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I've been thinking about it for a couple years now and haven't really had the spare cash. I'm curious if I were to buy a decent kayak geared up for fishing how much that would cost? I'm not sure what extra would need to be bought so if anyone wanted to let me know plus what the total cost would be approximately I'd appreciate it

Thanks.
 

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I bought my Ocean Kayak Big Game Prowler last year for just under $1000. You can fish from it as is but you will want to add rod holders and mybe even a fish finder at some time. As a fishing platform it cannot be beaten. It is slower than a touring kayak but the extra stability is worth it
 

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I too,can vouch for the Ocean Big Game Prowler's stability.....Regards...
 

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There are very many good reasons to get a sit-on-top kayak. But, there are a few good reasons to use a touring kayak for fishing.

If you plan to fish early or late in the season then a touring kayak will keep you warmer.

If you plan to fish the open ocean, or cross open water, in cold or rough wether then a touring kayak will really shine.

If you plan to paddle long distances, a touring kayak will take less effort (at a given speed) and so you will get tired less quickly.

Touring kayaks have less primary stability, so they do feel "tippy". But, most have better secondary stability (because you sit in it and have a lower centre of gravity & because of certain design features) so they are actually harder to tip over completely once you are fully seated. The disconcerted feeling of tippyness goes away very quickly. Remember when you started to learn to ride a bicycle? The bicycle felt very tippy at first, but once you learn to ride a bike you are stable and can zip around quite nimbly! Same thing with a touring kayak; it just takes a little time.

Owners of sit-on-top kayaks can tell you about the very many good qualities they have. I just wanted to make the point that in some cases a touring kayak is a good option as a fishing platform.
 

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Both styles definitely have their advantages. JB covered all of the touring kayak advantages and after fishing from my sea kayak I'd have to agree with him. I'm using an Ocean Kayak sit on top now but I really do miss the speed of a touring boat. That said, a sit on top is a great choice depending on what you are going to do with it. This is all my opinion so take it with a grain of salt:

Get a touring kayak if:
- You want decent speed and ease of paddling
- You plan to cover long distances on your outings
- You are an experienced paddler already

Get a sit-on-top if:
- You want to stand up or sit side-saddle to cast
- You plan on carrying a lot of gear or gadgets
- You want total confidence in your primary stability

It's very true that you will be a lot drier in a touring kayak, and it extends your fishing season into the early spring and late fall, but you can do this in a sit on top as well, you just need to purchase some immersion protection. I'm using a pair of Kokatat dry pants with an enclosed sock and a semi-dry top, which lets you layer up in the cold weather and stay toasty-dry and still hang your legs over the side.

I will say I partially regret buying such a wide barge of a kayak, as I already had a lot of paddling experience and would have loved something much faster, the problem is there are very few fishing kayaks for sale in NS.

If you manage to find something like an Ocean Kayak trident 15 or something along those lines, they are much much faster than the big game while retaining a lot of the stability. There is one for sale on kijiji for 699 I believe, and if I could get rid of this big game I would buy it in a second.
 

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It will be good for lakes, rivers and other protected waters. At 40lbs it should be easy to get on and off the top of a car by yourself. There are lots of options in this category (recreational kayak), so it might prove useful to look around and compare features among other kayaks in the same category.

Good luck.
 

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My Daughter uses the non-angler version of the Pursuit, you would not be dissapointed.
I have an 11' rec kayak that I outfitted myself, the boat was 650.00 and add ons for fishing were well under 100.00, and I have tried an ocean big game (( big mistake )) because now I want one too.

Greg.
 

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For me, purchasing a kayak depends of many things... those things are different for each person in the sense that my answer to the list of things may be different from yours.

  • how much do you weigh or how much gear do you plan on bringing with you at any one time?
  • what type of fishing are you looking at doing or is it just for paddling? (smallmouth, trout, saltwater species etc...)
  • What type of water are you taking it in.. fast or relatively calm water (lakes or rivers or salt)
  • do you mind getting wet (an added expense with any yak is the paddling cloathing that will make a trip far more comfortable)
  • How much modification do you want to do? (are you willing to drill holes in the yak, some yaks come with rod holders etc so you won't have to)
  • is price an issue? (how much are you willing to spend)
  • is weight of the yak an issue? (are you able to lift the yak to put it on a roof rack or trailer)
  • what is your height? (this will cross off a lot of yaks if you are tall... if you are short then a long yak may not be as easy to maneuver)
  • are you going to be paddling with others who already own yaks (you will see the pros and cons of these vessels sooner than you will with one you purchase by reading about it)
I am sure that there are many other points that need to be addressed but this will give you a good check list to go down after you have answered them to see what type of yak you want to get into. SOT's and SIK's have pros and cons and if you have the money I can give you great selections for both so you might as well buy one of each..lol.. If you are like me then money is an issue and you will have to pick one of them..

A key in my mind and I have said this before many times.. what ever yak you decide to get.. get one with a rudder... you won't regret this decision.
 

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I've been thinking about it for a couple years now and haven't really had the spare cash. I'm curious if I were to buy a decent kayak geared up for fishing how much that would cost? I'm not sure what extra would need to be bought so if anyone wanted to let me know plus what the total cost would be approximately I'd appreciate it

Thanks.
Hi,
Out at Old Creel in Waverly I got the following:

Thule Roofracks (excellent)
Tie downs
An 11 foot / 28" wide Aquafusion kayak..they are excellent..http://www.aquafusion.com/models.htm
A fishing rod holder that took me 5 minutes to install
Paddle

It cost $1000.

Talk to Allan..he's excellent. If you go tell him Paul highly recommended them.
 

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Yakker, that's the same outfit I have, I also installed 2 flush rod holders behind the seat.

Greg
Do you like it Greg? I have been out a few times..I really like it. Still getting used to it. Not sure I'd want to go out in the North Atlantic with it! I want to go down the river on the other side of Kinsac with it.
 

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I'm very pleased with it, and you're right about old creel, great to deal with. I also added a skeg, paddled it before and after, made a big difference with tracking in the wind.

Greg
 

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I'm very pleased with it, and you're right about old creel, great to deal with. I also added a skeg, paddled it before and after, made a big difference with tracking in the wind.

Greg
Was the skeg easy to install? I want to rig up an anchor somehow.
 
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