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Aquaculture Ass. Fights Back On New Website - Guess We're Getting Their Attention


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#301 Shimanoman

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 11:30 AM

Terry, my friend,

            Isn't this the way that it is supposed to be?  To agree to disagree and then wait for the fullness of time to see if one or the other's prediction is correct ....... without sinking into the morass of name calling and all of the other good stuff which comes with taking that path.  Happy new year and may the gods of better health visit you in 2016

 

Regards....


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#302 Terran

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Posted 29 January 2016 - 12:04 PM

Environment Groups have tried to appeal the approval of the genetically modified AquaBounty  "Frankenfish", however that is akin to trying to make water run uphill.

 

Environmental groups appeal ruling approving GM salmon production

THE CANADIAN PRESS 
Published January 29, 2016 - 9:59am 
Last Updated January 29, 2016 - 10:20am
 
HALIFAX — Environmental groups are appealing a Federal Court ruling not to overturn Environment Canada's decision to approve the production of genetically modified salmon eggs in P.E.I.
 
The Ecology Action Centre in Halifax is fighting the ruling which it says creates too much uncertainty about the environmental risks of commercially growing out the genetically-modified salmon.
 
The group's Mark Butler says federal scientists did not evaluate the salmon grow-out in Canada.
 
He says they're concerned about possible fish escapes and the risk to wild salmon.
 
 
The group and Living Oceans Society argued in court that the federal government did not follow its own legislated rules and conduct a full risk assessment before clearing AquaBounty to produce the eggs on the Island.
 
However, Judge Russel W. Zinn dismissed the claims and found the federal ministers' decisions were reasonable and followed the Canadian Environmental Protection Act.

 

Despite the obvious lack of proper evaluation the Government sticks to it's guns and the "Judge" in the appeal sides with the Minister. (Now there's a shocker)

 

What Canadian Environmental Protection Act? 

 

Are they referring to the stripped down, Omnibus struck and totally neutered Harper Crapfest... (formerly known as) the Canadian Environmental Protection Act?

 

Absolutely predictable!

 

"AquaAdvantage" to AquaBounty and their genetically modified sea turd ...er... Salmon. Can't wait for these horrific seamonsters to escape and start swimming our shores. Talk about an invasive species.

 

 

 

Terran


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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#303 StripperGuide

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Posted 04 February 2016 - 12:36 PM

Halifax, NS and Vancouver, BC – Open net-pen Atlantic salmon remains on the “Avoid” list after a new assessment outlines the ongoing threats posed by excessive chemical use, high levels of escapes, and the presence of persistent diseases in Atlantic Canadian farms. The Seafood Watch report, completed as part of the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s seafood recommendation program, also assessed farms in North East US, which have scored a “yellow,” or ”Some Concerns” ranking. These differed from Atlantic Canadian farms as they have lower disease outbreaks and the existence of a successful regulatory framework which includes protection for wild Atlantic salmon through a containment management protocol for escapes.

“This report confirms that there are significant problems with Atlantic Canada’s open net-pen finfish farming operations,” says Susanna Fuller of the Ecology Action Centre. “How is it that in Maine – just across the bay – net-pens owned by the same company have less disease and such fewer escapes? This very clearly indicates that the lack of regulations here in Canada is resulting in higher, and completely unnecessary, environmental damage.”

One of the major concerns facing both assessed regions is the extremely high levels of chemical use. Antibiotic and pesticide use in Eastern North American farms is significantly higher than other salmon farming regions in the world – 241 times higher than in Scotland and 204 times higher than Norway. Also, some of the chemicals used are listed as Highly and Critically Important to Human Health by the World Health Organization, according to the report.

“It’s alarming that such high amounts of chemicals, including antibiotics, are being used here in Atlantic Canada,” says Matt Abbott of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. “This is of particular concern as the Canadian government has recently weakened laws and regulations prohibiting the use of chemicals, with the introduction in summer 2015 of the Aquaculture Activity Regulations. Not only are there high amounts of antibiotics in the farmed salmon, the regulation of pesticide use is now significantly less that it was a year ago.”

A significant difference between the US and Canadian farms was the regulatory requirement to track all escapes back to the farm. In Canada, there are no such requirements, although the Nova Scotia government is in the process of developing a similar protocol as part of its recent regulatory changes.

