First Time - Smelt - Nova Scotia Fishing

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#1 jharlow

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 12:58 PM

Never fished for smelt before but would like to give it a try this week wondering if anyone has some advice on a spot to try and what I should be using ,picked up some premade smelt rigs ...
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#2 ___

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 01:33 PM

Smelt bite very lite, use and up and down, slow rise and fall motion. If you notice your line going to one side of the hole then you have a smelt on. Small pieces of shrimp (shrimp ring), blood worm, grass shrimp, etc will work. Usually as the tide is coming in is commonly good, as well sunrise and sun set. Use smaller tear drops if you want to attempt to "feel" the bite. Most times you won't feel it, it will feel more like it's stuck on something, or like I said before the line moves to the side of the hole. Some people experiment with foos coloring their bait, red is usually a good choice.

You don't need to be in a lot of water for smelt. I find eel grass is a good sign when setting up. Watch for tommy cod! ;)

Old school techniques dictated the use of a small strand of red yarn on a bare hook. They had luck!

Cheers,
Trav
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#3 mushamush

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 01:34 PM

Hi JH
The salt water ice on the south shore is none too safe yet but if you see
a group fishing smelts - either in shacks or sitting on the ice, you are good.
Get right in the middle.
On the Northumberland strait side - same deal.
There you will be fishing in less water - a meter or so and you can see the fish easier.
Putting something white or grey on the bottom helps. Mashed potatoes, oatmeal
When you see them it is easier to tell how deep you should fish.
We always used the throat of the smelt for bait - after the first one that is.
They have kind of jigging rigs in Quebec but I never saw them here. Worked
good in the video.
Spears were good also - no fooling with lines.
My grandfather used red and white yarn tied to a nail. The teeth caught in the yarn
and held the fish til it was out of water. Only needed to give it a shake to get it off
the nail and as they travel in bunches, you could have it down much quicker
than fooling with bait. Didn't need to take of your mitts either on a cold day!
Have a good day
Paul
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#4 jharlow

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 09:47 PM

By the look of the weather I might have to wait till next year hopefully I'm wrong wanted to get some of those tasty buggers. :)
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