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I have just created a Facebook group to collect names to be used to lobby the Federal Government to allow the recreational take of all offshore fish species that are presently monopolized by the commercial fishing industry here in Nova Scotia!

Join this group if you want access to more recreational sportfishing in the offshore waters of Nova Scotia:

http://www.facebook....135771403134247

 

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How exactly would you justify having a recreational fishery of for a species like halibut where the total allowable catch really is not a very big number, especially when looking at how heavy many of these fish can get?

Not to mention dealing with just some of the major concerns of the fishing industry (who pay lots of taxes and employ a very large amount of rural Nova Scotians) with regards to ensuring conservation measures are followed, accounting for all landings and discards (live released discards of halibut must be accounted for in the catch and statistical models no matter the fish condition and mortality probability), and dealing with an increase in risk of poaching?

I often see huge numbers generated by the sportfishing industry in terms of access to these marine ressources and the value generated, yet I have very rarely found these numbers to be accurate and justifiable.

Irregardless of being heavily involved in the fishing industry, what would be the benefits I would gain as a Canadian citizen if this proposal was to be put in place? How would the concerns of a critical industry be addressed?

I am an avid sportfisherman, which is why I am on this message board, but I would not support a proposal unless it had all of these and many more concerns fully fleshed out.
 

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How exactly would you justify having a recreational fishery of for a species like halibut where the total allowable catch really is not a very big number, especially when looking at how heavy many of these fish can get?

Not to mention dealing with just some of the major concerns of the fishing industry (who pay lots of taxes and employ a very large amount of rural Nova Scotians) with regards to ensuring conservation measures are followed, accounting for all landings and discards (live released discards of halibut must be accounted for in the catch and statistical models no matter the fish condition and mortality probability), and dealing with an increase in risk of poaching?

I often see huge numbers generated by the sportfishing industry in terms of access to these marine ressources and the value generated, yet I have very rarely found these numbers to be accurate and justifiable.

Irregardless of being heavily involved in the fishing industry, what would be the benefits I would gain as a Canadian citizen if this proposal was to be put in place? How would the concerns of a critical industry be addressed?

I am an avid sportfisherman, which is why I am on this message board, but I would not support a proposal unless it had all of these and many more concerns fully fleshed out.
I have the highest regard for commercial fishers and respect there livelyhood.

But...why can Canadians fish alongside commercial fishers in BC for Halibut and we can't here? Hasn't the details been worked out on the west coast already?
 

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How exactly would you justify having a recreational fishery of for a species like halibut where the total allowable catch really is not a very big number, especially when looking at how heavy many of these fish can get?

Not to mention dealing with just some of the major concerns of the fishing industry (who pay lots of taxes and employ a very large amount of rural Nova Scotians) with regards to ensuring conservation measures are followed, accounting for all landings and discards (live released discards of halibut must be accounted for in the catch and statistical models no matter the fish condition and mortality probability), and dealing with an increase in risk of poaching?

I often see huge numbers generated by the sportfishing industry in terms of access to these marine ressources and the value generated, yet I have very rarely found these numbers to be accurate and justifiable.

Irregardless of being heavily involved in the fishing industry, what would be the benefits I would gain as a Canadian citizen if this proposal was to be put in place? How would the concerns of a critical industry be addressed?

I am an avid sportfisherman, which is why I am on this message board, but I would not support a proposal unless it had all of these and many more concerns fully fleshed out.
First of all, let me say this is just the start of the beginning to a long road to try and get sportfisherman access to a resource that has been monopolize by by the Federal Government, and the commercial industry for years now.

I have well over 30 years of commercial & sport offshore fishing experience from when I lived on the West coast, so I know both sides of the coin, and I have some good insight into both commercial & recreational fishing!!

The Tuna fishery here in NS is a prime example of political and commercial greed. What once started as sportfishery that had great social and economic value, but now is only available for commercial exploitation because of the high bounty on the heads of these fish. I like to catch tuna, I like to eat tuna, but since I live in NS where there is no recreational take of these species, I can not land one for my own personal consumption. The BFT is a Higly Migratory Species (HMS) and is a shared resource with the USA. "ALL OF THE US STATES ALLOW THE RECREATIONAL TAKE OF BFT", but once these same fish swim into CANADIAN waters, they are OFFLIMITS to recreational angling, and only open for commercial exploitation.