“Impacts on endangered populations of wild Atlantic salmon as a result of aquaculture operations cannot be underestimated.” says National SeaChoice Manager Lana Brandt.

With wild Atlantic salmon listed as endangered in both Canada and the US, the additional threats created by open net-pens pose an unacceptable risk to the future of wild populations. We need to address these issues and create changes in our regulatory system to ensure that Atlantic Canada’s ocean ecosystems are not unnecessarily and irreversibly harmed by these open net-pen farms.
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#304 Terran

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Posted 05 February 2016 - 10:18 AM

Great post StripperGuide.

 

It has amazed me, from the beginning, that a Government can allow and even promote an industry without first putting regulations in place to "govern" such an industry. Talk about putting the foul, environmentally detrimental "cart before the horse".

 

Here in "Nova Scrotum" (ball-sac of the country) any carpet-beggar offering a job can get carte blanche approval from the pathetic Government types who are only to happy to sell our proverbial souls for a media piece announcing "they" brought a job to our "have not" little berg.

 

Salivating over potential taxes while selling short the potential of our environment has become so cliche that one expects such foolhardy action at every turn.

 

Mismanagement and not proper governance is the norm and sadly the people have come to expect and ignore it.

 

You need a Book of Regulations to go fishing, yet any fool in Government will allow an industry to blatantly destroy our ecology and they wait for ten to fifteen years before deciding (after public uproar mind you) to come up with regulations for said industry. (WTF?)

 

Sad, but government is a term to be used loosely.

 

Terran

 

(Just my opinion of course)


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#305 Shimanoman

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 10:26 AM

Stripper Guide-- Great Post!! Thanks

 

Terran-- Very sad but oh, so very true!!

 

Regards....


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#306 StripperGuide

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 04:06 PM



My post was copied and pasted from this group,it is a great read and bang on ...

http://www.seachoice...almon-as-avoid/
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#307 Terran

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Posted 17 February 2016 - 11:54 AM

Here is a sobering reminder of the ecological effect of open-pen salmon "farming":

 

Waste Contamination from Salmon Farms http://www.puresalmo.../pdfs/waste.pdf

 

If you remember the information I posted regarding the Loch Duart pollution listed by the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency there are no surprises from the above document. Yet, it is important, as a reminder, that this industry is producing gigantic numbers when it comes to pollutants and the resulting product is "garbage", the whole way around.

 

More to come.

 

Terran


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#308 Terran

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Posted 18 February 2016 - 09:24 PM

In past Posts, I have referred to information I have found on the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency website. This organization should perhaps be held up as an example of how our Government should handle freedom of information and accountability.

 

Those, with an interest, should take the time to check out the Scottish approach to environmental protection and in particular the accountability and openess to providing information.

 

In particular, I have acquired a mass of information by using the SPRI (Scottish Pollutant Release Inventory) section of SEPA's site. 

 

The Scottish Pollutant Release Inventory (SPRI) is a database of annual mass releases of specified pollutants to air, water and land from SEPA regulated industrial sites. It also provides information about off-site transfers of waste from these sites.

 

Here is a link: http://www.sepa.org....ntal-data/spri/  and here is a link directly to the database search site: http://apps.sepa.org...ch/Options.aspx

 

By simply clicking on the "Company Details" or "Industry Sector" links you are provided with the reported pollutants for the Company at it's sites. Within these pages, you can click on many words found on the page for definitions and further information. This comes in handy for explanations of pollutants, etc.

 

Try entering Cooke Aquaculture. You will get pages of aquaculture sites. You will have to go to the 2014 reports as the most recent years have not been filed and entered yet. Any site address, that appears in blue, you can click on and see the "reported" information. Some of the sites are fallow (contain no fish currently), but keep looking. Some of the numbers for these sites is stunning. Remember, this is only what they reported and still the numbers will amaze you.

