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Plan To Reopen N.s. Mine In Gays River


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#41 Terran

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 10:51 PM

Bob_Marlo,

Here is an interesting piece of information that I believe pertains to this river and yet seems to have been ignored: Environmental impact of the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations on fish habitats - http://www.oag-bvg.g...9B_e_30161.html

Here is an overview of the project: http://www.gov.ns.ca....Appendixes.pdf

You'll note in the Private assessments, that contamination has already occured due to stockpiling close to the river and wetlands.

This is a lead/zinc ore that is being mined. Lead contamination has most likely already occurred. YET, nobody seems to give a ****!

This mine has an issue with hydological issues due to groundwater infiltration. There it sits, mere metres from the river - YET nobody in the Government seems to care. Hey it's a proposed 100 jobs. After they stip the place bare and the jobs are gone - who cares if the river or the Shubie are destroyed. Who cares if heavy metals render the fish inedible and full of birth defects.

Not our Government!

This stuff is slipping under the radar all the time and nobody is calling them on it. Check out this site on Google Earth. Not only a mine site on a river, but clear cut to hell. So where are the independant government environmental assessments?

Not surprised water in the area is contaminated. Can't wait till the Shubie get's the same. Maybe then folks will start screaming?

Sorry about the rant. This topic is really a pet peeve of mine. Blatant environmental threat - totally ignored.

My opinion anyway,

Tight Lines (Just don't eat the fish),

Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#42 Terran

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 07:45 AM

N.S. Lets Selwyn Expand Mine in Gays River

Hey Folks,

The above headline appeared in this mornings "Business Section" of the Chronicle Herald. Here is a link to the story: http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/99412-ns-lets-selwyn-expand-mine-in-gays-river

This is bad news for the Gays River and the Shubie/Stewiacke system, in my opinion. Guess it is a wait and see issue, now.

Commerce wins out over the Environment again. Lets hope that there will be some monitoring of this site, however I am skeptical.

Hope I'm totally wrong about this one, but when it gets up and running, I'll be waiting and watching.

Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#43 raven4ns

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 11:16 AM

Terran, I hope you aren't waiting for the government to do anything or you'll be waiting a long time. You could take all the politicians and you wouldn't find 1 ******** among them let alone 2. The other piece they are missing is backbone so with those 2 important pieces gone you get what we have for politicians.

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All the best

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#44 rpen

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 09:08 AM

Another story about a Government that cares not for the environment or your personal property! Don't ever think that your property is actually your property in Nova Scotia!!!
http://thechronicleh...oose-river-land
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#45 basindawg

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 10:50 AM

$$$$$ ALWAYS wins. Gov't doesn't give a crap about wildlife . bad business. no money in it.
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#46 Perry

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 11:38 AM

It is a sad commentary that our Gov. will encourage foreign companies to come and exploit our resources. This one is so bad for me as it is a rural business owned by a NS family that is being expropraited for a foreign company with a wave of the hand with promises of jobs and huge wealth that in the end goes out of province. It's the same with small mills owned by NS families that get no help form Governent and have gone under and others that will. All the same time we hear of millions going into foreign companies to encourge them to stay here. Then we are asked to buy back the land that was given them with the promise of wealth and jobs.
The aquaculture industry is the same. Jobs and rural economy will benifit is the rational.. What about the jobs that small NS owned business provides and stand a good chance to go under? THey dont count! What about the jobs that are lost in the open pit gold mine will displace. They might get a job at the mine but that wouldn't be a gain would it?
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Just because you fish a lot doen't mean you are great or even good. It just means you fish a lot!!


#47 LSF

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 12:39 PM

Sad very sad!!! Remember this at Election time folks along with the support the NDP has given to aquaculture and all the services that the Dexter Govn has cut!!
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#48 Terran

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 09:54 AM

Hey Gang,

There were a couple of mining stories, in this weeks Chronicle Herald, that should maybe raise some alarms. As we are all aware, mining has never been considered an environmentally "friendly" endeavour.

That these mining interests pose a threat to sensitive areas, already stressed, is quite disturbing.

