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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked up my first fishing license ever and I have a few questions that I was hoping people with experience could answer.

1. I have the report card that I'm supposed to fill out but each species only has 1 box by each county. How to I check off multiple catches on different days?

2. how far should I put the swivel from the bobber? do I even need to use a swivel?

3. how much line should I put between the hook and swivel?

4. how do I know which hook to use and what kind of bait?

5. can I fish anywhere I want with a general license?

6. what is a spinner for? when do I use it? how do I attach it.

7. where do I place the sinkers and how many do I use?

I'm starting to feel like there's a lot more to fishing than just dropping your line in the water and relaxing. I really don't want to get in any trouble for breaking the rules and I also want to use everything the right way. Seems like there's a lot of study that goes into fishing.
 

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OK, congrats on deciding to start fishing. It's an amazing past time that will eventually consume most your life if you allow it.

Now first things first. What are gonna try catch? Trout, bass, perch, pickerel? and where are you planning to fish? Lake, river, stream, pond? on shore or in a boat?

If these questions stump you then maybe I can make a few suggestions. In my opinion the two easiest ways to go get your first fish are either a smallmouth bass from shore on a lake, or a brook trout in a little stream in the woods. These two fish are readily available and will generally bite at any time.

You're right in the fact that there is a lot of studying to do in fishing, but for the most part this just comes as you get more and more into it. The longer you fish the more serious you get at it the more you'll look into studying things like time of day, weather, time of year etc etc.

But to start off you can't go wrong with trying for a bass in a lake that has them, or finding a little forested stream and catch some trout. Most little streams the trout aren't really large but it's still fun to catch a few.

So for the trout in a stream: rig your line as such: tie a swivel to the end of the line (look up some good fishing knots online rather than just tying it on any old way). Attach a nice flashy spinner to the swivel (nothing overly large, small and simple is good). Put a hook on the spinner if it doesn't have one, and put a chunk of worm on the hook (check your angling rule book first to see if live bait (worms/minnows etc.) are legal, some rivers they are not allowed to be used. Depending on the depth of water, size of lure setup and speed of current you might want some split shot, test and adjust, it works fine right in front of the swivel. Find a nice deep looking spot in the stream, like under a cut out bank, under a stump or tree, any nice hiding spot. Cast in and retrieve slowly till something bites it!

For bass its even easier. Get a hard bodied lure like a Rapala from C Tire or walmart (doesn't have to be Rapala though, they're $$$). Attach that to the spinner cast into a lake around rocks, weed beds, trees etc and crank it in. Twitch it along the way. Depending on where you are you may have bass all around you or maybe not at all.

Hope this gets ya started.

The biggest tip I can give ya though is this: DON'T GET DISCOURAGED! It's called fishing, not catching. Some days you'll get some others you'll get nothing all day.

So, let us know where you're fishing at too.

Good luck

Dave
 

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Hi, Welcome to the wonderful world of angling. The first thing I would suggest would be to invest about $15.00 in a paperback book called "Fishing For Dummies" There is a huge amount of advice in it.(knots,regulations,lines,lures,spinners,worms, live baits, hooks, soft plastics, swivels, sinkers, you get the picture, it's about 300 pages and all good advice.) I have been an avid angler for over 50 years and every time I look through this book, I still learn something. It can save you a lot of money and heartache. Use Google. Get a friend who has some experience as an angler and then you have a mentor. Last of all, remember, it is a lifetime of learning and have fun. Regards.......
 

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Hi, Welcome to the wonderful world of angling. The first thing I would suggest would be to invest about $15.00 in a paperback book called "Fishing For Dummies" There is a huge amount of advice in it.(knots,regulations,lines,lures,spinners,worms, live baits, hooks, soft plastics, swivels, sinkers, you get the picture, it's about 300 pages and all good advice.) I have been an avid angler for over 50 years and every time I look through this book, I still learn something. It can save you a lot of money and heartache. Use Google. Get a friend who has some experience as an angler and then you have a mentor. Last of all, remember, it is a lifetime of learning and have fun. Regards.......
Great advice,when it comes to angling you never stop learning...well at least I haven't yet!
 