 

For instance, Cooke Aquaculture's site "South Cava MCFF, Scapa Flow, Orkney" reported in 2014 releasing into the water:

 

Nitrogen  80,761 kg

Phosphorus 11,153 kg

Total Organic Carbon 259,108 kg

Zinc 228 kg

 

Or Cooke Aquaculture site "Cloudin MCFF, Burrastow" reported in 2014 rleasing into the water:

 

Emamectin benzoate (a pesticide) 0.484 kg

Nitrogen 119,809 kg

Phosphorus 16,545 kg

Total Organic Carbon 384,388 kg

Zinc 338 kg

 

These are just a couple of examples. Click on the chemical names on these form and find out exactly what they do and what risk they pose. Very disturbing...yet enlightening.

 

You could, just as easily, enter in the "Industry Sector" search - Intensive livestock production and aquaculture

This will bring up all the sites doing aquaculture in Scotland. You will have to enter a particular year for those returns, but again enlightening.

 

So the end result is information, freely available, from a GOVERNMENT website. Truly amazing concept.

 

The information is quite alarming and the numbers...disturbing. To say the least. However, this is the kind of information that people should be aware of when evaluating the "value" of promoting an industry.

 

Imagine how people might view the same kind of numbers in our own coastal waters. No wonder the Government, that's promoting this industry, doesn't want to publish this kind of information.

 

And again, these are the "reported" numbers. I wonder what gets dumped and is unreported?

 

Take a look. Do some of your own research. Know what it is we a allowing to proliferate along our coastline.

 

Terran


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#309 Terran

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 11:07 AM

So...does anybody else think we should search out Sterling Belliveau and ask that the Cooke fiasco in Shelburne be compensated from HIS pension?

 

Remember Sterling? Remember his promises to Shelburne as he shoveled tax dollars into Glen Cooke's pocket?

 

Well the promises weren't kept and the "Minister" in charge has flown the coop, yet we are stuck with having to deal with the mess left behind. Interesting how so-called educated individuals can get away with just the most stupid acts and call it Government.

 

NOW...Shelburne figures it should get the benefit of the funds (should they be returned) despite the fact that they refused to listen and backed the wrong horse. Guess desperation makes for bad calls.

 

Check this out...

 

Shelburne wants cash earmarked for Cooke

THE CHRONICLE HERALD 
Published February 29, 2016 - 7:46am 
Last Updated February 29, 2016 - 7:47am
 
Shelburne town council is calling on the province to spend millions earmarked for a fish processing plant on other economic development projects for the area.
 
Cooke Aquaculture had promised to use the money to open a processing plant in the town that would employ up to 300 people.
 
But the company announced in January that it had abandoned those plans.
 
Shelburne Mayor Karen Mattatall would like to see some of that money stay in Shelburne and create some much-needed jobs.
 
 
“Whatever portion of the original $25 million that was committed to building a processing plant in Shelburne should be redirected and dedicated specifically to economic development in Shelburne,” said Mattatall.
 
The provincial government had committed to making $25 million available to Cooke Aquaculture in 2012 if it expanded a feed mill in Truro, built a salmon hatchery in Digby County, and a processing plant in Shelburne.
 
Of that, $16 million was an interest-bearing loan, with $9 million forgivable if certain conditions were met.
 
Shelburne Town Council sent a letter to Premier Stephen McNeil last week, asking that some of that money stay in Shelburne. Mattatall hasn’t heard back from the province yet.
 
The province announced last month that it’s trying to recoup the repayable portion of its loan to Cooke Aquaculture.
 
The interest-bearing $18 million loan was supposed to be repaid over 10 years, starting Jan. 1 of this year.
 
Calls to Cooke Aquaculture on Sunday were not returned.
 
Mattatall said residents of Shelburne were anticipating the influx of jobs and are now feeling let down.
 
“It’s hugely disappointing,” she said. “It’s disappointing that taxpayers’ money has been used in this manner. It’s disappointing that they promised something that they didn’t fulfill. It’s disappointing to people who were looking forward to employment.”
 
She didn’t share any ideas for new economic development plans for the small town, but said she hopes the provincial government will be open to talking about future projects for Shelburne.
 
“The goal, of course, is for economic development that will create employment in the area,” she said.
 
“Since that was the initial purpose of the money, we believe it should come back to that.”
 
 
REEEAAALLLLYYY?
 
Shelburne backed the wrong player. Refused to see the wrong in what was being done to the environment. Supported a filthy industry. AND NOW want to get the money cause that didn't pan out?
 
What next? Coke ovens and horse shoe factories? Mass deforestation?
 
