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How many flies can you fish at one time in Nova Scotia?
If you are talking about in a fly fishing only or salmon, etc. area - the answer is two hooks. That would be one double hook, or two single hook flies(see page 57 of the Angling Guide) - the set-up is referred to as a "dropper" where you have a fly tied on the end of your leader and another trailing that one.
There are areas of NS that are "single hook lure", so that would be one fly, and then in the salt I don't think there is any limitation - a 5 fly mackerel set-up being common.
Hope that helps,
Bill
 

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Are you asking how many by law? Bill answered that one but if your asking how many flies I can fish the answer is one. Any more than that is a tangled mess!
 

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If you are talking about in a fly fishing only or salmon, etc. area - the answer is two hooks. That would be one double hook, or two single hook flies(see page 57 of the Angling Guide)
Bill
Hi Bill
But for general fishing on page 54 it says "angle in non-tidal water........snip.......with a fishing line having more than 3 separate hooks"
and on page 57 again "hook, single, double or treble hook .... on one shank"
Perhaps the book was written by a committee!
Time they got you to rewrite the rules!
Have a nice day
Paul
 

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I was wondering about the dropper system for trout cause I never see anybody fish like that.
Hi PW
I learned to fly fish with an old Italian guy. He always used the dropper system with 3 flies. Never cast very far either. about 1/4 the length we see anglers cast today but he caught trout. If one rose, there was no turning back - it was in the creel or we didn't go home! No C&R for that lad!
I'm like Perry - it always ended in a snarled mess for me!
Paul
 

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Is there a differance between tying to the eye of the hook or the bend (whats better?)
Well PW most anglers tie to the eye - however if using spade hooks they must be tied to the bend or shaft. Eyed hooks can be tied that way also but it kind of defeats the reason for the eye. There is a new quick release hook out where the eye is down on the bend. not likely to be a big seller.
The spade hooks are nice though and are easy to tie - there are some very nice ones designed for carp that work well on trout. They are designed for bait like corn or maggots. I use them for small tubes. Nice hooks.
Enjoy the cold
Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well PW most anglers tie to the eye - however if using spade hooks they must be tied to the bend or shaft. Eyed hooks can be tied that way also but it kind of defeats the reason for the eye. There is a new quick release hook out where the eye is down on the bend. not likely to be a big seller.
The spade hooks are nice though and are easy to tie - there are some very nice ones designed for carp that work well on trout. They are designed for bait like corn or maggots. I use them for small tubes. Nice hooks.
Enjoy the cold
Paul
What do spade hooks look like?
 

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Is there a differance between tying to the eye of the hook or the bend (whats better?)
Hi;

Because of casting problems, few people use a triple fly 'cast',[i.e., tippet rig], anymore, tho' it used to be, when I was young, a popular way to swing [down and across] wet flies on trout streams. Most wet flies then were bought already snelled, which meant you had to make a 'loop to loop' connection between the leader and the snelled fly. As has been mentioned, this caused a lot of tangling, even with short roll casts. Eventually most people opted to use these pre-snelled flies for lake trolling only, where the line could be fed out, not cast.

Today two-fly 'casts'[rigs] are popular, especially among western rainbow still-water fishers. They first tie a dry fly to their line to serve as a 'bite indicator', then take more tippet material and tie a length of that [anything from 3 to 24 ft.!!] to the bend in the dry fly hook. The other end they tie to a wet fly, usually a nymph. For long tippets I guess they must feed out the line from their belly boat, canoe, or whatever. I've never seen it done.

For short tippet 'casts', say 18" to 3', I have found that tying the tippet directly to the bend of the leading fly, then to the eye of the following, makes it easier to cast without tangles. I don't know if it would help with 3 fly rigs.

Some people fish a wet or nymph in front of a streamer with the same rig. Always make sure the heaviest fly is on the end. Such as a wet followed by a weighted nymph.

I haven't fished this way for many years, as for a very long time I did not fly fish anymore. I'm just re-starting, so I stick to single flies, and will avoid multi-fly 'casts'[rigs] until I get the swing [pun intended] of it back. If you insist on doing it, then I suggest that you use barbless hooks.


cheers,

chuck
 

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HI all,
I actually still use a dropper sometimes - my grandfather used to do this as well, so it's one of those tradition things. The one I really like is a "dropper dry" combo. This has a dry fly on the "top" and a wet below (usually a nymph) which gives me two shots at non-rising trout.
I read an article about it recently here
Hope that helps,
Bill

ps - this, as others have said, is for short distance casting only, or more typically letting it drift down-stream - not for long range casting!
 
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