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There is not doubt in my mind that the oil spill will have a detrimental affect on the Bluefin Tuna spawning in the gulf.


Now, that being said......................only time will tell the true affects this spill will have on the fishery.
 

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Just came across this and thought I would share this with you guys and gals.

Blue Fin to be wiped out?
What a shame, and for such a major disaster that could have easily been avoided. Anyway, no sense ranting about that, just gets the blood boiling to much. Wonder if this is going to happen if they start the proposed drilling in the Gulf St. Lawrence, a spill there and were all in trouble with tourism, fisheries, and livelihood straight up to the great lakes.

has anyone fished Blue fin tuna off Nova Scotia, when do they make the run up here? Would be a good time to get out and try and get one of them. Looks like fun.
 

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has anyone fished Blue fin tuna off Nova Scotia, when do they make the run up here? Would be a good time to get out and try and get one of them. Looks like fun.
Catching big Bluefin Tuna is FUN!!!! But, unfortunately, there is NO way to "LEGALY" target Bluefin Tuna recreationaly in Nova Scotia!!!!!


The fishery is only open to the commercial exploitation of the species!!!!!
 

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The fishery is only open to the commercial exploitation of the speciesThat doesn't even make sence,....lol,...but we knew that didn't we.

Trav
 

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Xlobstermen, Is it not true that some commercial fisherman in NS provide an oppurtunity for a recreational fisherman to join them on there boats ? I always thought they did.
 

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Xlobstermen, Is it not true that some commercial fisherman in NS provide an oppurtunity for a recreational fisherman to join them on there boats ? I always thought they did.
I am sure there are the rare few that will take some close friends fishing with them, but for the the most part, there are very few, if any, that run sportfishing charters in NS. The reason being is they don't want a few inexperienced fisherman that charter the boat for a few hundred $$ a day to take a chance on loosing a fish that is worth THOSANDS of $$$$$ to the owner of the boat. The commercial tuna fisherman are very good at what they do, and I am quite positive that they don't loose too many fish once they are hooked!!!

What once started as, and at one time was a thriving Tuna Charter Business, has evolved into a commercial only fishery! And the reason is because of the high demand, and the high dollar these fish have on their heads in the Japanese Sushi industry. It is simple economics...................if you have a demand for a product, and/or comodity, you will always have someone who will supply the demand for that market, either legally, or illegally!!!!

Anyhow, here is the text from another website that tells of the history of the once thriving sportfishery for Tuna in Nova Scotia;

In its heyday, sport tuna angling brought teams from all over the world to this small Acadian community. It attracted rich and famous visitors including President Franklin Roosevelt, Kate Smith, Gene Tunney, Amelia Earhart, Ethel Dupont, Ernest Hemingway, Tony Hulman, Jean Béliveau and many others. The community and surrounding areas were bustling with excitement.

Michael Lerner is credited with bringing sports fishermen from around the world to Wedgeport. In 1935, he stayed here for 8 days and landed 21 tuna weighing in at 5,526 pounds.

After meeting Mr. Lerner, Captain Évée LeBlanc, who was an experienced tuna harpooner and had learned his fishing skills from his father, was convinced by Mr. Lerner that the giant bluefin could be caught on rod and reel. His boat towed the dory from which Michael Lerner caught his first tuna and was the first to install a tuna chair in his boat. Lerner also convinced the local captains that big game anglers would come to Wedgeport to catch tuna and that they must rig their lobster boats with fishing chairs.

In 1937, Wedgeport hosted its first International Tuna Cup Match when teams from around the globe converged on Wedgeport to compete for the Sharp Cup which was donated by Alton B. Sharp, a Boston businessman and an experienced fisherman. These fish could weigh-in at 800 (363 kg) pounds or more and the "reelin-in" could take hours. In 1949, 1780 Bluefin Tuna were landed. The Sharp Cup was. These competitions went on until the late 1970's. Since 1998 The Sharp cup has been presented in Halifax for the Nova Scotia Tuna Tournament which is held every year in September.