If Shelburne wants money for jobs, then they should make a case for a legitimate enterprise. It's not THEIR money. It is the tax-payers and we deserve better care be taken with it.
 
As for Cooke.   Are you surprised?
 
Terran
 

 


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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#310 Terran

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 11:08 AM

So...does anybody else think we should search out Sterling Belliveau and ask that the Cooke fiasco in Shelburne be compensated from HIS pension?

 

Remember Sterling? Remember his promises to Shelburne as he shoveled tax dollars into Glen Cooke's pocket?

 

Well the promises weren't kept and the "Minister" in charge has flown the coop, yet we are stuck with having to deal with the mess left behind. Interesting how so-called educated individuals can get away with just the most stupid acts and call it Government.

 

NOW...Shelburne figures it should get the benefit of the funds (should they be returned) despite the fact that they refused to listen and backed the wrong horse. Guess desperation makes for bad calls.

 

Check this out...

 

Shelburne wants cash earmarked for Cooke

THE CHRONICLE HERALD 
Published February 29, 2016 - 7:46am 
Last Updated February 29, 2016 - 7:47am
 
Shelburne town council is calling on the province to spend millions earmarked for a fish processing plant on other economic development projects for the area.
 
Cooke Aquaculture had promised to use the money to open a processing plant in the town that would employ up to 300 people.
 
But the company announced in January that it had abandoned those plans.
 
Shelburne Mayor Karen Mattatall would like to see some of that money stay in Shelburne and create some much-needed jobs.
 
 
“Whatever portion of the original $25 million that was committed to building a processing plant in Shelburne should be redirected and dedicated specifically to economic development in Shelburne,” said Mattatall.
 
The provincial government had committed to making $25 million available to Cooke Aquaculture in 2012 if it expanded a feed mill in Truro, built a salmon hatchery in Digby County, and a processing plant in Shelburne.
 
Of that, $16 million was an interest-bearing loan, with $9 million forgivable if certain conditions were met.
 
Shelburne Town Council sent a letter to Premier Stephen McNeil last week, asking that some of that money stay in Shelburne. Mattatall hasn’t heard back from the province yet.
 
The province announced last month that it’s trying to recoup the repayable portion of its loan to Cooke Aquaculture.
 
The interest-bearing $18 million loan was supposed to be repaid over 10 years, starting Jan. 1 of this year.
 
Calls to Cooke Aquaculture on Sunday were not returned.
 
Mattatall said residents of Shelburne were anticipating the influx of jobs and are now feeling let down.
 
“It’s hugely disappointing,” she said. “It’s disappointing that taxpayers’ money has been used in this manner. It’s disappointing that they promised something that they didn’t fulfill. It’s disappointing to people who were looking forward to employment.”
 
She didn’t share any ideas for new economic development plans for the small town, but said she hopes the provincial government will be open to talking about future projects for Shelburne.
 
“The goal, of course, is for economic development that will create employment in the area,” she said.
 
“Since that was the initial purpose of the money, we believe it should come back to that.”
 
 
REEEAAALLLLYYY?
 
Shelburne backed the wrong player. Refused to see the wrong in what was being done to the environment. Supported a filthy industry. AND NOW want to get the money cause that didn't pan out?
 
What next? Coke ovens and horse shoe factories? Mass deforestation?
 
If Shelburne wants money for jobs, then they should make a case for a legitimate enterprise. It's not THEIR money. It is the tax-payers and we deserve better care be taken with it.
 
As for Cooke.   Are you surprised?
 
Terran
 

 


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#311 Terran

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 10:01 AM

So AquaBounty and their GMO (Genetically Mutated Organism) the AquaAdvantage Salmon (otherwise known as FrankenFish) are back in the news. Apparently, some others and their organizations are concerned that the Americans and the FDA have approved something that may be harmful to the environment (God knows what it'll be like for humans).

 

Here is the brief article from the Chronicle Herald:

 

 Environmental groups launch suit against FDA over engineered salmon

THE CANADIAN PRESS 
Published April 1, 2016 - 7:58am 
Last Updated April 1, 2016 - 8:54am
 
salmonedit.jpg
The plaintiffs argue that the FDA ignored comments people opposed to the approval, and failed to analyze potential risks to wild salmon and the environment. (STAFF)
 
HALIFAX — A coalition of environmental and fishing groups is suing the U.S. government for approving an Atlantic salmon engineered to grow quickly.
 