The Halibut fishery is a little more complex than the HMS like sharks, swordfish, and tuna. But, I can't see how allowing a one fish limit during a certain seasonal allowable catch is going to put an exessive strain on the fishery? But as with all the bottom fish here in NS, that is going to have to be properly addressed. I like to catch Halibut, I like to eat Halibut, so why shouldn't I be allowed to keep a fish for my own personal consumption?

Anyhow, this is just the start to collect names and a head count of people like myself who love sportfishing, and want a small peice of the large pie when it comes to offshore recreational angling here in NS!!!!!
 

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First of all, let me say this is just the start of the beginning to a long road to try and get sportfisherman access to a resource that has been monopolize by by the Federal Government, and the commercial industry for years now.

I have well over 30 years of commercial & sport offshore fishing experience from when I lived on the West coast, so I know both sides of the coin, and I have some good insight into both commercial & recreational fishing!!

The Tuna fishery here in NS is a prime example of political and commercial greed. What once started as sportfishery that had great social and economic value, but now is only available for commercial exploitation because of the high bounty on the heads of these fish. I like to catch tuna, I like to eat tuna, but since I live in NS where there is no recreational take of these species, I can not land one for my own personal consumption. The BFT is a Higly Migratory Species (HMS) and is a shared resource with the USA. "ALL OF THE US STATES ALLOW THE RECREATIONAL TAKE OF BFT", but once these same fish swim into CANADIAN waters, they are OFFLIMITS to recreational angling, and only open for commercial exploitation.

The Halibut fishery is a little more complex than the HMS like sharks, swordfish, and tuna. But, I can't see how allowing a one fish limit during a certain seasonal allowable catch is going to put an exessive strain on the fishery? But as with all the bottom fish here in NS, that is going to have to be properly addressed. I like to catch Halibut, I like to eat Halibut, so why shouldn't I be allowed to keep a fish for my own personal consumption?

Anyhow, this is just the start to collect names and a head count of people like myself who love sportfishing, and want a small peice of the large pie when it comes to offshore recreational angling here in NS!!!!!
I am not completely up to date with regards to the tuna fishery, so I am choosing to focus on your halibut comments.

The total allowable catch set by Canada for halibut in NAFO area 3NOPs4VWX+5 is only 1,700 mt, which is 70% higher than in 2000 when it was set at 1,000 mt. If you are not familiar with NAFO areas, that area spans from the south coast of Newfoundland and Grand Banks down to Georges Bank (The Gulf of St. Lawrence stock is treated as a separate stock). That 1,700 mt quota has to satisfy the halibut by-catch needs of all non-targeted fisheries and also support the targeted halibut fishery by fixed gear vessels in Nova Scotia, St. Pierre et Miquelon and Newfoundland.

When you are talking about a fish that often weigh in excess of 200 lbs and you are talking about a fish that also sells for $6 to $12 a pound, you can see why there would be many concerns even by the removal of only 1 fish per person. Even using an average weight of 100 lbs, it would only take 37,478 halibut caught to catch the total allowable catch.

I am aware BC has a recreational fishery, but I am not sure how it works. Please take the time to educate me on the mechanism you would propose to make this work.
 

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I am not completely up to date with regards to the tuna fishery, so I am choosing to focus on your halibut comments.

The total allowable catch set by Canada for halibut in NAFO area 3NOPs4VWX+5 is only 1,700 mt, which is 70% higher than in 2000 when it was set at 1,000 mt. If you are not familiar with NAFO areas, that area spans from the south coast of Newfoundland and Grand Banks down to Georges Bank (The Gulf of St. Lawrence stock is treated as a separate stock). That 1,700 mt quota has to satisfy the halibut by-catch needs of all non-targeted fisheries and also support the targeted halibut fishery by fixed gear vessels in Nova Scotia, St. Pierre et Miquelon and Newfoundland.

