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Members of the NovaScotiaFishing.com (NSF.com) website have expressed repeated concerns about the spread of invasive species throughout Nova Scotia and their impact on native fauna, especially salmonids. For the purposes of this commentary, "invasive species" will be defined, without limitation, to include chain pickerel (Esox niger) and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui).

The full document can be viewed by clicking here

Special thanks to all of those who took part in making this document (Pmorris, Bugman, Perry, and anyone else who contributed).
 

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I think it looks great as well. Hopefully some of these methods can be put into play at some point eventually. Especially if we pass it along to our local wildlife organizations, habitat groups, researchers ect.I passed along a copy via email to someone in the Mersey-Tobeatic Research Insitiute (MTRI), they were quite interested in viewing it.They do quite a few research projects involving forests, coasts , wetlands ect. on everything from red oaks to flying squirrels. They said its definitly something they might look into at some point. Here is there website if anyone is interested http://www.merseytobeatic.ca/

There actually has been an official invasive species website for nova scotia launched. Its http://www.invasivespeciesns.ca/ , they have a link for smallmouth bass and a host of other nova scotia invasives but nothing for pickerel that i can see. Perhaps they would be interested in seeing a copy of the document.

While i was looking for the above site i also found this other one which was of of the most descriptive ones concerning smallmouth bass i have ever seen.

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:zwkpQawebQ0J:www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/Library/337846.pdf+smallmouth+bass+mersey+river&cd=7&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca&client=firefox-a#25

Something interesting in it (page 33). Apparently some studies indicate there is a relationship between crayfish levels and the number of fish consumed. When crayfish are numerous the amount of fish in the diet goes down. An examination of 72 snake river bass larger then 100mm indicated a diet of 86% crayfish and 11% fish. Anyway i don't know how true it is, a lot of the site indicates widespread negative impacts on minnows and other fish.Some of the areas where impacts are being noted have plenty of crayfish species in them as well. I have heard elsewhere that in some salmon rivers out west studies indicate that high levels of crayfish mean less predation of salmonids(bass apparently preferring crayfish because they are easier to catch). Something such as this would definitly be prehaps worthy of a future study at the very least as it might provide a way to lessen the bass's impact here in Nova Scotia in certain systems by introducing a healthy, numerous crayfish population.

Anyway I would just like to say once again that the members who drew up the document did an excellant job and hopefully something positive will come of this in the future.
 

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A very interesting read, indeed. Well researched and comprehensive. Excellent collaborative effort. BRAVO!! to all those members who contributed both time and energy during the gestation of this report, again, BRAVO ZULU, WELL DONE!!!
 

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Dmurry, that is an interesting thought!! One that I never considered and other than introducing another alien species looks on paper as reasonal.
 
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