The salmon was created by AquaBounty Technologies in P.E.I. with DNA from three fish and is the first engineered animal approved for human consumption in the States.
 
The Canadian and American groups launched the suit against the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday.
 
The plaintiffs, including the Ecology Action Centre in Halifax, argue that the FDA ignored comments from nearly two million people opposed to the approval, and failed to analyse potential risks to wild salmon and the environment.
 
They say there is a risk the modified salmon could escape and threaten endangered wild salmon stocks.
 
AquaBounty plans to produce the salmon eggs in P.E.I. and grow them out in Panama, where they will be processed into fillets and shipped to the States for sale.

 

 

Interesting to note, there is NO mention, whatsoever, of the Canadian Health Department, Canadian Food Inspection Agency or any Canadian Government Department in this piece.

 

The Company, "AquaBounty plans to produce the salmon eggs in P.E.I. ", yet our Government has allowed the U.S. to take the lead (and the heat) on this important topic. Apparently, our Government doesn't have an opinion (or clue) about this contentious issue.

 

We simply allow the "Yanks" to make the call and then follow with our tails between our legs. True Government at work.

 

I have posted much about AquaBounty and their "FrankenFish" experiment in this topic. Needless to say, I'm not a big fan. When this thing gets loose, nobody knows what the ramifications will be in the wild.

 

The facility that is growing these things is in Prince Edward Island. If they escape containment there, we'll be dealing with them soon enough. (Mind you, might make for some great fishing. But, talk about invasive's!)

 

Company's, playing God and creating monsters with mutated DNA is not something that we need so they can make more money... cheaply. 

 

Plus...Would you eat the thing?

 

Terran


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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#312 Shimanoman

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 12:18 PM

Although the Minister of Fisheries is the political face to all, or most of these regulatory changes or permits which are granted, the advisors, or power behind these policies or changes to them is actually held by the senior "civil servants" up to and including deputy ministers.  These folks have great job security, nor are they ever identified as the authors of bad policy or ill-advised loans.  I believe the time has come for the long overdue unmasking of these persons and calling them to account for their poor performance in their duty to this province.  I am not saying that the politicians are blameless, however, when they rely heavily on advice from their departments regarding policy etc,etc,"adjustments" ought to be made in those same departments.  My interpretation of "adjustment" would include termination of employment.  We, the people, have the opportunity to "terminate" our politicians but it seems our power does not extend to the upper echelons of the "civil service"....pity.   It might be interesting to look into how cozy the Cookes of the world are with senior civil servants.

Just a thought

 

Regards......


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#313 Terran

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 10:07 AM

"Legislate The Removal Of Caged Salmon From Our Oceans"
 
On March 29, 2016 a landmark Petition to the Government of Canada was sponsored by Canadian Liberal MP Bernadette Jordan.
 
While our new Minister of Fisheries is beginning to repeat the meaningless statements of the previous Ministers who brought this industry to this country, Member of Parliament Bernadette Jordan has given us the opportunity to set the record straight on how we feel about other countries using our coasts to flush their farms.
 
"We, the undersigned, citizens (or residents) of Canada, call upon the Government of Canada to Legislate the removal of caged salmon from our oceans."
 
Please sign and share with everyone you know who cares about the fish that feed the trees that make the oxygen we breath. We may never get another opportunity like this one.
 
Only Canadians can sign this - but if you are from another country, perhaps you could congratulate this member of parliament here is her email address: [email protected]
 
Update - over 1,000 people have signed in the past 12 hours since I posted this!  Many are having trouble with the petition, but I thank you for persisting and/or contacting MP Jordan to make her aware of the problem. 
 
 
(Copied from Alexandra Morton's Typepad site)
 
 
 
Great way to let the Government know we want this "Crap Factory" out of our waters.
 
Terran

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#314 Terran

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 07:32 PM

So, Cooke Aquaculture has purchased Icicle Seafoods, a U.S. salmon farming, fishing and processing firm?