When you are talking about a fish that often weigh in excess of 200 lbs and you are talking about a fish that also sells for $6 to $12 a pound, you can see why there would be many concerns even by the removal of only 1 fish per person. Even using an average weight of 100 lbs, it would only take 37,478 halibut caught to catch the total allowable catch.

I am aware BC has a recreational fishery, but I am not sure how it works. Please take the time to educate me on the mechanism you would propose to make this work.
As I have already stated, the Halibut issue is going to be a bit more complex than the HMS. I am aware of the quotas in effect for the dedicated halibut fishery, and bycatch from non-dedicated fisheries. I had a part time job doing Dock Side Monitoring of the fisheries, so I know how closely the fishery is monitored by DFO.

Now, it's funny you mention the price that these fish can bring!!!! At this time, that is what it is all about.................the MAXIMUM $$$$$ generated from the resource!!!! And if the Gov. allows a sportfishery, they feel they will not PROFIT from the sport/recreational harvest of the resource!!!!

Now, let me ask you this: since you are involved in the commercial fishery, do you feel the quotas are fair and/or sustainable? And/or do you feel from your first hand experience, that there is room for more harvest (higher quotas) in the fishery?
 

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Fish for the people, all the people, not just a select few. Else, not fishing for anyone.

Simplistic, probably unrealistic but hey that's just my 2 cents. If there is not a population to sustain the commercial fisherman, then perhaps they should not be there. Same goes for "recreational anglers", if the populations are not there we are not allowed to fish. To be honest with you it was a life long dream to become a commercial fisherman (for me), it doesn't even seem viable for me nor hardly possible to do so. The commercial fishery has way more problems than allowing a small percentage of recreational fisherman being allowed to catch a couple fish. If ya don't believe that, just come to Lunenburg sometime and ask. Large cooperations dictating lowest prices on quotas is likely to drive the industry all the way under if nothing else. Pricing the same as 10 years ago in a world where everythign goes up, except our value on fish. I'd say that could be the a large contributing cause for 'poaching' or illegal activities.

Again just a rant this morning.

Personally I would be all for a better structure of salt water recreational fishing. Including more oppertunities. If you think about it there would be absolutely no comparision in volume of fishes taken between the two activities, recreational certainly coming up shorter than the commercial aspect. Certainly a recreational fishery will infuse more cash flow into the economy as well. Governments love that obviously!

Trav
 

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As I have already stated, the Halibut issue is going to be a bit more complex than the HMS. I am aware of the quotas in effect for the dedicated halibut fishery, and bycatch from non-dedicated fisheries. I had a part time job doing Dock Side Monitoring of the fisheries, so I know how closely the fishery is monitored by DFO.

Now, it's funny you mention the price that these fish can bring!!!! At this time, that is what it is all about.................the MAXIMUM $$$$$ generated from the resource!!!! And if the Gov. allows a sportfishery, they feel they will not PROFIT from the sport/recreational harvest of the resource!!!!

Now, let me ask you this: since you are involved in the commercial fishery, do you feel the quotas are fair and/or sustainable? And/or do you feel from your first hand experience, that there is room for more harvest (higher quotas) in the fishery?
Unfortunately, the fishery is definitely monitored at different levels in different parts of the province. Although I do see some improvements recently.

To your point, shouldn't the maximum revenue being returned for the resource be the goal of the government? We have a resource that is managed by the federal government on the behalf of Canadians, shouldn't their goal be to maximize the economic and social returns on that resource?

I personally believe that we have some species where the quota is set too low and I believe we have some where the quota is set too high. I also believe that due to the increased workload placed on DFO scientists, we are not getting the proper amount of scientific work done on many of our important commercial stocks which is leading to many of the issues. Politics and fisheries management rarely match up, and unfortunately short-term placating of vocal minorities continues to happen at the expense of long-term sustainability. In many stocks and regions this is changing, but it will be an uphill on some key issues/stocks.
 