The first story, I'll post, pertains to the ScoZinc Mine in Gays River. As anyone who's read this topic is aware, this mine is almost "in" the Gays River. The Gays River runs into the Stewiacke/Shubinacadie River system. The last successful spawning river system in Nova Scotia for Striped Bass.

This open pit mine has water issues and the original approval of the mine was to "divert" the river in order to mitigate run-off from the mine. NEVER HAPPENED.

The mine produces lead and zinc ore. On the site is an ore processing plant that in the past has also been used (and is currently capable) of processing gold ore.

This story appears in the Herald and here is the link: Increased zinc, Lead Finds Located at Gays River - http://thechronicleh...d-at-gays-river

Here is the story:

Increased zinc, lead finds located at Gays River
August 24, 2012 - 7:39pm By BRETT BUNDALE Business Reporter

A Vancouver junior mining company has discovered an unexpected resource bonanza at its Gays River mine in Nova Scotia.

Selwyn Resources Ltd. announced a significant increase in zinc and lead deposits at its Colchester County mine in a mineral resource update Friday.

“These very positive results of a 55 per cent increase in measured mineral resources are derived from a combination of a low-cost, thorough data evaluation from the historical records at the mine site and the 2011 definition drilling program,” Jason Dunning, vice-president of exploration, said in a press release.

“The updated mineral resource for the Gays River deposit has resulted in significantly more zinc-lead mineralization that provides the engineering staff with more flexibility in updating the mine plan.”

Catalin Chiloflischi, manager of investor communications, said the encouraging mineral resources update means the Nova Scotia mine will have a longer lifespan than previously anticipated.

The resource company completed its $10-million acquisition of the ScoZinc operation, previously known as the Scotia mine, in June 2011, from Acadian Mining Corp. of Halifax.

The company has faced an uphill battle since acquiring the lead and zinc mine, starting with costly conditions tacked on to its environmental approval and the theft of nearly $20,000 of copper cable.

Delays in getting financing in place have also pushed back the mine’s opening.

Selwyn has projected an opening date for the mine in early 2013.

In May, the company received an industrial permit from the province that allows for an expansion of the mine.

Obtaining the permit from the Environment Department means the Vancouver company can access the balance of a $10-million debt facility it negotiated with Waterton Global Value LP.

The company was able to draw $2 million from those funds, with the rest conditional upon receiving the industrial permit.

A debt facility is used by companies like a line of credit to cover operating costs and is not part of the larger amount raised through capital financing to initiate a major project, such as a resumption of mining and processing at ScoZinc.

The British Columbia company is expecting to secure major financing due to anticipated international shortages of lead and zinc.

The reopening of ScoZinc at Gays River is a prelude to Selwyn’s primary project in the Yukon.

The joint venture with Chihong Mining Canada Mining Ltd. is described as the largest undeveloped reserve of lead and zinc in the world.

([email protected])

The second story, related to mining, is the reopening and search expansion of the Dufferin Mine on the Eastern Shore. Gold mining, notorious for not exactly being environmentally friendly, poses the potential for contamination of waterways and the coastal waters of the Eastern shore. As if with the proposed start ups of open-pen aquaculture sites in this area there needs to be any other threats to coastal waters.

This also ties in with the Gays River mine as this is a possible site for ore, from the Dufferin Mine, to be processed.

This story appeared in the Chronicle Herald on August 23, 2012. Here is the link: Company Expands Gold-Search Project - http://thechronicleh...-search-project

Here is the story:

Company expands gold-search project
August 23, 2012 - 7:03pm By REMO ZACCAGNA Business Reporter

Ressources Appalaches buys 554h on Eastern Shore

Ressources Appalaches Inc. has acquired Eastern Shore land adjacent to where the company is preparing to relaunch a gold project.

The Quebec exploration company said Thursday that it has agreed to buy the Dufferin East property from Acadian Mining Corp. of Halifax.

The purchase of the 554-hectare property means the entire project is now composed of Dufferin North, Dufferin Mine, Dufferin East and Chocolate Lake, all of which are on the same anticline structure about 8.4 kilometres long.

“This is definitely a strategic acquisition,” Alain Hupe, president of Ressources Appalaches, said in a telephone interview.

