How Discriminating Are Fish To Swivels, Weights And Other Line Items? - Lures & Lure Making - Nova Scotia Fishing

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How Discriminating Are Fish To Swivels, Weights And Other Line Items?


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#1 OleNewfieDog

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 09:09 PM

Just wondering how discriminating are fish to seeing stuff on the line near the hook. I see some set ups have weight and spinners on the leader, close to the hook. Other set ups have all the 'stuff' on the main line, and the leader is bascially just line and hook.

 

Does anyone have any 'facts' on species of fish, and how they discriminate (or not) based on extra stuff close to the hook. Is there a general rule of thumb that there should be a minimal amount of space between hook and 'other stuff'.


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Personal hook & line records:
Chain Pickerel - 24" 4lbs
Small Mouth Bass - 19.25" and 2lbs 1oz
Trout - 10"
Yellow Perch - 8"
Brown Bullhead - 10"
Shark - 120" Blue (dad's line actually :P )
Atlantic Cod - 36" (25 to 30 lbs approx)
Mackerel - tinkers
Scoulpin - who cares :angry:

#2 NS_Sens

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 09:36 PM

I don't have any "facts" but I remember once my father in law made fun of me when we were fishing a small brook for trout and I was throwing a spinner with added weight.  He was telling me I was scaring the fish with all the noise.  Since then I usually just use the bare minimum and have fairly good success.  I go fishing with a buddy for bass and he throws all kinds of stuff on his line, spinners and weights before adding plastics, I just go hook and plastic and always out fish him.

 

Obviously there are times when added gear is necessary, but I try to stay away from it.


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#3 902

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 12:56 PM

Personally I've caught tons of bass with a giant weight tied less than 6 inches below the hook (I usually put more space, but it works regardless). As long as the fish (bass) you are trying to catch aren't right at the surface, the splash isn't too big of a deal in my experience.

 

I've also attached my hook directly to the swivel, and surprisingly had no problem catching smallies. I figured they'd completely ignore it given how bulky and obvious it appears, but it worked just fine. 


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#4 -----

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 01:40 PM

I do not use swivels ever. I use leaders only when salt water fishing. Trout fishing I tie directly to my main line the Spinner I am using. My results are positive, at least for me, that it works.


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#5 scuro

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 12:33 AM

Swivels for things that spin like a spinner and a spoon. Trout, specs, and Bonefish spook oh so easily. Literally look at them wrong at that might be enough.


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#6 jsawler

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 09:02 AM

I always have a swivel attached to my line about 1 foot up my line when fishing a spinner. i'll often fish a snap on a crankbait as well. I have had the snaps let go tho. but it doesn't happen very often!and it's never straightened out; just un-done.


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#7 Lunker

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 11:48 AM

Swivels - Personally i do not use them often. If i do i usually will tie up approx a foot or two depending on lure/spinner

 

weights- bottom fishing for trout  - a foot minimum

                                           bass - 1-2 feet

 

Also , when fly fishing i use a furled leader, and tie on a minimum of 4 feet of tippet. When i get trimmed down to 3 feet i retie . Depending on what species i'm fly fishing for i run 3-7 feet of tippet behind furled leaders. 

 

Sorry no "Facts" for you, but i consider myself very successful 


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#8 OleNewfieDog

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 03:02 PM

Sorry no "Facts" for you, but i consider myself very successful 

 

Anf just who is it that decides what is fact or not?  :D


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Personal hook & line records:
Chain Pickerel - 24" 4lbs
Small Mouth Bass - 19.25" and 2lbs 1oz
Trout - 10"
Yellow Perch - 8"
Brown Bullhead - 10"
Shark - 120" Blue (dad's line actually :P )
Atlantic Cod - 36" (25 to 30 lbs approx)
Mackerel - tinkers
Scoulpin - who cares :angry:

#9 pmorris

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 06:00 PM

Anf just who is it that decides what is fact or not?  :D

 

Dave Mercer  :D


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#10 Terran

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 10:42 PM

OleNDog,

 

You apparently have asked a difficult and somewhat "personal" question. The use of "Terminal Tackle" (See terminal tackle/wikipedia:http://en.wikipedia..../Fishing_tackle ) is not a cut and dry answer.

 

You see, it all depends on how a person learned to fish. Some were taught with and some without.

 

So, I guess we'll look at the "Facts", as I see them.

 

Not all situations are equal and not all fish are equal either. The use of terminal tackle depends on the species, conditions and "how educated the fish are".

 

Species: For freshwater fishing certain species can be far more "aware" of terminal tackle. Trout for instance can be very fussy when it comes to terminal tackle. Brown Trout are very discriminating. Speckles can be somewhat fussy. Rainbows can be at times discriminating and at others they'd bust on a Buick.

 

Smallmouth can be fussy, but it all depends on the situation. Certainly, rigs like the Carolina or Texas Rig don't seem to phase the fish too much. Yet other times you are forced to present a whacky rigged worm with little in the way of terminal tackle.