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To your point, shouldn't the maximum revenue being returned for the resource be the goal of the government? We have a resource that is managed by the federal government on the behalf of Canadians, shouldn't their goal be to maximize the economic and social returns on that resource?
I am all for maximizing the SOCIAL & ECONOMIC return of the resources! But by giving a select few the monopoly on the resource for monitary gain ($$$$)..........................that is NOT in the best interest of the residents of this province! Fair and equitable allocation of the resources for ALL, is in the best interest of the residents of the Province!

I should not have to buy local caught Halibut in a store at inflated retail prices, just to be able to eat a healthy meal. We all should have the access to the resources to feed our families a healthy meal once in a while!

Now, as a commercial fisherman, wouldn't you like the opportunity to go sportfishing and keep some fish for your family without having to deduct that fish from your commercial quota as non-saleable "CREW FISH"?
 

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I am all for maximizing the SOCIAL & ECONOMIC return of the resources! But by giving a select few the monopoly on the resource for monitary gain ($$$$)..........................that is NOT in the best interest of the residents of this province! Fair and equitable allocation of the resources for ALL, is in the best interest of the residents of the Province!

I should not have to buy local caught Halibut in a store at inflated retail prices, just to be able to eat a healthy meal. We all should have the access to the resources to feed our families a healthy meal once in a while!

Now, as a commercial fisherman, wouldn't you like to go sportfishing to keep some fish for your family without having to deduct that fish from your commercial quota as non-saleable "CREW FISH"?
Well, we are going to disagree on the point on whether that is in the best interests of the people of Canada. The fish are managed and owned by the people of Canada, not solely the people of Nova Scotia, and as such the social and economic returns must be looked at on a global scale not just provincially. The amount of money the fishing industry brings into this province in terms of landed value and employment remains a very large number that is often ignored by people outside the current primary areas of fishing effort. Those taxes paid by the enterprises and jobs created, especially in areas of high unemployment are a huge benefit to the people of Canada.

If you don't want to pay inflated retail prices, drop by a wharf and buy it from a boat. I'm sure fishermen would be glad to sell you some, plus you can hopefully ensure it's a nice fresh meal.

This isn't our grandparents fishery any more, there are strick rules and regulations and a very active compliance and enforcement program as required of any modern fisheries management program worldwide. I am not arguing against room for a recreational fishery, in fact many of the mechanisms are currently in place for one, but it must be made accountable just like the commercial fishery in terms of it's performance with regards to conservation and proper recording of information. Part of that process will include a decision on whether certain species are just too valuable or the negatives outweigh the positives in regards to an active recreational fishery and a decision will have to be made. I would suspect that a recreational halibut fishery at the moment would be too risky for my own level of risk-aversion, however you probably would have a different opinion.

I don't have a problem deducting the fish my crews take home from my commercial quota as I am "keeping it in the family" so to speak. I simply consider it a cost of doing business.
 

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Fish for the people, all the people, not just a select few. Else, not fishing for anyone.

Simplistic, probably unrealistic but hey that's just my 2 cents. If there is not a population to sustain the commercial fisherman, then perhaps they should not be there. Same goes for "recreational anglers", if the populations are not there we are not allowed to fish. To be honest with you it was a life long dream to become a commercial fisherman (for me), it doesn't even seem viable for me nor hardly possible to do so. The commercial fishery has way more problems than allowing a small percentage of recreational fisherman being allowed to catch a couple fish. If ya don't believe that, just come to Lunenburg sometime and ask. Large cooperations dictating lowest prices on quotas is likely to drive the industry all the way under if nothing else. Pricing the same as 10 years ago in a world where everythign goes up, except our value on fish. I'd say that could be the a large contributing cause for 'poaching' or illegal activities.

Again just a rant this morning.

Personally I would be all for a better structure of salt water recreational fishing. Including more oppertunities. If you think about it there would be absolutely no comparision in volume of fishes taken between the two activities, recreational certainly coming up shorter than the commercial aspect. Certainly a recreational fishery will infuse more cash flow into the economy as well. Governments love that obviously!

Trav
Trav, I apologize for missing your reply earlier.