“It was very important for us to acquire it as soon as possible to have the possibility to extend the project in the future.”

Under the agreement’s terms, Acadian will receive $125,000, with $50,000 paid on signing and the balance due on the six-month anniversary.

Additionally, Acadian will retain a two per cent net-smelter-return royalty on the claims that may be purchased by Ressources Appalaches for $1 million.

Grant Ewing, president and chief executive officer of Acadian, could not be reached as of Thursday evening.

But in a statement, the company said the transaction is part of its strategy to sell non-core assets that will benefit the exploration and development of open-pit gold mines such as the Fifteen Mile Stream and Beaver Dam projects.

“The majority of the company’s resources will be focused on developing its core assets for the foreseeable future; thus the monetization of some non-core assets will provide the company with funds that can be directed toward development of its core projects, allow the company to build an attractive royalty portfolio, and relieve Acadian of some property holding costs,” the statement said.

In 2011, Acadian drilled a hole at the Dufferin East property at a depth of 150 metres and located an anticline structure with several strata-bound laminated quartz veins similar to those already observed in the Dufferin Mine area.

The acquisition means that Ressources Appalaches now has more than doubled the length of the anticline structure related to the Dufferin deposit to 3.8 kilometres.

“So we will continue exploration work, and we’ll have the samples analyzed, and we’ll see after that if there is gold,” Hupe said. “But it’s the same structure that we have at Dufferin, and we are 99 per cent confident that it’s there.”

This week, the company also secured $1.3 million in financing that will help it complete the first phase, which entails removing the natural deposits of water that has built up in the mine.

“So we have all the necessary money to dewater the mine,” Hupe said.

Once that is done, he said the timeline calls for the mine to be restarted in eight months and to be in full production in 12 months.

The mine is expected to produce 20,000 to 25,000 ounces of gold in its first year of production and employ about 50 people when fully operational.

“On the surface, we have all the infrastructure to proceed, we just need to go underground,” Hupe said. “The first thing we will do is do some sampling to be sure that everything is there from the past production that has been done there, and with that, we will be able to restart.”

Ressources Appalaches stock on the Toronto Stock Exchange closed Thursday at seven cents a share, down one cent.

Acadian Mining shares closed at seven cents apiece, up one cent.

([email protected])


So there is the latest on the mining situation.

Again, I'm all for creating jobs in rural communities and expanding economic growth in our Province, as long as it doesn't endanger the fragile environment and the delicate balance that a number of our ENDANGERED SPECIES rely on.

Our Government has shown little concern when it comes to selling out the environment for short term gain.


Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#49 pmorris

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 10:09 AM

Terran,

Any idea what the "costly conditions tacked on to its environmental approval" were?

Paul
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#50 Terran

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 09:15 AM

Hey Paul,

Yeah, they had a list of conditions tacked on to their Environmental approval by the N.S. Minister for the Environment.

You can take a look at the ScoZinc Operations Southwest Expansion Environmental Assessment at http://www.gov.ns.ca...e.expansion.asp

Here is the PDF containing the "conditions" that the Minister set for the approval: Gays River Mine Expansion - Conditions : http://www.gov.ns.ca.../conditions.pdf

It is obvious that the Environment Department , at least, recognized the potential for problems in this case and set out some significant conditions.

Strangely enough, I find when companies are paid to do assessments, they tend to favour the party signing the cheque. You see it with Aquaculture as well. It would be nice if more "independent" assessments were stipulated or actually performed by third parties or Government.

It is also of concern that all of these regulations and conditions are of no use if there is insufficient manpower and ability to closely monitor and enforce them. I'm thinking "Budget Cuts".

It remains to be seen if sufficient "conditions" have been imposed on this project. The sad fact is that if "not" the resulting affects could have a devastating impact. If Striped Bass spawning were disrupted, it might actually not be recognized immediately and the "cause" pinpointed until it is too late.

Yes, you would notice an accident or immediate fish kill, but accumulated or gradual affects resulting in decline or cessation in the spawn might go unnoticed until the result is irreversible.

This sensitive area wasn't scrutinized as closely as perhaps it should have been. In my opinion, anyway.

Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#51 pmorris

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 10:45 AM

Hey Paul,

Yeah, they had a list of conditions tacked on to their Environmental approval by the N.S. Minister for the Environment.

You can take a look at the ScoZinc Operations Southwest Expansion Environmental Assessment at http://www.gov.ns.ca...e.expansion.asp

Here is the PDF containing the "conditions" that the Minister set for the approval: Gays River Mine Expansion - Conditions : http://www.gov.ns.ca.../conditions.pdf

It is obvious that the Environment Department , at least, recognized the potential for problems in this case and set out some significant conditions.

Strangely enough, I find when companies are paid to do assessments, they tend to favour the party signing the cheque. You see it with Aquaculture as well. It would be nice if more "independent" assessments were stipulated or actually performed by third parties or Government.

It is also of concern that all of these regulations and conditions are of no use if there is insufficient manpower and ability to closely monitor and enforce them. I'm thinking "Budget Cuts".

It remains to be seen if sufficient "conditions" have been imposed on this project. The sad fact is that if "not" the resulting affects could have a devastating impact. If Striped Bass spawning were disrupted, it might actually not be recognized immediately and the "cause" pinpointed until it is too late.

Yes, you would notice an accident or immediate fish kill, but accumulated or gradual affects resulting in decline or cessation in the spawn might go unnoticed until the result is irreversible.

This sensitive area wasn't scrutinized as closely as perhaps it should have been. In my opinion, anyway.

Terran


Thanks for the link! I agree with your observations. I found it interesting that only a couple of species of fauna were listed specifically and I wonder how and why those species were singled out.

Nice to see the security bond in 14.2. I'd like to see public disclosure of the amount of the bond and the name of the party providing it, since its financial well-being is key to the ability to fund reclamation costs should the mining company run into financial difficulty.

Thanks again,
Paul
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#52 Terran

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:39 PM

Hey All,

The Gays River Mine saga continues. Back on November 22, an article appeared in the Chronicle Herald.(Unfortunately, things have kept me from posting this until now.)

Owner eyes ticking clock on mine restart
November 22, 2012 - 5:27pm By JOANN ALBERSTAT Business Reporter

Selwyn hopes it can reopen ScoZinc by end of 2013

The owner of the ScoZinc mine says financing must be in place early next year for it to restart the Colchester County operation by the end of 2013.

Selwyn Resources Inc. released an update Thursday on its mine plan, which the company’s president and chief executive officer said should be more attractive to potential lenders.

“We’re pretty optimistic that we can get it done now,” Harlan Meade said in an interview from Vancouver.

The junior mining company revised the plan to smooth out projected cash flows from the Gays River site over a seven-year period. Selwyn previously expected to see a temporary dip in profit during the fourth year of operation, when mining moves from one pit to another.

“That was really a problem for the lenders,” Maede said. “They didn’t want that down year.”

The improved cash flow is possible because of the results of a mineral resource update in August. The update boosted estimates for measured resources by 55 per cent and indicated resources by 65 per cent.

“That allowed us a lot more flexibility in the designing of the pits,” Meade said.

ScoZinc was slated to begin production this spring, but Selwyn was forced to push back the date because of difficulty securing financing.

The resource company has spent more than $8 million, so far, on the restart plan and expects to need another $31 million.

Selwyn bought the lead and zine operation, previous known as Scotia mine, from Acadian Mining Corp. of Halifax in June 2011 for $10 million.

Meade said the company hopes to secure financing by early in the new year. After that, it will take about eight months to complete the pre-stripping and remaining refurbishment before full production can begin.

The mining company president is upbeat because the global economic outlook is improving and higher zinc prices are expected next year.

“If zinc prices are where we think they will be in 2014, we’ll pay back the whole debt capital in one year.”

ScoZinc will have adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization that averages $24.8 million annually during its first five years of production, Thursday’s update said.

About 10 people are still working at the mine, where maintenance and engineering work continue, down from about 30 earlier this year.

The mine is expected to employ 120 people when it is fully operational.

Selwyn shares were trading at four cents apiece on the TSX Venture Exchange late Thursday afternoon, up half a penny from their previous close.