 

“The closing of this deal will be an exciting venture for us as it will add a well-respected fishery to our family businesses,” Glenn Cooke, president of Cooke Seafood Inc., said in a news release. “We have tremendous respect for the Alaska fishery and its highly valued brand in the seafood marketplace.”

 

This is upsetting on two fronts. One - that's all Alaska needs. Might as well have sold to Exxon. And Two - Is Cooke using the money (that as far as I know) is still owed to the Nova Scotia Government for failure to meet it's promises in this Province?

 

The company’s dispute with the province over repayment of a loan to support the construction of salmon processing plant in Shelburne and hatchery in Digby made headlines earlier this year.

 

Here is the article from the Chronicle Herald:

 

Cooke Aquaculture buys U.S. salmon producer Icicle Seafoods

THE CHRONICLE HERALD 
Published May 10, 2016 - 7:03pm 
 
Cooke Aquaculture, one of Atlantic Canada’s largest seafood producers, has purchased Icicle Seafoods, a U.S. salmon farming, fishing and processing firm.
 
The company announced the purchase Tuesday. Once closed, the deal will enhance the Cooke family’s investments in both the wild fishery and the aquaculture sectors.
 
“The closing of this deal will be an exciting venture for us as it will add a well-respected fishery to our family businesses,” Glenn Cooke, president of Cooke Seafood Inc., said in a news release. “We have tremendous respect for the Alaska fishery and its highly valued brand in the seafood marketplace.”
 
 
The deal will include Icicle’s three business units, which harvest and process more than 150,000 metric tonnes of seafood annually such as wild salmon, groundfish and farmed Atlantic salmon.
 
Icicle’s salmon farm, which produces around 7,250 tonnes of salmon a year, would give Cooke a foothold on the west coast of North America.
 
“The Icicle team is excited about the opportunity to join the Cooke family of companies and to be able to focus on the expansion of our footprint in Alaska,” Christopher Ruettgers,CEO of Icicle Seafoods Inc. said in the release.
 
He said the deal provides Icicle with a long-term owner that is dedicated to the seafood industry.
 
“The partnership with Cooke also means access to capital to further modernize our platform, expanded market access for the products harvested by our fleets and a broader product offering for our customer base.”
 
With this latest acquisition, the Cooke group of companies will produce more than 275,000 metric tonnes of seafood annually and generate $1.8 Billion in annual sales. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.
 
Cooke has operations across Nova Scotia including fish farms in Digby County, Shelburne Harbour, Jordan Bay, McNutts Island, St. Margaret’s Bay, and one farm near Liverpool.
 
The company’s dispute with the province over repayment of a loan to support the construction of salmon processing plant in Shelburne and hatchery in Digby made headlines earlier this year.
 

 

Maybe the Discovery Channel will pick up on this and we'll soon be turning in to watch "Dirtiest Catch". Pretty sure it'd give Sig and the boys of "Deadliest Catch" a run for their money. Who wouldn't want to watch pristine Alaskan waters polluted, poisoned, infected and eventually ruined?  :blink:  :angry:

 

It'll be interesting to see how this venture pans out in Alaska and whether the American's will tolerate the Cooke brand of business.

 

Just my humble opinion, anyway.

 

Terran


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#315 Terran

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 10:21 AM

Frankenfish will soon be on your store shelves thanks to the "wonderful insight" of our Government SHEEP. 

 

Yes, it's true. We will soon be able to purchase the AquaAdvantage genetically modified monster in our local "Fresh Fish (?)" Department. That is if they are willing to carry it.

 

Here is the latest story from the Herald:

 

Canadian regulator approves sale of fast-growing, genetically modified salmon

THE CANADIAN PRESS 
Published May 19, 2016 - 6:36pm 
Last Updated May 19, 2016 - 7:15pm
 
OTTAWA — Canadian grocery stores have received the regulatory green light to begin selling fast-growing, genetically modified salmon — the first such species to gain such approval from federal agencies.
 
Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced Thursday they had completed a scientific review of AquAdvantage's salmon and it has passed the final regulatory hurdle for the farmed fish.
 
The fish was developed by U.S.-based biotechnology firm AquaBounty Technologies Inc. to promote rapid growth of the fish during early life, using a growth hormone gene from the Chinook salmon in an Atlantic salmon.
 