I think you're misunderstanding some of my points. Our resources off our coasts are not all in bad shape, just like any ecosystem some are up and some are down.

Yes a lot of effort has left some ports in Nova Scotia, but other ports have thrived. The species mix out in the ocean right now is very different than it was only a few decades ago, crustaceans(Lobster/Crab/etc...) and dogfish are thriving while some of the groundfish and pelagic stocks are struggling. It is all cyclic. There is only so much biomass carrying capacity out there, and we can't hope to decide what we should have in the ocean consuming that energy.

If you are serious about being a commercial fisherman, then I actually believe that there are plenty of opportunities out there, although many are fraught with risk and will require a long term commitment to make them successful. I don't think it will happen overnight as I believe like any job you need to work your way up and there are never any guarantees.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, we are going to disagree on the point on whether that is in the best interests of the people of Canada. The fish are managed and owned by the people of Canada, not solely the people of Nova Scotia, and as such the social and economic returns must be looked at on a global scale not just provincially. The amount of money the fishing industry brings into this province in terms of landed value and employment remains a very large number that is often ignored by people outside the current primary areas of fishing effort. Those taxes paid by the enterprises and jobs created, especially in areas of high unemployment are a huge benefit to the people of Canada.

If you don't want to pay inflated retail prices, drop by a wharf and buy it from a boat. I'm sure fishermen would be glad to sell you some, plus you can hopefully ensure it's a nice fresh meal.

This isn't our grandparents fishery any more, there are strick rules and regulations and a very active compliance and enforcement program as required of any modern fisheries management program worldwide. I am not arguing against room for a recreational fishery, in fact many of the mechanisms are currently in place for one, but it must be made accountable just like the commercial fishery in terms of it's performance with regards to conservation and proper recording of information. Part of that process will include a decision on whether certain species are just too valuable or the negatives outweigh the positives in regards to an active recreational fishery and a decision will have to be made. I would suspect that a recreational halibut fishery at the moment would be too risky for my own level of risk-aversion, however you probably would have a different opinion.

I don't have a problem deducting the fish my crews take home from my commercial quota as I am "keeping it in the family" so to speak. I simply consider it a cost of doing business.
Well, it's like you stated.............we are just going to have too agree to dissagree on some of these issues!

Now, IMO, the first problem we have is that our fisheries are managed on the Federal level, when they should be managed at the provincial level. Since you also mentioned that the economic impacts are on the provintial side of the coin, and IMO, should be managed on the provincial level.

I do not want a "FREE FOR ALL SPORT FISHERY". I want something that is going to be managed properly, so it is sustainable for years to come!!!!

Also, it is funny toy mention the "HIGH UNENPLOYMENT" in some areas!!!!! There are lots of Lobster Fisherman in my area who only fish a short 2 month season, then draw FULL unemployment benafits for the rest of the year after clearing $80, 000 dollars in the short season. They also employ their wife, and 2 kids as crew members, then write their wages off as a business expence!!! Then their wife and 2 kids also draw full unemplyment for the rest of the year!!!! So that is an $80,000 clear anunal income, plus 4 people on FULL EI benafits for the rest of the year. Not a bad living as I see it!!!! Why should a family that clears $80, 000 a season be allowed to collect full unemployment for the rest of the year? There are also some guys who work for FREE durring the 2 month season just to be able to collect full EI for the remainder of the year????


Anyhow, this conversation just shows how much of a struggle this is going to be to get a small piece of the pie! There is going to be strong opposition from most of the commercial sector because they feel they should have all of the pie, and most are not willing to share!!!!!
 

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Well, it's like you stated.............we are just going to have too agree to dissagree on some of these issues!

Now, IMO, the first problem we have is that our fisheries are managed on the Federal level, when they should be managed at the provincial level. Since you also mentioned that the economic impacts are on the provintial side of the coin, and IMO, should be managed on the provincial level.

I do not want a "FREE FOR ALL SPORT FISHERY". I want something that is going to be managed properly, so it is sustainable for years to come!!!!