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Where do you live? If you live near a member of these forums perhaps they'd take you out for a trip and show you a few things (much easier than describing in text)

You should definitely have a look through your angler's handbook you got when you bought your license, as that has all of the bag/size limits and seasons per species. Now to quickly answer your questions:

1. I have the report card that I'm supposed to fill out but each species only has 1 box by each county. How to I check off multiple catches on different days?
--->you should keep a journal separate from this card, then at the end of the year right in the number of fish rather than check marks

2. how far should I put the swivel from the bobber? do I even need to use a swivel?
--->It really depends what you're fishing for and how deep the water is. If it's deep water you can experiment. Shallow water you want to make sure your bait isn't sitting on bottom.

3. how much line should I put between the hook and swivel?
--->I always use this kind of swivel so i can switch between lures and hooks quickly it clips open and shut


4. how do I know which hook to use and what kind of bait?
--->That really depends on what/where/when you're fishing. It's best to experiment and/or get a fishing buddy that has experience to help you. It's very dependent on the conditions.

5. can I fish anywhere I want with a general license?
--->In the angler's handbook it will tell you which places are off limits and some places you can't use live bait etc.

6. what is a spinner for? when do I use it? how do I attach it.
--->A spinner shines in the water and gets the fish's attention, then it comes over and smells the worm and gobbles it up!

7. where do I place the sinkers and how many do I use?
--->I don't often use sinkers, but it depends .. I use them to cast further sometimes if I want to reach a certain spot. Also like somebody said, it depends how fast the water is moving as well

Hopefully these help, and like I said.. find a mentor!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, I'll be honest. I don't care about fish in the least. I was just looking for a relaxing way to kill my time. I really don't want to study at all, that's not relaxing to me. Do I really have to look up each and every place I fish to find out the rules? I started to read the first response but once it gone down to talking about the swivel I just said "forget it, fishing doesn't sound relaxing at all. I still have no clue how to even use to stuff I have" so thanks and everything, but it doesn't sound like I'm going to enjoy it. You guys seemed to try your best to help but I still don't know the answers to my questions. Last year I went to some place that supplied everything you needed and it was semi enjoyable. I caught 1 fish (no clue what kind) but what I didn't like was all the other people around so I thought I would like it if I could go by myself.

I just wanted to throw a worm in the water and wait. Report cards, needing to know the species of fish, needing to know rules for each place I fish, needing to know the depth of the water, etc etc. It's all just way to much for me Thanks and everything though.
 

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Follow Gregory's advice. You really don't want to go fishing at all. All you seem to want is an excuse to justify going off by yourself, finding a beautiful spot by a watercourse, sitting down, and doing absolutely nothing. If the latter is the case, always keep a rod fully rigged in your car so that when you park, you can step out (in case someone is watching)with a purposeful air, reach in, grasp your rod, and stride, with a great deal of confidence, into the woods with it. When you arrive at your chosen spot, set up the rod, (sans hook) but with bobber attached and in the water, and look intently off into the middle distance. Should someone come across you doing this, most will not interrupt you in your reverie. Those who do ask the question "Any luck??" can be answered with "No, Just got here" This will usually satisfy them and then they will go away so you may continue doing nothing without them discovering your ruse. Have a nice time. BTW, if you don't have a hook on your line you are not actually fishing and you don't need to purchase a license. Regards......
 

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I find myself getting extremely stressed each time I attempt to look at this handbook I got.

What's making it so hard for me to learn is the terminology. plus all the variables. I can't stand words like "it depends" When I say it's my first time I mean IT'S MY FIRST TIME.

I've asked so many people questions and I'm still just as confused as I was before I started asking.
I really thought fishing was just casting out and if you caught something you just looked up what it is and that's it. I still have no clue how to physically attach anything to my line. Sure I know the fishermans knot but things like spinners and and swivels look really weird and I can't figure them out. When I ask how long the line should be between the bobber and hook. An estimated length would be nice so I could at least get some kind of idea. Is a foot to much? seems like a lot of dangling line at the end of my rod that I might catch on something. Is that normal?