The company has one facility in Canada, in Bay Fortune, P.E.I., and a production centre in Panama.
 
 
Dave Conley, a spokesman for the firm, said in an email that it will be a year or more before the firm has any production of market-sized fish.
 
The agencies say in a news release the fish have met the key hurdle of being "as safe and nutritious for humans and livestock as conventional salmon."
 
The regulators also said genetically modified foods are becoming more common every day and are a regular part of Canadians' diets.
 
However, an alliance of environmental groups raised questions about the review process, arguing there wasn't sufficient public input and — at the very least — the fish should be labelled.
 
"Canadians could now be faced with the world's first genetically approved food animal, approved with no pubic consultation and no labelling," said Lucy Sharratt of the Canadian Biotechnology Action Network.
 
Labelling is voluntary, said Rola Yehia, national manager of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, during a conference call.
 
"Since in this case there is no health risk identified, there is no requirement for mandatory labelling," she said during a conference call.
 
Conley said in an email that the firm hasn't made any decisions on whether the fish will be labelled with his firm's brand or an indicator the fish are genetically modified.
 
NDP Health critic Don Davies said his party believes Ottawa must move to make labelling mandatory.
 
"If it is safe ... then labelling should not be an issue. It's just an issue of consumer protection and their right to know," he said.
 
Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay said a special committee will examine the issues surrounding the genetically modified food and make recommendations on possible labelling.
 
"It's a decision for the committee," he said, adding he expects a report back by the parliamentarians on the issue by the end of the year.
 
AquaBounty has said it plans to produce the salmon eggs in P.E.I. and grow them to full size in Panama, where they will be processed into fillets and shipped back to Canada for sale.
 
The process has drawn a campaign of public opposition and legal actions from environmental groups.
 
The Ecology Action Centre and Living Oceans Society say in a news release they've launched a court action against the federal approval in 2013 of commercial production of genetically modified fish eggs and fish, and that case is ongoing.
 
— By Michael Tutton in Halifax.

 

 

So...anybody gonna line up for a sample of this stuff?

 

"Canadians could now be faced with the world's first genetically approved food animal, approved with no pubic consultation and no labelling," said Lucy Sharratt of the Canadian Biotechnology Action Network.
 
Labelling is voluntary, said Rola Yehia, national manager of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, during a conference call.
 
"Since in this case there is no health risk identified, there is no requirement for mandatory labelling," she said during a conference call.
 
Labelling is voluntary?  Uh, only because of our pathetically weak Canadian Food Ignoring, er...Inspection Agency and an even weaker Canadian Government. And who can forget Health Canada, now there's a useful duo.
 
Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced Thursday they had completed a scientific review of AquAdvantage's salmon and it has passed the final regulatory hurdle for the farmed fish.
 
So exactly what did these two agencies review? The FDA's reports, perhaps? Was there any actual science done here, on Canadian soil by our "Government Watchdogs" on Health and Food Safety?
 
You might find this take on the same issue a little more enlightening: http://ecowatch.com/...ves-gmo-salmon/
 
One has to hope that people will find the GMO issue a bit distasteful and hopefully push to have the crap kept out of their local market. At the very least, people should be screaming to have this **** properly labeled.
 
For those interested, here is another interesting report on this issue: Genetically engineered fish:
An unnecessary risk to the environment, public health and fishing communities http://libcloud.s3.a...neered_fish.pdf
 
Now here's an interesting read, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans "Environmental and Human Health Risk Assessment of the AquAdvantage Salmon" http://www.foodandwa...ent_Scanned.pdf
 
Now what you may find interesting in this report is the redacted portions. Why the hell does DFO have to redact an assessment such as this? UNLESS...there's something there. Hey..it's all good...right? It's been approved.
 
So the bottom line seems to be this; yes the crap has been approved through whatever feeble process our Government required. Are there questions and issues surrounding it's environmental and even health impacts...it would appear so. Should it have to be labelled for sale...ABSOLUTELY! Do I trust that the Government got this one right...NOPE. Will I or my loved ones be eating this (uh..er) "Fish"...NOT A CHANCE IN HELL!
 
Something to think aboout and just my humble opinion anyway,
 
Terran

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#316 Terran

Terran

    To do nothing is unacceptable.