([email protected])

Hopefully, either the financing falls through or the price of these metals drops. I hate to wish ill on anyone, but the sensitivity of this area must take precedence to any economic opportunity. The stakes are just too high.

On the Selwyn Resources website, there was an interesting (and informative) posting under "News" for the same date.

November 22, 2012

Selwyn's New Mine Plan for ScoZinc Project Provides a Strong Basis for Project Financing

Selwyn is pleased to announce results of an update to the October 7, 2011 ScoZinc Preliminary Economic Assessment (“PEA”) Report for the restart of the ScoZinc zinc-lead project in Nova Scotia, Canada. The PEA Update indicates excellent potential for a seven-plus years mine life. Provided that debt financing for the project can be obtained by the first quarter of 2013, pre-stripping would begin in the second quarter of 2013 and full operation in the fourth quarter of 2013. Although negotiations are in progress with potential financing parties, at this date no project finance agreement has been concluded. (read more...)


Check out the link (read more) above. These people have some rather grand designs for this site, including the operation of two open pit mines on the site.

This only doubles the possibility of serious issues regarding contamination of the Gays River and the Stewiacke/Shubinacadie waterways.

Terran

P.S.: Thanks Rpen for the information
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#53 Terran

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:36 AM

Hey All,

While reading the folowing article in the Chronicle Herald, it occurred to me that this province could be facing similar problems with the Lead/Zinc mine in Gays River.

B.C. refinery must foot river cleanup bill
December 16, 2012 - 7:38pm By DENE MOORE The Canadian Press

Columbia River has been a dumping ground of the mine for decades

TRAIL, B.C. — On a beach in northeast Washington state near the Canadian border, Patti Bailey grabs a handful of what looks like sand and rolls the dark grains through her hands.

It’s slag, the grainy waste from the Teck Resources lead and zinc smelter in Trail, B.C., about 10 kilometres north of the nearby Canadian border.

“They’re little time bombs and they’re releasing zinc, copper, arsenic and other metals into the environment,” said Bailey, an environmental planner for the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation.

A Washington state judge has ruled that Teck is liable for the costs of cleaning up contamination in the Columbia River south of the border from decades of dumping slag and effluent from the company’s Trail operations.

In a decision announced late last week, Judge Lonny Suko ruled that, “for decades Teck’s leadership knew its slag and effluent flowed from Trail downstream and are now found in Lake Roosevelt, but nonetheless Teck continued discharging wastes into the Columbia River.”

Suko noted that the company admitted treating the international waterway as a free waste disposal service. Specifically, the judge in Yakima, Wash., found that from 1930 to 1995, Teck intentionally discharged at least 9.97 million tons of slag that included heavy metals such as lead, mercury, zinc and arsenic.

The judge also found that Teck knew the hazardous waste disposed of in the Columbia River was likely to cause harm. The decision gives the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency the ability to force Teck to pay for the cleanup, and potentially for any ongoing damages and losses that result from the ongoing contamination. That issue has yet to be determined by the court.

Some believe the landmark case could have implications for mining and other industrial interests on both sides of the border. The Canadian government, the province of British Columbia and the U.S. National Mining Association have all intervened in the case to argue that the issue should be resolved bilaterally.

As they awaited the judge’s decision, Washington state officials were optimistic.

“We’re hopeful after… how many years has it been?” joked Kristie Elliott, lawyer for the Washington state Attorney General. “After this much significant litigation we’re now finally to the substance of the case.”

Eight years after the case was launched and on the eve of a trial this fall, Teck admitted to discharging slag and liquid effluent into the river from 1896 to 1995. But it argued the U.S. law that forces companies to clean up contamination sites, known as the Superfund law, was never intended to reach across the international border.

But Elliot said complaints about the contamination from the Trail smelter surfaced as early as the 1940s, when farmers from Washington state sued Cominco, Teck’s predecessor, over air pollution from the smelter. That case was eventually resolved in arbitration by the two federal governments, and set a precedent for cross-boundary pollution law.

“Still, they continued to discharge, and they knew it was accumulating in Lake Roosevelt and that studies being done by various government agencies were finding mercury contamination down there,” Elliott said.

