cart, seat, bag, cooler, tackle box, Scotty mount and rod holder, anchor kit, dry bag, speedometer, and Hank Parker's autograph).

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
433 Posts
Here is a few pics of my sit yaks.... I do fish from them for as much as 12 hours a go and usually 6 hours at a time atleast... the kayaks today have such good seats that I rarely some out feeling any discomfort.... may walk alittle funny for a minute but no pain... and I do have a bad back.

My main craft Cayuga 146


Pamlico 120 with rudder


and my Necky Manitou 2 for outtings with the kids and father...

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
wow! this is a hot topic golfisher!

here's my 2 cents! lol!!!


for your price range, sis is the best bet, although you can get used sot's for that price. as to which is easier to move, haul around - sis is the hands down winner. much lighter, almost all are designed to be moved by one person. of course, there are exceptions, like the sot's that have a wheel at the back - great for paved boat ramps, okay at best for grass, rocks etc., and that wheel doesn't help much for putting it on the roof.

when you are looking at 4 season or just 3 season fishing around here, sis is tops again. with a sot, you would need waders, boots and a pfc that you would stake your life on. they are much cooler in the spring and fall (winter!!!) and offer no protection from the sun for your feet and legs in the summer sun. that said, for fishing in warm months they are great. in fact, i plan to make a wooden version for summer mackeral fishing. i have a problem using them to fish toothy critters like pickeral and fish you throw nasty gear at, like stripers with big cranks armed with nasty hooks - do you really want to have the fish decide if it's going to hook you when landing? i fish enough so i have seen it happen several times, so unless i'm going for mackeral, smallies or trout, it's sis for me. everytime i see the guy from the kayak fishing show landing a fish using his boga with his legs in the water, i wonder how long it's going to take before he needs a ride to the hospital to get a fish and lure removed from his leg! and then there's when he gets surrounded by sharks...!!! (i have often been surronded by pickeral - they think my natural wood finish yak is a log!!! lol! keep your fingers out of the water!)

just my opinion, but i believe sis scare fewer fish, since they can see less motion (no feet dangling in the water or visible leg movement).

i'm not promoting my own kayaks (well, a little i guess) but what you want is the kayak that i have been fishing in for years or a copy of it. i'm in the proccess of making a new version, but it's the old one you want. the reasons for this is i'm disabled in my arms, not to bad most times, useless other times. it turns out kayaking is the second best physio for my arms (the best is snapping twigs! lol!!!).
so when i built it, one design parameter was that i could lift it with one hand, and that i could put it on top of my car and off by myself. it weights 30#, is about 12' 6" long, 29" wide, wooden. since i was already disabled, and this was about my 9th or 10th yak i built, i reduced the weight everywhere i could except for the handles - i like a sturdy brass handle, and i'll drop weight elsewhere to make up for it. as i built it, where i screwed and glued connections, in most cases i removed the screws after the glue set. i modified the stern deck for easier access with bad arms, something i'm using on my new one along with modifying the bow deck on the new one.
they are nice yak's, even surfs well!

as for the problems with the chair in a sis, it really doesn't apply anymore, get the seat you like and adjust it for comfort. the width of the yak has more to do with the comfort of your legs, something i'm addressing with my new design.

i could make you one for between $800 to 1000, depending on the seat you want and if you want it rigged or not. the new version is a bit more work and a bit heavier, still under 45#, and i could build one for about $150-200 more.

if i were you, like said several times above, try them out, take a look at them. go to the kayak fishing tourney at the first of may and take a look at the kayaks and talk to the yakers there. i don't plan to take my smaller yak for that trip but did offer to lend it to some one, so it could still end up there. it would look like a wooden version of the Pamlico 120 with a raised back deck and a bit more leg room.

good luck with which ever kayak you get!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Again, thanks to everyone for sharing his thoughts.

Has anyone used or heard of Riot Kayaks? There is a SOT called Escape 12 made by Riot, which looks pretty good and is on sale under spring clearance.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top