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Clear Cutting Nova Scotia - The Bio-Massacre


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#41 basindawg

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 08:17 AM

We hugged and made up. Really though IceShanty is just upset because he bought an ATV that does not work so well. I explained to him that he should have bought an Arctic Cat, but no he would not listen to me. LOL

 

geeze now you're just pokin the hornets' nest, ya ol bugger :rolleyes:


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#42 IceShanty

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 08:17 AM

Sarcasm lowest form of wit LOL
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#43 IceShanty

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 08:19 AM

Nothing new here LOL
Same ---- different pile LOL
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#44 basindawg

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 08:19 AM

Sarcasm lowest form of wit LOL

 

yeah but it's quick and easy !


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#45 IceShanty

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 08:19 AM

Atvs and clear cuts still suck LOL
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#46 IceShanty

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 08:20 AM

Kind of like a atvs over a pair of hiking boots LOL
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#47 basindawg

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 08:23 AM

Everything is relative I guess. As long as we're able to have open discussion and dialog , even when it's heated, and still walk away with some degree of respect - we're doing well.


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#48 IceShanty

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 08:46 AM

Well said
I didn't single anyone person out.
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#49 basindawg

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 08:49 AM

Well said
I didn't single anyone person out.

 

Thanks, wanna argue discuss something else ? :rolleyes:


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#50 -----

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 09:17 AM

Well said
I didn't single anyone person out.

Nor did I single you out my friend. It was not at all sarcasm, it was intended simply as  humour. No tone in the post so it is hard to define how something is being relayed. Again it was not in any way sarcasm, just a little joke, related to the difference of two opinions. It was intended to be funny. Again as I said earlier, I respect your opinion, even if it differs from mine.

BTW, I own hiking boots too. Even though I ATV frequently, many of my fishing spots are still many KMs from any form of road/trail. I love hiking in the backwoods.


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I keep my head held high and smile, because there are people who will kill to see me fall.

#51 IceShanty

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 11:49 AM

Nope not at all
LOL
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#52 Terran

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 01:15 PM

I found a site and think that it speaks for itself. Here is a link to the sites Gallery. Take a look at our "Forestry Practices" and their results: Nova Scotia NDP Forest Policy / Photos - http://www.clearcutn...est-policy.html

 

Take some time and check out this site.

 

6175873_orig.jpg

Photo from: http://www.clearcutn...est-policy.html

 

Getting that sick feeling in the pit of my stomach...again.

 

Terran


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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#53 Terran

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 08:16 AM

The concept of Bio-Mass burning to generate power is probably one of the most disturbing ideas I've heard in a while. Not only is the fuel source our forests, but the pollution factor (green house gases) seems to be totally swept under the rug. So not only are they depleting the oxygen creating forests but also creating poor air quality in the process.

 

Here is an article that appeares in the Chronicle Herald.

 

NSP biomass site aims for 4% of power needs in N.S.

July 2, 2013 - 7:59pm BRUCE ERSKINE Business Reporter
 

Plant in operation after test

 

Nova Scotia Power’s $208-million biomass plant in Point Tupper is sparking up the utility’s grid.

 

The plant, which burns sustainably harvested bark, wood chips and sawdust, successfully completed a 120-hour test run last week and has been generating a steady supply of electricity ever since, said Mark Sidebottom, the utility’s vice-president of power generation and delivery.

 

“It’s an imporant milestone,” he said in an interview Tuesday.

 

Sidebottom said the 60-megawatt plant will supply three to four per cent of the province’s energy needs and nine to 12 per cent of renewable energy requirements by 2015.

 

The plant, which employs 30 people directly and another 200 in the forestry sector, is also supplying steam to Port Hawkesbury Paper, helping the mill reduce its costs, he said.

 

The biomass plant is expected to consume about 500,000 tonnes of sustainably harvested fuel annually.

 

Sidebottom said 80 per cent of that fuel will come from local suppliers.

 

Nova Scotia Power is in the process of choosing successful suppliers. Sidebottom said he was confident that the utility will be able to source sustainable biomass fuel.

 

“Absolutely,” he said, noting that suppliers will have to provide a “chain of custody” to prove that their fuel supplies are sustainable.

 

“We need to see that it has been sustainably harvested and meets all renewable standards.”

 

Nova Scotia foresters have expressed concerns recently about Port Hawkesbury Paper allegedly refusing to pay adequate prices for locally harvested wood.