 

Chain Pickerel...they're just feeding machines and I have never considered them a discriminating fish. I've seen a Pickerel hit a white perch with a big spinner hanging out it's mouth. Not so discriminating.

 

Other species of freshwater fish are usually not terminal tackle shy, in my experience.

 

Conditions: First, let's start with water clarity. Most of your terminal tackle is a visibility issue. So the effect it has on your fishing will depend on how clear the water is where you are fishing. Muddy or stained the fish aren't going to notice as much as if you are fishing gin clear water. Thankfully (or not) you won't run into many gin clear conditions here.

 

The second condition I'd consider is the sky. Is it sunny, cloudy, windy? Depending on the species, the reflective "flash" or silhouette of the terminal tackle on your line may make a difference. Again depending on the species targetted. So you might want to consider the colour of your weight or swivel in these situations.

 

The last condition I would consider is that of the fish. Are they actively feeding? Are they finicky?

 

The last factor, "How educated are they", is very important too. Fish aren't as dumb as some would like to think. The more pressure an area gets, the more educated the fish will get. Places that don't see a lot of pressure from other anglers will produce far less discriminating fish. Easy access and strongly pressured areas will produce fish that will be more discriminating and less quick to the hook.

 

It's these educated fish that need to be addressed with a little more thought. Sometimes it just takes throwing something they haven't seen before. Other times it will take some finessing.

 

 

Basically, all fish and all fishing conditions are not equal. The more you know about your quarry, the better the decisions you will make when setting up your tackle.

 

Personally, when I use a swivel it's usually the smallest I can get away with depending on the weight of the fish I'm expecting to catch. For most situations you can get away with a #12 swivel. I prefer black for the colour.

 

I like to use foam or rubber core weights over split shot when possible. Less chance of damaging the line and they are adjustable.

 

So that's my take on an answer to your question. Guaranteed others may feel differently, depending on their own experiences.

 

Take from it what you think is logical.

 

Cheers,

 

Terran


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#11 OleNewfieDog

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 10:38 AM

Wow, right on thanks Terran. Boy oh boys, if that aint 'fact' then nothing is.  :)


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Personal hook & line records:
Chain Pickerel - 24" 4lbs
Small Mouth Bass - 19.25" and 2lbs 1oz
Trout - 10"
Yellow Perch - 8"
Brown Bullhead - 10"
Shark - 120" Blue (dad's line actually :P )
Atlantic Cod - 36" (25 to 30 lbs approx)
Mackerel - tinkers
Scoulpin - who cares :angry:

#12 Al_ G _62

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 01:04 PM

Well I was always told minimal items near the hook, but since I started fishing stripers that theory has been blown away.

 

 My standard striper rig is 24" of 300 lb mono, two brass sliders, two 12" pieces of 300 lb mono, assorted crimps and swivels, 8 oz of lead, two 9/0# circle hooks' threaded through a few oz of squid,  Makes quite a splash at 80-100 yards out.  This year alone my wife and I have landed 8 keepers, up to 15lbs, numerous schoolies. My fishing buddies, all using the same ugly tangles have accounted for another 25+ keepers and hundreds of schoolies.

 

I don't know about other species, but as far as I am concerned as long as there is a chunk of food attached and the stripers are there, it is going to get hit.

 

I have a friend who likes to experiment, he says ( and I believe him ) that he has caught striper on irish spring soap, chocolate bars, bait splashed with old spice aftershave,etc.  I read that if truffles grew in the ocean that stripers would find them, swimming along with their snouts in the mud.

 

I have to agree with terran, in the bay of fundy and attached estuaries, visibility isn't an issue, in fact when I was fishing the Shubie this spring schools of gaspereau kept running into the  bank, lol

 

I have had success ( no keepers ) with stripers in the surf on top water rattle baits, I guess when they can't see the bait they will follow the noise of their prey.

 

This weekend I plan to try a rattle on my cut bait rig, near the hook.

 

They say that it takes 50 hours of fishing to take one keeper, I might as well have fun trying new gadgets while I am putting in the time, lol

 

I heard a story of a striper fisherman in five islands last week who got yanked off his seat and dragged accross the beach and into the water before he let go of his rod.  He retrieved the rod later ( probably when the tide went out ) still had the hook, but it was straightened out.  Probably shark or seal.

 

Keep your line in the water


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#13 Lunker

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 09:45 PM

I was taught something while hunting that i transfer to fishing.

 

 

" The Biggest Deer are big for a reason - They are not stupid "

 

If i had a nickle for every time i've watched a nice trout follow my line in only to get so close and then take off, or to even come up at a fly and nose it around but not strike . Lets face it, if theres 10 fish in a pool, and 9 of them are small, and one is decent , chances are you are going to catch the 9 smaller ones before you get the big one, and after hauling x amount of fish out of a pool, chances are he won't take ! 

 

 

Lets face it, the bigger fish are the hardest to catch right ?! Or is it because they are 1000 small fish for every dandy ?! Hrmmmmmmm back to the drawing board ... .. 


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