In the early 1950's Kip Farrinton, Jr. had an idea for an international fishing tournament for college students. Referred to as the Intercollegiate, the contest was held late August or early September in the waters off Wedgeport. Six Universities from the United States and six from Canada competed each year, with Mexico and Japan as invited guests from time to time. Edward Charles Migdalski, Director of Outdoor Recreation at Yale University, managed the intercollegiate Fish Game Seminar and Fishing Match from its conception in 1956 through to 1976 with the help of Alain Wood-Prince and Bob Crandall. Trophies associated with this competition are housed at the museum: the Tony Hulman Cup donated by Tony Hulman, owner of the Indianapolis Speedway, for the team which had the most pounds of fish; the Crandall Trophy donated by Julian Crandall of Ashaway Lines, for the student catching the most pounds of fish; and The R.J. Schaefer International Cup, donated by Rudy Schaefer of F & M Brewing for the country with the most total points.

In the 1940's and 1950s all of Nova Scotia's tourism budget was spent on the International Tuna Match. With the enormous number of people coming to the event, many hotels, motels, inns, and restaurants had to be built. This was an exciting time for this area.

In 2004 the museum re-introduced the Tuna Tournament to the area with the help of the Yarmouth Shark Scramble. The tournament was held in Yarmouth for three years. However, in 2007, the the fourth year, the Wedgeport Tuna Tournament was held in Wedgeport for the first time since 1976. Once again the spectators watched in wide-eyed excitement as nine large tuna were hoisted off the boats that participated in the tournament. The fundraising event was a huge success. The 5th annual event was held in late August, 2008


http://tuna.mindseed.../tournament.htm
 

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When I returned from living overseas I really wanted to fish for tuna, be it charter or private boat. None to be found. Needless to say I was very disappointed. My background is in economics but it doesn't take a trained economist to see the potential tourist and local dollars that would be generated by opening up this sport fishery. Create a licensing system, regulate it and let the people fish! What' sad is that I'll be travelling over half-way around the world and will be able to fish for Bigeye & Yellowfin tuna without a care in the world. I'll be sure to post the photos.

PS: I suppose that is why I can't find any decent saltwater gear in Nova Scotia. I checked a few local retailers yesterday and couldn't even find saltwater hooks! I guess I'll have to keep sending my money south of the border. Sad...
 

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When I returned from living overseas I really wanted to fish for tuna, be it charter or private boat. None to be found. Needless to say I was very disappointed. My background is in economics but it doesn't take a trained economist to see the potential tourist and local dollars that would be generated by opening up this sport fishery. Create a licensing system, regulate it and let the people fish! What' sad is that I'll be travelling over half-way around the world and will be able to fish for Bigeye & Yellowfin tuna without a care in the world. I'll be sure to post the photos.

PS: I suppose that is why I can't find any decent saltwater gear in Nova Scotia. I checked a few local retailers yesterday and couldn't even find saltwater hooks! I guess I'll have to keep sending my money south of the border. Sad...
Yeah, sad, really. Considering that there are just millions of bluefin out there, all hoping against hope that some fly-by-nite tourist, or a 'commercial fisherman', will come sailing by and put them out of their misery before some 'commercial fisherman' nets them off Africa, or they drown in the sludge of the Gulf oil spill. Think of all the money to be made before they all go extinct!! Literally a corporate accountant's wet dream!!

Rots a Ruck in Africa.

chuck
 

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Yeah, sad, really. Considering that there are just millions of bluefin out there, all hoping against hope that some fly-by-nite tourist, or a 'commercial fisherman', will come sailing by and put them out of their misery before some 'commercial fisherman' nets them off Africa, or they drown in the sludge of the Gulf oil spill. Think of all the money to be made before they all go extinct!! Literally a corporate accountant's wet dream!!

Rots a Ruck in Africa.

chuck
Interesting sarcasm. I think you totally missed the point. You'd be hard pressed to find anyone on this forum who has the mentality you seem to be implying in your post. The reality is that a properly managed tuna sportfishery would be a welcome addition to this so-called "have-not" province. Why does one have to go to another province or to the US to do this when we have it in our own backyard? Would there be spin-offs? Of course! That's business and it makes sense. I'm sure the restaurants, hotels, retail shops and other provincial attractions that would benefit wouldn't complain... I don't recall the businesses in the downtown Halifax core complaining that the patrons of the Nova Scotia Tatoo were spending their cash in their establishments. I can't see current shops like Fishing Fever complaining when they receive an increase in business; that is, if they decide to carry the tackle.