Also, it is funny toy mention the "HIGH UNENPLOYMENT" in some areas!!!!! There are lots of Lobster Fisherman in my area who only fish a short 2 month season, then draw FULL unemployment benafits for the rest of the year after clearing $80, 000 dollars in the short season. They also employ their wife, and 2 kids as crew members, then write their wages off as a business expence!!! Then their wife and 2 kids also draw full unemplyment for the rest of the year!!!! So that is an $80,000 clear anunal income, plus 4 people on FULL EI benafits for the rest of the year. Not a bad living as I see it!!!! Why should a family that clears $80, 000 a season be allowed to collect full unemployment for the rest of the year? There are also some guys who work for FREE durring the 2 month season just to be able to collect full EI for the remainder of the year????


Anyhow, this conversation just shows how much of a struggle this is going to be to get a small piece of the pie! There is going to be strong opposition from most of the commercial sector because they feel they should have all of the pie, and most are not willing to share!!!!!
Unemployment and transfer payments are done at the federal level, also since many of these stocks of fish cross international or interprovincial boundaries, the fishing industry must be managed at the federal level. I completely agree with your problem with the abuse of the employment insurance system and I believe it is a huge problem and must be fixed. Some international trade organizations have even looked at it as a form of subsidy for the fishing industry. However, this is in no way related to the discussion on offshore sportfishing.

Again, I am simply trying to understand your point of view. This does not mean I am willing to share no pieces of the pie irregardless of the size. However, I would not sacrifice the health of my business that employs and sustains multiple families so that we can risk the long-term sustainability of our resources with a poorly developed and managed sportfishing exercise. Many of these issues would need to be resolved.
 

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Unemployment and transfer payments are done at the federal level, also since many of these stocks of fish cross international or interprovincial boundaries, the fishing industry must be managed at the federal level. I completely agree with your problem with the abuse of the employment insurance system and I believe it is a huge problem and must be fixed. Some international trade organizations have even looked at it as a form of subsidy for the fishing industry. However, this is in no way related to the discussion on offshore sportfishing.

Again, I am simply trying to understand your point of view. This does not mean I am willing to share no pieces of the pie irregardless of the size. However, I would not sacrifice the health of my business that employs and sustains multiple families so that we can risk the long-term sustainability of our resources with a poorly developed and managed sportfishing exercise. Many of these issues would need to be resolved.
I think it is ridiculous to have a commercial fisherman tell , that I should't be able to go out on my boat and catch a halibut. I should be able to take one a trip and this amount will not be a drop in the bucket as far the amount that is snuck ashore by the criminal element inside the commercial fishery.

To have someone tell me that I should not be allowed to catch a few fish is infuraiting, whether the debate is healthy or not.

Take a look around and see what the response looks and sounds like from my point of view.
 

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I think it is ridiculous to have a commercial fisherman tell , that I should't be able to go out on my boat and catch a halibut. I should be able to take one a trip and this amount will not be a drop in the bucket as far the amount that is snuck ashore by the criminal element inside the commercial fishery.

To have someone tell me that I should not be allowed to catch a few fish is infuraiting, whether the debate is healthy or not.

Take a look around and see what the response looks and sounds like from my point of view.
While I don't profess to know both sides of the story...it is rather simplistic to me. One guy catching one fish every once in a while is IMHO no where near a drastic threat to the offshore fishery of any kind. I think that someone quoted 37,000+ fish were needed to get close to the quota. Is that just for one license/ship? How many commercial halibut/Shark/BFT licenses are there? Let's do the real math here...I'm guessing that someone suggested that if 37,000+ fish were caught recreationally off the coast of Nova Scotia that this would have an impact on the species. Let's get real here...thats like 100 people taking one fish everyday of the year. Of course thats assuming you actually catch a fish every trip....I know I don't. I would bet you there wouldn't be any where near that much interest in Halibut/Shark/BFT to make that kind of impact...yet a commercial fisherman/men could take that much in a 2 month period...I'm really confused as to the math you guys are trying to work out here. I think that there is room for a recreational fishery...maybe a license or permit to help regulate it may help or as in the case of Stripers, no permit required but you can only take one keeper per day. I think the $$$$ behind all this is where it gets peoples nuts in an uproar. I like halibut/shark/bft! I want to catch them and eat them for my family and I. Period end of story! It's not rocket science!
 