Within the fences of the largest smelting operation in North America, about a billion and a half dollars has been spent modernizing Teck’s Trail Operations over the past 25 years. A new furnace installed in 1996 cut emissions dramatically.

Last month, Teck completed a $5.8-million project to reduce the risk of a spill into the river. The company is now installing a $1.2-million automated leak detection system, and a $125-million acid plant that will reduce sulphur dioxide emissions a further 15 to 20 per cent. Recycled lead makes up about 20 per cent of total production and anything that can be used or recycled is, right down to granules of slag sold for processing into Portland cement.

“The employees who work here at Trail Operations live in this local area, and participate and take part in everything it has to offer,” said Richard Deane, manager of environment, health and safety at the smelter. “It’s a great area from an outdoor quality of life perspective. Everyone here enjoys the benefits of the river — swimming, kayaking, fishing, all these types of things.”

The company has also spent tens of millions of dollars on environmental rehabilitation, from digging up contaminated gardens and bringing in replacement soil, to replanting dead trees. Lead emissions have decreased from about 100 tonnes a year in the early 1990s to about half a tonne last year.

Teck is now taking aim at “fugitive dust” emissions, covering raw materials stored outdoors, and is building an indoor facility for all mixing processes that stir up dust. That has not been the case south of the border, say the Colville tribes.

Years of discussions went nowhere, so they petitioned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1999 to assess the river contamination under the U.S. Superfund law. The agency found the river was indeed contaminated, and it found Teck was responsible. That’s when the legal battle began. Frustrated by the lack of action, two band members launched civil action eight years ago. The legal wrangling has gone all the way to that country’s highest court — the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear Teck’s appeal.

The price tag for the cleanup alone in Washington state has been estimated at $1 billion.

Vancouver-based Teck Resources Ltd. ended fiscal 2011 with a $4.4 billion profit.


One of the statements that I find troublesome pertains to "fugitive dust" emmissions.

Teck is now taking aim at “fugitive dust” emissions, covering raw materials stored outdoors, and is building an indoor facility for all mixing processes that stir up dust.

Being in such close proximity to the river, this could certainly be an issue at the Gays River facility.

I understand we are not exactly talking about the same type of situation, but there is certainly similar products and the possibility of contamination is still very real.

Maybe the Province will simply change the name from Gays River to the Lead River. The Stewiacke and Shubie Rivers could be renamed "Once" and "Was" Rivers.

Something to think about.

Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#54 Shimanoman

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 02:27 PM

Perhaps the question of the "fugitive dust" treatment could/should be raised by the opposition critic and answered by the NS Minister of Natural Resources PRIOR to to the reopening of the mine. At the very least, it would afford the minister the opportunity to address a problem that he, quite possibly, did not know exists. If so, the minister could pro-actively solve the problem before it was created by the re opening of the aforementioned mine. Asking the question in the legislature. at the very least, will refuse this government the ability to use the defense of "plausible deniability".

Regards....
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#55 Terran

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 09:03 AM

Perhaps the question of the "fugitive dust" treatment could/should be raised by the opposition critic and answered by the NS Minister of Natural Resources PRIOR to to the reopening of the mine. At the very least, it would afford the minister the opportunity to address a problem that he, quite possibly, did not know exists. If so, the minister could pro-actively solve the problem before it was created by the re opening of the aforementioned mine. Asking the question in the legislature. at the very least, will refuse this government the ability to use the defense of "plausible deniability".

Regards....


Shimanoman,

I will make an effort to compile some data and provide it (once again) to a number of elected representatives. Your suggestion may pay some dividends.

It is a sad state of affairs, that those being paid for their knowledge on topics such as this seem totally incapable of seeing the "big picture". Our tax dollars pay salaries for departments such as Natural Resources, Environment and Fisheries, yet there seems to be little value for the dollars spent.

You would expect that these departments and their staff would see the possibilities of contamination by this operation and be able to link this to the Stewiacke/Shubie system and the possibility of damages being done to one of the last spawning rivers for Striped Bass in Nova Scotia.(?)

What exactly are they doing when these assessments are being performed? Do they not look beyond the immediate site?

