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Hi all,

I'm a beginner, interested in lake shore fishing. All I have at the moment are sneakers, so I am interested in purchasing the appropriate footwear. I'm trying to decide between a good ole pair of rubber boots or some chest waders. Are chest waders overkill? Thanks.

Matt
 

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Since I bought a pair two years ago there is rarely a time I don't use mine. There's comfort in knowing you won't have to worry about stepping out a few extra feet to get a cast out further or get to some of the harder to access areas where others may not fish heavily (in theory fished less?). Right now there is a pair on sale at Canadian tire $100 off that someone mentioned on another thread (Perry maybe?) for $99 and they are breathable (key). Good luck, the only issue i have with mine is drying them which seems to take forever! (neoprene)

Cheers
 

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I have both, and I do a lot of river and lake fishing and I get a lot more use out of my chest waders. You can access more areas and don't have to worry about getting water in your boots. Ct had a pair of breathable chest waders on sale for $100, don't know if they are still on sale.
 

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Ah looks like blandingo got it in before I did.
 

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i wouldn't be without waders but don't do like i did my first pair were 3 mil neoprene and they were great in the spring in cold water but hot in the summer weeks since ive bought breathable waders much better in july
 

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Although I'm fortunate to have a boat, there are waters I fish from shore, and to be able to wade out and cast parallel to the shoreline really increases success, I've been using hip waders, and this weekend picked up a pair of the chest waders mentioned above, can't wait to get them wet
 

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Although I'm fortunate to have a boat, there are waters I fish from shore, and to be able to wade out and cast parallel to the shoreline really increases success, I've been using hip waders, and this weekend picked up a pair of the chest waders mentioned above, can't wait to get them wet
The advice about casting parallel to shore while wading is excellent. I floated around Powder Mill for a few hours this afternoon on a pontoon boat and caught three dozen SMB. In almost every case, I was casting within a foot or two of the shoreline and the fish struck within six feet of the shore. Had I been shore fishing (and not wading), I'm sure I would have been casting over the fish and/or spooking them.

This brings me to another point. I had bare feet in swim fins for the entire afternoon and I wasn't uncomfortable. Lake temperatures are high enough right now that wet wading is a cheap and simple alternative. Throw on some swim trunks and have at 'er...

Paul
 

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Chest waders are great to have but make sure you get a wading belt
Before you put your wading belt on wade in the water and let the water collapse the wader against your legs forcing the air up and out of your wader then fasten your belt
If you get air trapped in your waders it will be harder to wade and if you fall in your legs float up forcing your upper body down
The simms wading videos are posted on here and are worth the time to watch
good luck
 

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Waders are a great way to go. Breathable are the only way to go. Neoprene or rubber get way to hot. I would suggest getting a pair of stocking foot waders and purchase a good pair of wading boots to with it. They are way more comfortable and are easier to walk in. Espically more traction and stability when wading in current on rivers. Muddy bottoms are easier with wafing boots as well. If youve ever lost a rubber boot in deep mud imagine when the boot goes all the way to your chest. You also get better ankle support and after a long day of walking allot less chaffing,tired feet and a soar back.

I would stay away from waders with the feet attached for all the rearsons mentioned above. If your on a tight budget spend the majority of the cash on the wading boots. Your feet and back will thank you. If you take care of them and allow them to dry after each use they will lst a long time. A little leather dubbing will go a long way.

If you can afford it go with a higher end wader with articulated knees and double layered knees and rear end. They are more comportable and will last a lot longer.
 

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Like other's have said don't go neoprene,i bought the xplore on sale at crappy tire and they are WAY WAY to hot for anything but spring fishing,also they are to heavy for me to wade very long in.Might use them for fall salmon fishing but I doubt it.
 

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I picked up these Redington Palix River waders last year in an online sale from another site, but I know you can get them at Fishing Fever or Hnatiuks:

http://www.redington.com/fly-fishing-waders/waders/mens/palix-river/

They are a lot more comfortable than heavy Can Tire stuff. It's sort of like a nice raincoat material but tough enough you don't have to worry about ripping them. I even had a muddler minnow fly tag me in the back of the leg and the material did not pierce.

I also picked up these boots at Hnatiuk's in Lantz.

http://www.redington.com/fly-fishing-waders/footwear/mens/skagit-wading-boot-rubber/

Again, much nicer than the questionable tread on the soles of Can Tire stuff. Like wearing comfortable hiking boots.

Together, they'll cost you around $250 (Around $149 for the waders & roughly $100 for the boots, unless you spot a sale somewhere). They're not the cheapest stuff but not breaking the bank on Simms or Orvis label gear.

I had another thread started asking if I needed to get cleats put in the treads of the boots but the general feedback from the other guys on this site was that it's not necessary in N.S.

Also, Terran posted a great thread on wading safety that included video links and tips.
 

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On the topic of waders, how do you dry yours? I have some Xplore neoprene waders (love them) but I find the inside stays wet even if hang them for over a week. I've seen wader drying racks online, are they really worth the $$? Any other ideas or tips? Nothing worse than putting on damp waders on a day like today! Thanks.
 

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Turn them inside out and put some newspaper in the boots for an hour, remove, and put them in front of a fan blowing in the boots. Waders are never completely dry anyway as your sweat builds up inside especially if you fish like i do, walking many miles a day in them.
 

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If you need to dry them in a hurry a vacume works well. This only works if your vacume has an exaust hose attachment. Shop vacs are perfect. Just insert the hose all the way into the foot and attach the hose to the exhaust side and let her go. The fast moving air usually has them dry in no time. Other then that turning them inside out and use a fan is best way if you cant hang them outdoors.
 
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