This is what I managed to figure out from the book. I'll mainly be fishing in sections 3 and 4 (no clue what that means but at least I know something) section 4 will be in a river that has a lake at the mouth. Section 3 will be anywhere in Dartmouth/Eastern Passage so I'm assuming lakes.

How can I tell if it's a private constructed pond. If I can't find the name of place I want to fish on the list in the book does that mean I'm not allowed to fish there?

Is the swivel supposed to be near the hook or near the bobber?

Is there an average hook size that's good for the average fish I'd be catching around here?

Is there an average bait that most fish will be attracted to?

I really don't like the idea of having to study up on each and every specific place I'm going to be fishing. I'm extremely stressed out over this. I don't want to get in any trouble.

pretty much what I'm asking is, Is there just an average set up that I don't have to muck around with?

also, I really appreciate the help but saying things like "The swivel attaches to the lure" completely confuses me. What's a lure? what's it for? do you have to use one? how does it attach?

The above statement isn't anyone in particular it's just how I noticed most people are answering me.

each time I open this stupid confusing book I'm having panic attacks.

"You really don't want to go fishing at all. All you seem to want is an excuse to justify going off by yourself, finding a beautiful spot by a watercourse, sitting down, and doing absolutely nothing."

Actually I do, I want to have an activity to share with my dad. But I really honestly thought it was easier than all this. I'm so worried about getting in trouble and doing something wrong that it's flipping me out. When I went to the (I think it's called U-Fish?) I had a good time. It took me a little while to learn how to wheel in the fish, but once I figured that out and caught my first fish I liked it. But there all I had to do was cast out and make sure I didn't catch more than 5 fish. Super easy.

I'm just really really confused by all the rules.

The easiest way I can put it is. Pretend I'm a 5 year old who's never even heard of the concept of fishing. I really do need to learn literally everything. I learned the names of the things in my tackle my reading the sticker on the side and looking up pictures on google.
 

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IF you really want an activity to share with your dad, ask him to help you out. I am assuming that your dad is an angler. If not, ask him first if he wants to be one before you decide that this is going to be your "shared" activity. As I said, "Fishing For Dummies" is a decent read. It is a very easy way to absorb knowledge. It is more about the "journey" than the "getting there". Regards....
 

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IF you really want an activity to share with your dad, ask him to help you out. I am assuming that your dad is an angler. If not, ask him first if he wants to be one before you decide that this is going to be your "shared" activity. As I said, "Fishing For Dummies" is a decent read. It is a very easy way to absorb knowledge. It is more about the "journey" than the "getting there". Regards....
May dad used to be quite the "angler" (that's the term is it?) when I was little. Recently I came across his old fishing stuff and he's actually kept it up the last few years even though he hasn't fished. I showed him the stuff I just bought and he ended up telling me a whole bunch of old fishing stories. And everyone who knows us has been saying to ask for his advice but I don't want to look like a complete moron in front of him. Or are the questions I'm asking normal questions for someone who's never fished?
 

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Hiking is a good way of getting off by yourself. There are books called hiking trails of Nova Scotia, and waterfalls of Nova Scotia to give you some interesting spots to go hiking.

Give us some general location as to where you live a city name and we will be able to suggest a spot and what you might need to take. Or the name of the first lake, or river you would like to fish on.

just noticed you mentioned eastern passage and dartmouth in your above post
 

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I assume that you and your dad must have gone your separate ways as you grew up. Communication is the key!! Your father, I'm sure would never think of his son as a "complete moron" especially if you asked for help and advice!! As a father of two "grown up" and 2 "growing up" sons, nothing pleases me more than my sons coming to me for help and advice. I am sure your dad is a very knowledgeable angler who would be very happy to share his knowledge with his son. I suspect that, at some time, he was saddened by not having you as a fishing "side kick" in your younger years. The very fact that he shared what he did when you approached him is a very good sign. If you tell him that you know nothing about the subject but are very willing and able to learn (especially from him) I'm sure he will reciprocate. The fact he didn't have you to take fishing (for whatever reason) may be the reason he has given it up. Don't let your ego get in the way of you and he getting together. Be the 5 year old,and enjoy it!! It sounds like you have a lot of catching up to do. Enjoy your time with him - We are not here for a long time.... Regards......
 