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 09:01 PM

As much as I enjoy/will take shots at elected folks for their "inadequacies", I also have to give credit when it is due.

 

Fisheries Minister Keith Colwell has stepped up and made a statement, in an article in the Chronicle Herald, that I not only hope he is genuine about, but that he sticks to his guns on. Here is the article I'm referring too:

 

Nova Scotia says no to genetically modified fish

ANDREA GUNN | OTTAWA BUREAU 
Published May 20, 2016 - 8:21pm 
Last Updated May 20, 2016 - 8:22pm
 
Provincial fisheries minister rejects production of eggs, wants no GMO connection

 

Production of genetically modified fish will not be welcome in Nova Scotia any time soon, according to provincial fisheries minister Keith Colwell.
 
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency on Thursday gave the green light to supermarkets to sell a type of fast-growing genetically modified salmon being developed by U.S.-based AquaBounty. Colwell told the Chronicle Herald Friday that the province is working on policy to officially ban the farming of GM fish here.
 
“We really don’t want any connection with the GMO salmon. We have a system that works in the province now and that works very well, and we don’t want to interfere with something that works very well,” Colwell said.
 
Salmon are the first genetically modified animal to be approved for human consumption in Canada. The U.S. gave them the okay in November.
 
AquaBounty has one facility in Canada, in Bay Fortune, P.E.I. where the eggs are produced and a farm in Panama where the fish mature into adults. Colwell said his government would not allow even the production of eggs in Nova Scotia.
 
“We’re more interested in making sure we protect what we have,” he said. “Until someone can prove to us and to the public that this will be a good idea — and I don’t see much support anywhere for this — we’re not interested.”
 
Colwell also said he is concerned about the impact accidentally introducing genetically engineered fish would have on natural populations from both an ecological and sport fishing standpoint.
 
Meanwhile, fish farmers in Nova Scotia are wary but not overly worried about the impact of introducing modified fish into the market.
 
Susan Farquharson, executive director of the Atlantic Canada Fish Farmers Association doesn’t think people are interested in buying GM fish where other options are available, and said she believes the markets will make that clear.
 
“The same decision was made back in November in the U.S. and we still don’t see consumer demand for the AquaBounty products. In fact I think you’re seeing the exact opposite. We know what the demands are, we’ve been helping supply that global demand for decades. We know our consumers want a healthy sustainable product,” she said.
 
Keith Havercroft, CEO of Queens County-based salmon farming operation Sustainable Blue, said because of his company’s strong branding he is not worried with people confusing his product for genetically modified salmon,. But with no regulations in Canada mandating GMOs be labelled it’s something consumers should be concerned about.
 
In response to Thursday’s announcement, Nova Scotia’s Ecology Action Centre, which is one of the plaintiffs involved in a lawsuit against the U.S. government over the FDA’s approval of genetically modified salmon, issued a press release calling for mandatory labelling of all genetically modified food in Canada and a boycott of AquaBounty fish by supermarkets.
 
South Shore-St. Margarets MP Bernadette Jordan said she stands behind the decision to approve genetically modified salmon for human consumption due to strong scientific evidence that it is safe, but said she understands concerns in the aquaculture community.
 
Jordan said she hopes labelling of GM food is something that is considered by the agriculture committee in future debate.
 
“It’s my understanding, this product is not going to market for at least a year and a half, so they do have some time to look at those concerns they’re hearing.”
 
 
Bravo Mr. Colwell. You have made a small step forward in beginning to manage the Aquaculture mess. "No" should be a term used more frequently with regard to this industry.
 
However, I am concerned with your assertion that, "We have a system that works in the province now and that works very well, and we don’t want to interfere with something that works very well,”   (WTF?)
 
Are we discussing the same (aquaculture) system?
 
Hey, let's not ruin a moment with something stupid like your take on our aquaculture dealio.
 
Mr. Colwell has stepped out and stated that we don't want the Frankenfish here.
 
I think that's what he's saying anyway and (for now) I'll give him credit for not sending AquaBounty hand written invitations on Provincial stationary.
 
Oh, by the way, the fact that the above article on this topic seemed to state that the fish would be raised in Panama is not lost on me either. But, the Minister said no to something aquaculture and quite scary so we give him points for trying.
 
Terran

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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 





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