 

Sidebottom said the utility is requesting prices from biomass suppliers.

 

“We choose the lowest cost for our customers,” he said, calling the process “healthy competition.”

 

Sidebottom said the biomass plant, which is wholly owned by Nova Scotia Power, is only three months behind its original schedule despite the bankruptcy of NewPage Port Hawkesbury Corp., which initiated the project to reduce its energy costs, and the 2011 Japanese tsunami, which threatened the delivery of the steam turbine.

 

He said the plant came online in time to meet the utility’s 2013 renewable energy targets.

 

Andrew Kekacs, program director with the Nova Scotia Woodlot Owners and Operators Association, said the group is concerned about the “significant” costs of transporting wood to the biomass plant.

 

“Trucking costs are high,” he said, while landowners can only expect to get between $2 and $4 a tonne for the low-grade wood the plant consumes.

 

“The return to the landowner is quite low,” Kekacs said. “The question of whether it is worth it is complicated.”

 

The association advocates smaller and more localized biomass heat and power generation in institutions such as hospitals and universities.

(http://thechronicleh...wer-needs-in-ns )

 

500,000 tonnes of sustainably harvested fuel annually? Yeah, that sounds sustainable over the long run.

 

A few of these things and we should be able to get rid of those pesky forests in no time. Not to mention the addition to our already wonderful air quality and acid rain.

 

Why not start incinerating garbage for power generation? Oh wait...that's probably next.

 

Terran


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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#54 Suprdave

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:48 PM

I have to laugh at the recurring phrase "sustainably harvested"...I've seen what these jokers  considers consider "sustainable" and sustainable it ain't.


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When the last tree is cut,
When the last fish is eaten,
When the last river poisoned,
You will realize,
You can't eat money.


#55 Terran

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 11:29 AM

N.S. bans tree harvesting methods

July 18, 2013 - 9:01pm MICHAEL GORMAN | TRURO BUREAU

 

Move pleases some in woodlot industry, but others worry about job losses

 

Nova Scotia will ban whole- and full-tree harvesting, a move drawing mixed reactions.

 

 

Whole-tree harvesting is the practice of removing all parts of a tree, including the stump and roots; full-tree harvesting leaves behind the stump and roots but takes everything else.

 

The ban does not apply to the Christmas tree industry or non-forestry sectors such as agriculture and development.

 

Natural Resources Minister Charlie Parker said the province committed to the ban after hearing from Nova Scotians.

 

“It’s a commitment within our natural resources strategy. It’s what Nova Scotians have been asking us to do,” he said.

 

“I think it’ll make for more sustainable forestry as we move forward.”

 

Parker said he thought only three or four companies use the whole-tree method and Nova Scotia would be the first province to ban the practice.

 

Andy Kekacs of the Nova Scotia Woodlot Owners and Operators Association said his organization supports the move. He said the group is concerned the intensity of harvesting over the last 50 years has led to declines in soil fertility.

 

“We believe that forest practices should mimic the natural disturbance regimes under which the Acadian forest evolved.”

 

But Robin Barrett said the province is “throwing the baby out with the bathwater.”

 

“You don’t discard a tool just because you’re afraid someone is going to misuse it; you figure out a system so that it does get used appropriately,” said Barrett, president of Barrett Enterprises Ltd.

 

The company has done full-tree harvesting since 1986, the majority focusing on land development and road building. Forestry accounts for a small percentage of the company’s work but can increase when the development sector slows.

 

“You have to have some place to send the crews,” Barrett said of his 15 to 20 employees. He worries he won’t be able to keep quality workers if he can’t guarantee work.

 

Barrett contends his work in forests is sustainable; cleared wood is chipped and sold to customers who use it for heating. Often his crews will help small woodlot owners harvest inan attempt to convert to Acadian forests or more diverse stands.

 

Jeff Bishop with the Forest Products Association of Nova Scotia said companies such as Barrett’s will face challenges with the ban.

 

Bishop estimates 120 direct jobs will be lost and $8 million worth of gear will be rendered unusable.

 

Bishop suggested the province develop rules for when the techniques can be used based on vegetation, soil type and location.

 

But Matt Miller, the Ecology Action Centre’s forestry co-ordinator, said he doubts that would work.

 

Miller said the tops and branches are the most nutrient-rich parts of a tree and need to be left behind.