I mean, take a look at this site: http://maps.google.c...Scotia&t=h&z=14 (Sorry. I tried to centre the mine but it keeps placing it in the upper right of the image. Just drag it to the centre.)

Is that a stream I see running out of the lower "tailing" pond into the River? Does the Government have Google Maps?

Anyway, we'll see what can be done. Anyone who wants to get involved and send some emails - feel free.

Best of the Season, Shimanoman (and all)

Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#56 rpen

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Posted 29 December 2012 - 10:55 AM

http://thechronicleh...inds-us-backers

http://www.ressource...ect.php?page=21
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#57 Terran

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 09:51 AM

Hey Rpen,

Yeah, I caught that article in the Herald. The Dufferin Gold Mine re-opening is another area that poses environmental concern. Also, if they start producing, it opens the possibility of gold ore being processed at the Gays River site.

Take a close look at the Google Maps link to the Gays River site. The tailing pond to the bottom - look closely. There is a stream flowing out of it and into the river. Nice.

As the Gays River and Dufferin sites are developed it will be interesting to see what damage will be done.

Thanks for the links Rpen.

Have a Safe and Happy New Year,

Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#58 Terran

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 08:27 AM

Here may be a chance for those who want to make a difference.

(So, having misread the article below, I posted "with great excitement", a plea to action. As I am deeply passionate about this topic, I probably read what I was "hoping" to read.

Thankfully, Rpen, who obviously reads better than I, posted and helped me to understand the actual meaning of the words in green below. So instead of rewriting or editing the original post, I decided to use some editing notes (IN RED) to correct my mistake. Hope all will still see the importance of the post,Terran)

Found this article in the Chronicle Herald:

Sale key to N.S. mine’s fate
March 27, 2013 - 5:12pm By BRUCE ERSKINE Business Reporter

B.C. company asks shareholders to approve $50-million transaction

The future of the ScoZinc mine in Gays River, Colchester County, hinges on an upcoming shareholders vote in Vancouver, B.C.

In a letter to shareholders, the president and chief executive officer of Vancouver-based Selwyn Resources Ltd. said the $50-million sale of the company’s half interest in the Selwyn Project to partner Chihong Canada Mining Ltd. is critical to restarting the Nova Scotia zinc and lead mine.

“Absent the transaction, and in light of current equity market conditions, it is unlikely that the company would be able to raise the funds necessary to maintain operations and achieve its objectives, and as a result, there has been significant doubt cast on the company’s ability to continue as a going concern,” Harlan Meade said in a letter filed with the System for Electronic Document Analysis and Retrieval.

“Chihong Canada has provided a cash purchase price deposit of $5 million, and Selwyn will use such funds for working capital and to satisfy a portion of its repayment obligations under its outstanding debt with Waterton Global Value, L.P.

“The company is scheduled to receive a second deposit of $5 million on April 9, 2013, pursuant to the terms of the purchase agreement for the transaction. The company will use the net proceeds from the sale of the company’s interest in the joint venture, after repayment of the balance of the Waterton Facility, to restart the ScoZinc mine and general corporate purposes.”

The Selwyn Project consists of 7,450 hectares of mineral claims in Yukon and 2,162 hectares of mining lease lands in the Northwest Territories.

Meade said the restart of the ScoZinc zinc and lead mine, “is an important near-term strategic objective” in making Selwyn Resources a producing company.

“The completion of project financing and the achieving of production at the ScoZinc mine will fulfil the company’s longer-term objective of becoming a producing mining company over the intermediate term,” he said.

“The sale of the company’s interest in the Selwyn Project is seen as the best alternative for achieving this goal and addressing current obligations to creditors.”

The ScoZinc mine operated between 2007 and 2009 under former owner, Acadian Mining Corp.

The mine was shut down when zinc and lead prices dropped during the 2008-2009 global financial crisis. Selwyn acquired the mine in 2011 for $10 million.

Before agreeing to the Chihong transaction, which has been unanimously recommended by Selwyn’s board of directors, the Vancouver company had taken steps to prepare a filing under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act.

