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I was wondering what you guys thought about how important line size is?

Some people say the bigger the line the easier fish see it and going up or down just one size can make a huge difference. A guy I know uses 10 pound test for everything, whether it is brook trout, bass, mackeral he sticks with it. I have heard this is fairly big line for brook trout but he seems to catch the same as the rest of us using 6 pound line. Do you guys think it makes a huge difference?
 

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I was using 8lb trilene extra tough line for most of my fishing, including trout. It is a dark colour and you could see it for miles in the water. I switched to the Trilene Sensation 6lb line and it's way less visible. I noticed a huge difference in the number of fish I was hooking after I changed line. Not quite the same as line size but definitely if you can tell the difference in size in the water then the fish can too.
 

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this reminded me of something ive read by Kirk Deeter,"7x is for sissies!" His point was not to use line size as a crutch. If you concentrate on how you present the lure/fly with heavier line you have a better chance of landing the big one.

i once took a friend fishing for smallies,i wonderd why he wasnt getting any bites while i was catchin tons,he had brought 20 pound line...
 

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Hey Grasshopper,

Line size has always been a hot topic, especially with fluff chuckers. There are times when a 2lb tippet is the only way to take fussy trout, when that happens I fish for something else until the critters come to their senses. Other times I've been using spinnerbaits on 10lb test and getting broke off by suicidal smallies, finally ending up switching to 17lb line to land them.
In most cases water clarity and lure presentation dictate the line you should be using. I've landed 6lb shad on 4lb test, not because I wanted to but because that was the only way to present the smaller shad darts they liked in the deeper runs to get to them. From my own experience, light line will get you more bites. It's harder to see and the smaller baits used with it will have better action, and you'll be able to cast them farther. Today you have more choices than ever for good quality mono, not to mention all the wonderful braided lines that are being produced. I've fished with line so small in diameter it was like sewing thread, and yet had the breaking strength of 5lb test mono. That stuff is really great at making long casts to spooky trout in shallow water, and you can feel ever little tick and bump even on a light weight rod. Generally, if you use fresh water spinning gear, keep the line less than 10lb test. Baitcasters prefer lines 10-20lbs, although I find most of mine perform best with 12lb in the majority of my fishing. I do have one rod loaded with 40lb braid to fish lily pads with topwater frogs for big smallies, but you need that kind of muscle to get the fish out of the jungle. It's really up to your style of fishing, if you like ultra-light gear and trout in small streams, or giant stripers and surf rods, you're going to be using very different line. Keep in mind that you can land very large fish on light line if the conditions are right, but not many bragging sized trout will take a bait on line made for halibut fishing. Above all else, don't scrimp on quality line. Cheap line is only going to cause more headaches than it's worth. Buy the good stuff, stock up when it's on sale, and change it every year, more often if you fish hard. That way, you'll always be ready for that next trophy.
 

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I agree with Darren with one exception. If you pay the money for a quality superline, (Power Pro, Fireline, Sufix), you do not need to change it every year unless it is badly frayed along its whole length, otherwise a simple trim of several feet will do the job of clearing out the worn spots. Monofilament line, on the other hand, is degraded by UV rays in sunlight, thus the need for annual replacement. The more expensive Power Pro and Fluorocarbon are unaffected by sunlight. As Darren said, with superlines you have the added benefit of a very small strength to diameter ratio (its about 3:1) which means a 12 lb weight could be lifted with a superline of about 4lb mono diameter and virtually no stretch. Regards....
 

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I match the line with the rod. I have 2 rods, a medium with 8Lb Berkley Sensation and an ultra light with 4Lb Berkley Flourocarbon. Every rod had a line rating and I usually split the differance. Say your rod calls for 6-10Lb, which most medium rods do, I use 8Lb.

Matching line on spinning rods and tipped for flies is completely different. I've never had any issues catching fish on spinning gear no matter what I was using for line size. I match the line for the rod and lure size I'm using. If you have a medium rod which calls for 6-10Lb line that will cast a 3/16 to 5/8 lure, you wouldn't want to cast the 5/8 lure with a 6Lb line and a 3/16 lure would cast better with the lighter line. Most of the lures are 1/4oz that I use on my medium rod, so I use 8Lb.
 

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Yes Shimanoman, I was only talking about mono and not superlines or fluorocarbon, which are not cheap anywhere you shop. Most fishing situations can be handled with the new types of mono now available. Also keep in mind that mono floats, the other lines tend to sink. I prefer mono for all my topwater fishing, it allows the baits to work better and is less likely to foul in the hooks.
And Woolybugger, some rods are rated for breaking strength, others for line diameter. It can be hard to tell what the rod makers mean when they print all those fancy numbers on their sticks. Lure weight is the best indicator of a rods action and performance. I can cast a 1/4oz lure with 20lb braid (6lb dia), but I could end up breaking my rod. Have you ever tried using 4lb test on a 7ft spinning rod? Works great for river fishing but you have to be careful not to overpower the cast or you end up breaking off a lot of lures, and hard striking fish can snap your line with the added leverage. Sometimes it's just a matter of trail and error to find just the right match of line/lure size, despite what's printed on your rod. Even then, one brand of mono may work better than another, even if their properties are the same. I always loved Stren on my ultralite gear, but they've changed the formula and it's just not the same now. And if you ever see Oland line on sale at Canadian Tire, usually for $2 a spool, pick some up and give it a try. For the price I haven't found anything better for heavy cover fishing. It casts great and is really tough.
 
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