 

Because there are already difficulties with compliance and enforcement, Miller said full prohibition is the right move.

 

With David Jackson, provincial reporter

( http://thechronicleh...vesting-methods )

 

So in 2013, the Nova Scotia Government has regulated what most sustainable harvesters had figured out 100 years ago. Timely.

 

And just who is going to be inspecting these cuts and assuring the regulations are enforced? Not a lot of that going on before this new plan.

 

Lastly, I always find it amusing when the guy doing the "deed" tries to defend it with the old "gonna lose jobs"..."gonna cost money" mantra in the media. They know that the Government is so bloody focused on jobs and tax dollars that they "can't see the forest for the clear-cut".

 

Twist the scary economic knife in the media and hope that the weak and bumbling government changes the deal or offers some form of compensation.

 

“You don’t discard a tool just because you’re afraid someone is going to misuse it; you figure out a system so that it does get used appropriately,” said Barrett, president of Barrett Enterprises Ltd.

 

Oh...there is a tool being misused here. We have all been "used" by the "tools that be". Appropriately and not.

 

Let's just see how this actually plays out.

 

Terran


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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#56 Terran

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 11:43 AM

For those interested in protecting what's left of our forests and keeping additional pollution from ruining any more of our environment (including our waters); this may be of interest.

 

Public input sought on new biomass rules

July 24, 2013 - 8:31pm MICHAEL GORMAN TRURO BUREAU

 

Sept. 20 deadline for comments

 

The province is seeking feedback on new biomass regulations.

 

 

Under the proposed regulations, organizations that burn wood or wood byproducts to generate 250 kilowatts or more of heat or electricity would need to register with the province. Reporting requirements for those using less than 1,000 cubic metres would be less stringent than for larger users.

 

To further simplify reporting requirements, those who have multiple businesses using biomass can submit one annual wood purchasing plan that covers all of the businesses. Biomass users that consume more than 5,000 cubic metres would have to provide the province with an annual wood purchase plan and contribute to silviculture programs needed to keep the woodlands sustainable.

 

People who use biomass to heat homes would be exempt from the proposed regulations.

 

“Having the best information on where wood fibre is flowing within the province allows industry and government to continue the sustainable supply of fibre we currently have,” Jeff Bishop, executive director of the Forest Products Association of Nova Scotia, said in a news release.

 

The proposed biomass regulations would not go into effect until Jan. 1, so fibre users have time to prepare. Biomass users would need to register with the province this year and report on their 2013 wood use by the end of February.

 

A discussion paper and instructions on how to respond are posted at novascotia.ca/natr. Comments can be submitted until Sept. 20.

(http://thechronicleh...w-biomass-rules )

 

Aren't you glad that the Government is so interested in what we think? Must be the reason for the quick deadline?

 

 

And if you think Canada is doing enough to protect it's forest's, you might want to give this article a read:

 

Paper: Boreal forests need help

- http://thechronicleh...rests-need-help

 

Something to think about.

 

Terran


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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#57 Terran

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 08:19 AM

Hefler Forest Products Ltd., located on the bank of the Sackville River (close to Webber Lake, on the Lucasville Road)(See Google Maps: https://maps.google....ova Scotia&z=16 ), has received approval from the Nova Scotia Government for it's Bio-Mass Project. (See Chronicle Herald: http://thechronicleh...k-from-province ).

 

The combined heat and power plant will be fueled by sawmill residue under a plan approved by Natural Resources.

 

So, let's just take a little time to look at the effects of this decision and then multiply it by the number of these proposals that our Provincial Government seems to be "Green Lighting" and even promoting around the Province.

 

The first thing that comes to my mind is Air Quality. I have recently developed a serious respiratory problem. Until now, I was fairly ignorant of air quality effects on people with respiratory diseases. Most people that don't have one or don't have somebody close to them, with one, are simply unaware of the effects air quality can have.

 

In my case, to put it as simply as possible, any type of "smoke" (BBQ, wood stove, forest fire, smokehouse, etc) takes my breath away. I become congested and breathing becomes VERY difficult. My situation is not as serious as that of some.

 

So you can imagine the idea of these Bio-Mass burners spread across the Province, all burning vegetation, is a concern to myself and a large number of others.

 

I wonder where the NS Lung Association is during these approval hearings? (My next email, by the way.)

 

Should all of these "Projects" get approval, how will this effect our air quality?