“However, given the current market climate, the board of directors of Selwyn … believed that there was significant uncertainty in that course of action, and that pursuit of the transaction would be in the best interests of the company and its stakeholders,” Meade said in the letter.

Selwyn shareholders will vote on the transaction at the company’s annual meeting, which will be held on April 22 at its head office in Vancouver.

The transaction must be approved by 66 per cent of the votes cast by shareholders in person or by proxy.

If the transaction is approved, Selwyn Resources will have no further interest in the Selwyn Project, and its joint-venture agreement with Chihong will be terminated.

The transaction is subject to certain conditions and regulatory approvals, including the receipt of certain Chinese regulatory approvals and the approval of Yunnan Chihong Zinc & Germanium Co., Ltd., Chihong’s parent company.

Selwyn stock was trading for 6.5 cents a share on the TSX Venture Exchange Wednesday, down slightly from its previous close.

([email protected])

This may be the opportunity needed to sway some heads and have this ill-conceived project put down permanantly.

(Always a good idea)

With the new Chinese mining company, coming into the picture, there will be further scrutiny of this project.

The transaction is subject to certain conditions and regulatory approvals, including the receipt of certain Chinese regulatory approvals and the approval of Yunnan Chihong Zinc & Germanium Co., Ltd., Chihong’s parent company.

(The Chinese company is actually interested in purchasing a project in the Yukon. Which is actually better news in some ways)

Now is the time to start communicating our concern (once again) to the government, MLA's and even the Chinese mining interest involved. An email blitz, at this juncture, may bring enough "scrutiny" to bare that the deal might be put to rest...for good.

(Actually, it wouldn't hurt to put some pressure on the Yo-Yo's who have given Selwyn Resources the green light on the Gays River Mine. Lord knows they are apparently oblivious to the ecological impact it could reap)

Here is a link to the Chihong Canada Mining Ltd website: http://www.chihongca....com/index.html

An email explaining your concerns and possibility of future protest might get some attention.

( :D Yup, email Chihong Canada and ask them not to buy the Yukon Project so Selwyn can't start the Gays River mine. Sounds logical...right?)

Definately, emails to Environment Canada, Fisheries and Aquaculture, NS Environment and anybody else involved might make a difference at this point.

Here is a link to the Provincial Governments website: http://gov.ns.ca/government/

(Please: there still may be hope to get this reversed!)

Please take some time, familiarize yourself with the issue (read through this topic and check out the links provided) and take a few minutes to email somebody who might pay attention. (PLEASE)

If this project goes through, especially with this new Chinese company (who are actually buying in the Yukon and have nothing to do with Gays River) (not known to be environmental crusaders: the Chinese mining industry)(This statement is actually fairly acurate;from what I have read); this mining project could spell the end for Gays River, the Shubie and Stewiacke and the Striper spawning grounds that are so fragile. (Too True)

I hope some will put their "money where there mouth is" and step up and at least give it a try. What could it hurt. (Wow, that parts right too.)

Looks like I have a busy weekend ahead. (Always. I am going to put this issue into an email and try again)

Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#59 rpen

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 12:41 PM

Terran, I believe you incorrectly read the article. To me Selwyn is selling it's 50% stake in the "Selwyn Project" in the Yukon to finance a quicker start up at Gays River! I don't believe the Chinese are involved in Gays River, but I may be wrong. http://www.selwynres...om/en/index.cfm
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#60 Terran

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 01:16 PM

Rpen,

Just re-read the article and did some checking and you are correct. In my excitement to have an opportunity to squash the ScoZinc mine; I did misread the article. :(

However, there is still hope! We could contact the Chihong shareholders and try to stop the Yukon sale :D ; which is paramount in their financing plans and opening the Gays River Mine.

Or...we could still make a concerted effort to bring attention to how this mining operation (ScoZinc Gays River) poses a serious and unjustifiable threat to a species at risk and it's spawning rivers.

Rpen, thanks for keeping an eye on me man. ;) Mornings can be crazy around here. :rolleyes:

I still hope that there is a chance to stop this project. In my opinion the Gays River mine is simply not worth the possible ramifications.

Now...should I change the above (mistaken) post or simply leave it as is? Any opinion?

Thanks again,

Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 





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