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I'm gonna try post a pic of the simplest setup for you. If this doesn't work I'll try send it by personal message.

Attach this setup to your line with one or two lead weights (add more as you fish if your hook doesn't sink well, which might be the case if the current is a little fast). Dig up some worms and stick one on the hook. Find a small stream. Ie: drive down some back roads out of town through the woods till you cross something little and secluded looking. Walk along the stream casting this into calm pools. Bring a pair of needle-nose pliers to help removing the hook from the fish.

You keep mentioning you want the relaxing side of fishing. Walking down a forest stream casting in is a great way to do this.



Dave

and again, let us know your area, I'm certain that most guys on this site would be willing to take ya out and show you how to start off, me being one of em.
 

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and if you got any other questions feel free to send me a personal message and I'll try explain what you need. Oh, and by the way most streams you'll find are free for the fishing, its mostly the bigger rivers that have all the rules.
 

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hmm, my pic failed. Let's try this one:



Here's a swivel. Tie this on to the line, then attach the spinner to it, attach a hook to spinner etc.:

 

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hmm, my pic failed. Let's try this one:



Here's a swivel. Tie this on to the line, then attach the spinner to it, attach a hook to spinner etc.:

You have NO IDEA how much that first pic helped me. So you attach the eye of the hook right to the spinner? that's seems pretty easy.


So I tie a line to the eye part of the swivel and attach the eye of thehook to the clip part? wow, it seems so obvious now. lol

here's what my spinners look like. I had to draw a pic because I couldn't find one.


So I'm assuming that the line is tied on to the eye hole at the 90[sup]o[/sup] bend then attach the eye of the hook to the clip?

thanks. Also, where I'll be dropping my first line next weekend is a river in Queens County that has a current strong enough to knock me off my feet. I'm guessing I'll have to find a place with more still water right?
 

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Oldschool, the best way to learn all of this is to hook up with an experienced angler for a day or two on the water. I'm sure there are some folks on the site who would be happy to show you the ropes.

Few things are really as complicated as they seem once you actually start doing them.
 

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glad that helped.

The spinner you drew is a different type of spinner. It is very commonly used for bass in lakes, but if it is a small enough one then it's good for trout too I suppose, never personally tried that one on trout. Give er a try though! The type of spinner I posted can be bought at C Tire or Walmart for dirt cheap if ya want one.

The one you drew, just attach a hook to the clip part. You can even get a jig head hook:


This will help add some weight, then you don't need sinkers on the line. Don't go too big though for a stream or it will drag on the bottom. Put the jig on hook upwards (helps prevent snags):



Actually that pic shows it perfectly! Big tip: when using a 90 degree spinner like that, TIE THE LINE to the spinner itself, right in the hole you mentioned. DON'T use a swivel. If you're using a spinner like I showed first, the straight one, a swivel is nice because you can easily change to a different spinner if you think they don't like the one on.

I would try find a little bit calmer water than the current that can knock you over. Look for spots behind boulders, under washed out stumps, along logs etc.
 

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I didn't fully read everyones advice, I'm sure that what these guys have told you will catch you a lot of fish, if it hasn't already,

But I can make another suggestion and that is to check out www.youtube.com for fishing tips. I've been fishing for 20 years and still learn something new on there all the time... type in whatever species you're fishing for and it should list a whole bunch of different videos, often with specific details for catching each one....

good luck and I hope you can hook into a big one!!

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=smallmouth+bass+fishing+tips&aq=2

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=brook+trout+fishing+tips&aq=3

Hope this helps, don't be discouraged. Fishing is one of the most amazing things you can do outdoors (not that there is anything wrong with just going for a hike) but fishing really is not that hard. Give these sites (and others) a shot and see if you can't land a few, I'm sure if you start catching fish you'll get hooked. pardon the pun

cheers
 
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