 

Let's move on to the bigger picture.

 

What effect does Bio-Mass burning have on the environment?

 

This would seem like a simple question, that say, Natural Resources or Environment Departments might ask....Right?

 

Well it doesn't take much effort to find some disturbing and (frankly) quite obvious information on the topic.

 

Bio-Mass Burning: http://earthobservat...BiomassBurning/

 

In this article, we learn among other things:

 

Since fires produce carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas, biomass burning emissions significantly influence the Earth's atmosphere and climate. Biomass burning has both short- and long-term impacts on the environment. Vegetation acts as a sink—a natural storage area—for carbon dioxide by storing it over time through the process of photosynthesis. As burning occurs, it can release hundreds of years worth of stored carbon dioxide into the atmosphere in a matter of hours. Burning also will permanently destroy an important sink for carbon dioxide if the vegetation is not replaced.

 

Hmmmm. That doesn't sound all that environmentally friendly. You might want to read this entire article. Including the links (in blue).

 

Here is a very informative Paper (PDF) on THE HARMFUL IMPACTS OF BIOMASS ENERGY GENERATION:
UNDERMINING THE FIGHT AGAINST GLOBAL WARMING
- http://massenvironme...t from MEEA.pdf

 

Simply a "must read" for anyone interested in how this Bio-Mass Energy idea will effect our environment.

 

I find this quote (from the above link) to speak volumes:

 

Incredibly, biomass emits as much PM (Particulate Matter) as coal, 1.5 times as much carbon monoxide (CO, a toxic air pollutant), and 1.5 times as much CO2 (the most important greenhouse gas) as coal.
 

But, I thought this was a "Greener and sustainable" energy solution? Mr. Dexter? Mr. Belliveau? Mr. Parker? Anyone?

 

Anyone want to comment on this "renewable energy" solution?

 

Here's another interesting article: Biomass Burning - Worse than Coal - http://blog.environm...-worse-than-co/

 

And the material just keeps coming. I could list dozens of studies and articles on the "environmental effects of biomass burning", or (if you are interested) Google Search the term quoted in red, above, for your own results.

 

Again, we have the Government that is going to "protect and conserve" 12-13% of our Province's wilderness approving the proliferation of these Biomass operations. The ones that will pollute our air quality and pump tonnes of particulate matter into our atmosphere providing such wonderful benefits as: carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, nitric oxide, methyl chloride, and various particulates.

 

This of course will add to the acid precipitation; further poisoning our fresh water, environment and destroying aquatic life.

 

Yeah, I can see how the ass-hatted Government might see this as sustainable, renewable, "green" or a good idea.

 

However, this will make it hell on Earth for some and surely end badly for the environment. But hey, that will be somebody else's problem, because these arseholes won't be around to have to deal with it.

 

People, it's time to start to fight for what you believe in before you are all sitting on a moonscape wondering what happened. It's getting out of control.

 

Terran


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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#58 IceShanty

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 08:30 AM

I agree its out of control.....
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#59 pmorris

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:54 AM

The miscanthus alternative should be better from a carbon recapture perspective, but I doubt if it improves the particulate matter issue. See http://www.profarmenergy.com/


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I started reading a book about anti-gravity and I just couldn't put it down.


#60 Terran

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 10:27 AM

The miscanthus alternative should be better from a carbon recapture perspective, but I doubt if it improves the particulate matter issue. See http://www.profarmenergy.com/

 

Paul,

 

I have come across the Miscanthus information in other research. The problem I see will be the availability of cheap alternatives in the short term. Companies that have an abundance of cheap fuel from their forestry operations will most certainly exhaust that "resource" before needing to turn to a "fuel crop".

 

Still, it does hold promise for when they run out of forest to burn.

 

The concern again is whatever is being burned, the resultant emmissions pose significant air quality and pollution consequences.

 

As you know, the City used to incinerate the bulk of it's waste. What an opportunity that would provide for energy generation? How about construction waste?

 

Once the door is opened, the less environmentally conscious will certainly start looking at the "benefits" of burning **** to generate energy. What choices will the Government pick and choose to accept?

 

Now, I'm not saying that this is probable (yet), however the door is opening on a slippery slope and our illustrious leaders have shown some significant judgement issues.

 

But, back to the current Biomass issue. Every project that is approved is just that much more crap pumped into the environment.

 

No matter what is being burned.

 

Terran


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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 





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