Also, if you're referring to me being a "fly-by-nite tourist" by fishing overseas then you're sadly mistaken and uninformed. You have no idea of my connection to the place I'm moving to. Absolutely none! By the way, I'll be fishing in one specific country, not the entire continent. "Africa" is NOT a country. At least get your facts straight before you initiate a rant. BTW, the few charters that are in the country are licensed and legitimate operations. Just as legitimate as the shark charter that sponsors this forum.
 

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Yeah, sad, really. Considering that there are just millions of bluefin out there, all hoping against hope that some fly-by-nite tourist, or a 'commercial fisherman', will come sailing by and put them out of their misery before some 'commercial fisherman' nets them off Africa, or they drown in the sludge of the Gulf oil spill. Think of all the money to be made before they all go extinct!! Literally a corporate accountant's wet dream!!

Rots a Ruck in Africa.

chuck
Well Mr. Fluffy,
I am not sure I understand your sarcasm?


Can you please elaborate in a more concise manner? Are you against all types of fishing, or just big game offshore fishing in general?


X
 

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JHG; Did u check at Fishing Fever and Hi Liner?? I know that both have Salt Water tackle. Regards.....
 

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JHG; Did u check at Fishing Fever and Hi Liner?? I know that both have Salt Water tackle. Regards.....
Well Ian,
not to side track the original subject of this message thread, but I am not impressed by the Hi Liner Tackle store!!

A few years ago when I moved back to NS, I was hard pressed to find a tackle store that carried saltwater fishing tackle. Then I found Hi Liner's website. I browsed the pages and saw they carried some of the tackle I would be looking for in the future. I also had them send me their catalog on CD. I received the CD, and made a shopping list of stuff I needed to go fishing in the new boat I purchased. So one day, I made the 2 hour drive to Halifax to do my shopping at Hi Liner. Well, I got to the store, and was not too impressed with the small displays, and I could not find anything on the store shelf that I was looking for! So I asked the person behind the counter for the stuff on the list I had, and they had almost NOTHING in stock but a few of the items on my list, but they stated they could order it for me!!!!

Anyhow, I left the store with a hand full of items, out of a full list of stuff I wanted, and I have not been back!!!!!!

I now do 99% of my tackle shopping online, I get much better deals by doing it that way, and I do not have to make a 4 hour round trip to get the stuff I want.

Would I recomend Hi Liner to any of my friends.........................well yes, if you need a plastic squid, in a wide variety of colors, then Hi Liner is the place to go, they have a wall full of them!!! If you need anything else, well............................................good luck?
 

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X,
I'm sorry that you feel that way. I buy what I need locally - if they have it. If not, I will, if need be, source product internationally. I am fortunate in that I don't have to make a 4 hour pilgrimage just to visit stores which carry a limited selection of goods, most of which I don't like, or I don't need, or will not purchase because I can buy them online for less money. You could also check with IMP. They too, stock products for commercial fishermen. Obviously you have been spoiled by easy access to saltwater tackle/gear when u lived in California. I'm surprised that you didn't return with lots of exotic gear which is not available to those of us who live in the Great White North. On another note, there are NO sportfishing charter boats in Nova Scotia who are licensed by Dept of Transport to carry paying passengers to catch Bluefin Tuna. Regards......
 

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Chuck Fluff;
I can see why the Bluefin are still being fished. Despite the attempts of the North Americans to have severe restrictions placed on the fishery, they have failed because of the economic pressure and votes held by the Europeans!!! (They got voted down) All this despite the fact that as of 2000, the BFT population has shrunk by 97% to just 3% of their pre-longline population. The thinking is that, if the Europeans are going to make them extinct anyway, why should I stop fishing??? I'm not going to stop fishing because if I do I will be rewarding the Europeans for their greed. Our fishers and the Americans are still abiding by their quotas. We know that other nations' fleets are not so well regulated. The Americans are in the process of trying to pass legislation which will protect the BFT spawning area in the north western Caribbean which is also being impacted by the oil spill in the Gulf. It is a sad story which is being driven by the demand of the Japanese/ Asians for their sushi and sashimi. All the while, Japan bills itself as eco-friendly, green nation and a planet loving country, as they fund the rush to extinction of BFT, Sharks (Their fins in soup make your wewe woody) etc etc, sadly, the list goes on, and on, and on........ Regards......
 