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While I don't profess to know both sides of the story...it is rather simplistic to me. One guy catching one fish every once in a while is IMHO no where near a drastic threat to the offshore fishery of any kind. I think that someone quoted 37,000+ fish were needed to get close to the quota. Is that just for one license/ship? How many commercial halibut/Shark/BFT licenses are there? Let's do the real math here...I'm guessing that someone suggested that if 37,000+ fish were caught recreationally off the coast of Nova Scotia that this would have an impact on the species. Let's get real here...thats like 100 people taking one fish everyday of the year. Of course thats assuming you actually catch a fish every trip....I know I don't. I would bet you there wouldn't be any where near that much interest in Halibut/Shark/BFT to make that kind of impact...yet a commercial fisherman/men could take that much in a 2 month period...I'm really confused as to the math you guys are trying to work out here. I think that there is room for a recreational fishery...maybe a license or permit to help regulate it may help or as in the case of Stripers, no permit required but you can only take one keeper per day. I think the $$$$ behind all this is where it gets peoples nuts in an uproar. I like halibut/shark/bft! I want to catch them and eat them for my family and I. Period end of story! It's not rocket science!
The quota is currently set at the highest it has been for at least the past decade and higher than average total landings through out the 90s at 1,700 mt (3,747,820 lbs). In 2000, the quota was 1,000 mt (2,204,600 lbs).

That is 3,747,820 lbs of total halibut for ALL fishing vessels from Nova Scotia (excluding the Gulf) and Southern Newfoundland. Anything caught by the recreational fishery would have to be removed from that number. It may seem like a big number, but it really isn't when you consider you can easily catch it, the value of the fish is very high as I explained earlier ($6-$12/lb to the vessel), plus a fish can weigh in excess 200 lbs. The incentive to land it illegally, or to use recreational boats as an easy way to bring commercially caught halibut ashore without paying the dockside monitoring or commercial quota/license fees.
 

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I think it is ridiculous to have a commercial fisherman tell , that I should't be able to go out on my boat and catch a halibut. I should be able to take one a trip and this amount will not be a drop in the bucket as far the amount that is snuck ashore by the criminal element inside the commercial fishery.

To have someone tell me that I should not be allowed to catch a few fish is infuraiting, whether the debate is healthy or not.

Take a look around and see what the response looks and sounds like from my point of view.
The criminal element in the fishery is exactly one of the concerns commercial fishermen would have.

You can't go in on land and shoot and kill anything you want to eat or cut any tree you'd like just because you want to.
 

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You can't go in on land and shoot and kill anything you want to eat or cut any tree you'd like just because you want to.
YOU ARE INCORRECT!!!!! YES you can......................with the proper licencing, you can hunt during the open season, and you can cut your own firewood on crown land!!!!!
 

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YOU ARE INCORRECT!!!!! YES you can......................with the proper licencing, you can hunt during the open season, and you can cut your own firewood on crown land!!!!!
I must be mistaken, I honestly believe that there are some species in our woods we weren't allowed to hunt during any season...

Comparing that to the fishery, you're permitted to go get flounder, haddock, cod, pollock, mackerel, etc... Some species just wouldn't be as easy, halibut is one of them.
 

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I don't think anyone is advocating for an all-out,"anything goes" kind of recreational saltwater fishing. I just want what my fellow Canadians on the Pacific coast enjoy, which is a licensed, well-regulated, and closely monitored recreational saltwater fishing. If the DFO can reconcile different interests in the Pacific coast, I'm sure it can do it for the Atlantic--it is, after all, the same federal department.

I'm not necessarily after tuna or halibut, though it would be nice to chase them if the fishery is sustainable, but I do think there is something seriously wrong when commercial fishing consistently takes precedence over recreational fishing for no other reason than political expediency.
 
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