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Chuck Fluff;
I can see why the Bluefin are still being fished. Despite the attempts of the North Americans to have severe restrictions placed on the fishery, they have failed because of the economic pressure and votes held by the Europeans!!! (They got voted down) All this despite the fact that as of 2000, the BFT population has shrunk by 97% to just 3% of their pre-longline population. The thinking is that, if the Europeans are going to make them extinct anyway, why should I stop fishing??? I'm not going to stop fishing because if I do I will be rewarding the Europeans for their greed. Our fishers and the Americans are still abiding by their quotas. We know that other nations' fleets are not so well regulated. The Americans are in the process of trying to pass legislation which will protect the BFT spawning area in the north western Caribbean which is also being impacted by the oil spill in the Gulf. It is a sad story which is being driven by the demand of the Japanese/ Asians for their sushi and sashimi. All the while, Japan bills itself as eco-friendly, green nation and a planet loving country, as they fund the rush to extinction of BFT, Sharks(Their fins in soup make your we-we woody) etc etc, sadly, the list goes on. Regards......
Hi Shimanoman;

With respect, you may have gotten this one backwards. See--

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8574775.stm

The fact is, it was the corporatist Canadian gov't. that helped axe European conservation initiatives wrt the bluefin breedinf off North Africa. A few years back the same corporatist Canadian gov't. [altho' it was probably the Liberal version of corporatism that time] helped axe a UN initiative to outlaw trawling, drifting long-lines, etc., having learned absolutely nothing from the cod crash.

To put the marine situation in perspective, anyone unaware of the disastrous state of large pelagic species [salmon, swordfish, sharks, tuna, just name a few] should see--

http://www.bigmarinefish.com/bluefin.html

Getting back to the bluefin conservation effort, see--

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8560896.stm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8574775.stm

The USA and the EU supported the ban, but Canada, Japan [of course!!] and most others voted against it. Too much easy money still left to be made in the few years left before they go extinct.

BTW, one of the US corporatist media outlets recently did a bit on the threat to world's only other bluefin breeding ground, [the Gulf of Mexico], by the BP oil spill. Surprised me, that. Corporatist media is really not into conservation.

And let's not forget the sharks, swordfish, and salmon, along with just about every other species of marine life out there. I mean, even the the phyto-plancton that generate most of the oxygen we breathe are now in serious decline. Apparently the oceans are turning acidic. Oh, well, what the hell, who am I to stop people from having a good time?

cheers,

chuck
 

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Obviously you have been spoiled by easy access to saltwater tackle/gear when u lived in California. I'm surprised that you didn't return with lots of exotic gear which is not available to those of us who live in the Great White North.
Well Ian,
you are 100% correct............................I am, or was spoiled from living out West, and having lots of very good tackle stores availabe to me!!! I was also spoiled by having a wide variety of offshore recreational angling opportunities available to me also!!! It realy saddens me when I ponder the lack of recreational saltwater sportfishing we have here in NS, and it is not due to the lack of the resources, it is from the politics of our GOV, and commercial greed....................................$$$$$$$$


Anyhow, I did bring lots of tackle with me, but I have a very limited use for most of it because of the restrictions in place for recreational offshore angling!
 

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The fact is, it was the corporatist Canadian gov't. that helped axe European conservation initiatives wrt the bluefin breedinf off North Africa. A few years back the same corporatist Canadian gov't. [altho' it was probably the Liberal version of corporatism that time] helped axe a UN initiative to outlaw trawling, drifting long-lines, etc., having learned absolutely nothing from the cod crash.
Well Fluffy,
you did hit the nail on the head with that statement!!!

Now, in the US they have just recently put a ban on keeping the larger trophy BFT for recreational fishing, but they still recognize the need for a limited recreational take on BFT, so you can still keep some smaller school sized fish.

https://hmspermits.noaa.gov/News.asp

If the Canadian Gov. would pull their heads out of their @sses, they could model our BFT fishery like they do in the US, after all, it is the same resource, then we could all have access to the fishery!!!
 

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And let's not forget the sharks, swordfish, and salmon, along with just about every other species of marine life out there. I mean, even the the phyto-plancton that generate most of the oxygen we breathe are now in serious decline. Apparently the oceans are turning acidic. Oh, well, what the hell, who am I to stop people from having a good time?
And one more thing Fluffy,
if you think alowing a limited, well regulated recreational shark, and/or tuna fishery here in NS is going to have a large inpact on the resource, then you need to check out this video of an average DAY in a Japaneese fish market;


http://www.youtube.c...h?v=oHVrF2nL_iQ
 
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