Have You Seen This Creature? - Striped Bass Fishing - Nova Scotia Fishing

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Have You Seen This Creature?


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#1 striperquest

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 10:59 AM

The Bay of Fundy is world famous not just for its incredible natural beauty and enormous tides, but also for the rich abundance of pre-historic fossils which can easily be found along its shores. Paleontologists the world over flock to the Bay of Fundy to comb its beaches and towering rock cliffs, unearthing remnants from a myriad of long extinct creatures that once inhabited the region. But did you know there's another living, breathing, outdated relic that still roams these shores? It's true, and even though their numbers are in sharp decline, if you look very closely you can still spot them from time to time.

Its scientific name is Tyrannopsaras (from the Greek meaning Terrible Fisherman). A primarily carnivorous species whose diet consists mainly of inexpensive fast food and dark rum, but during certain times of the year is heavily supplemented with large numbers of undersized striped bass. Opportunists and social creatures by nature they generally prefer to hunt in small, less detectable groups of two or three individuals, however they are also known to hunt completely alone. Their physical appearance and manner of dress is astonishingly similar to our own (particularly amongst the younger of the species who seem to take a more active interest in personal hygiene than their elders) with the only notable exception in appearance to ours being a curious discolouration of all three of their teeth. Their language is also remarkably similar. Aside from an obvious tendency to slur any words containing consonants or vowels as well as a distinct propensity for the use of profanity near children, much of the time their language could easily be mistaken for english. Your best bet for observing one of these oddities in their natural habitat is to locate an easily accessible stretch of shoreline on a bright, clear, sunny day during normal working hours. If you happen to find yourself in close proximity to one of these evolutionary throwbacks no need to be alarmed. Once offered the requisite peace offering of a Timmy's double double or a free smoke, they're generally harmless to humans and can actually be rather jovial and deceptively charming. On the other hand if you happen to be a striped bass watch out. They're brutally lethal.

Like its distant cousin the Tyrannosaurus Rex, Tyrannopsaras also seems to be afflicted with the same wildly disproportionate body mass to brain ratio which helped make Tyrannosaurus Rex such an effective and ruthless predator in its day. With all the compassion of a house cat mauling a wounded bird, Tyrannopsaras can often be observed in the wild playing stripers well past the point of exhaustion, dragging their fragile, near lifeless catch ruthlessly across a jagged stretch of rocky beach before haphazardly lobbing it back into the water without so much as a passing thought to the suffering and damage they are inflicting on another living creature. Sometimes though, like overgrown toddlers, Tyrannopsaras behavior can be mildly amusing - even comical to watch as they triumphantly display their prized catch to others in the group, all too slowly passing it from one to another and back again with huge toothless grins and bloodshot eyes beaming with pride - their grossly undeveloped rum soaked intellect clearly incapable of grasping even the simplest of concepts such as fish don't actually breathe air. They're almost cute somehow.

In stark contrast to this behaviour, there is growing anecdotal evidence that Tyrannopsaras may have a special affinity (and perhaps even an uncharacterstic softspot) for local shorebirds. Principally Larus Smithsonianus (the common Herring Gull). The exact nature of their relationship with these gulls in not well understood, however stories abound from countless anglers who've witnessed Tyrannopsaras catching large numbers of so-called nuisance species such as Tommy Cod, Flounder, Eel, and Skate - and instead of releasing this unwanted by-catch safely back into the water where they are essential to the overall health of the ecosystem - Tyrrannopsaras have been observed ritualistically slaughtering these fish en masse by bashing their heads against rocks or leaving them to slowly suffocate and bake alive in the sun - whereupon immediately after Tyrannopsaras's departure from the area, the waiting gulls swoop in and eagerly help themselves to an easy meal. Strange behaviour indeed on Tyrannopsaras part, considering the Herring Gull is a very efficient scavenger in its own right and does not need Tyrranopsaras's help in any way. Exactly what power or sway these gulls hold over Tyrannopsaras is not yet clear and requires further study.

According to researchers at the Fundy Centre for Estuarine Research in Windsor, Tyrannopsaras numbers in the region are dwindling at an ever increasing rate, with fewer and fewer sightings every season. Those same researchers say that the primary cause of their rapid demise is the age old formula for adaptation and natural selection. Tyrannopsaras live in a very different era. Frozen in time. No longer relevant in a modern world where an elementary school education just isn't enough anymore - where big words and even bigger concepts like mortality rates, sustainability, environmental stewardship, and compassion for all living things are understood by every 2nd grader - pea brained Tyrannopsaras is just plain irrelevant. And in true Darwinian fashion they are going the way of their distant cousins. Unfortunately though, given the notoriously fickle pace of evolutionary change, just not quickly enough.
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#2 Derbyram

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 11:45 AM

The Bay of Fundy is world famous not just for its incredible natural beauty and enormous tides, but also for the rich abundance of pre-historic fossils which can easily be found along its shores. Paleontologists the world over flock to the Bay of Fundy to comb its beaches and towering rock cliffs, unearthing remnants from a myriad of long extinct creatures that once inhabited the region. But did you know there's another living, breathing, outdated relic that still roams these shores? It's true, and even though their numbers are in sharp decline, if you look very closely you can still spot them from time to time.

Its scientific name is Tyrannopsaras (from the Greek meaning Terrible Fisherman). A primarily carnivorous species whose diet consists mainly of inexpensive fast food and dark rum, but during certain times of the year is heavily supplemented with large numbers of undersized striped bass. Opportunists and social creatures by nature they generally prefer to hunt in small, less detectable groups of two or three individuals, however they are also known to hunt completely alone. Their physical appearance and manner of dress is astonishingly similar to our own (particularly amongst the younger of the species who seem to take a more active interest in personal hygiene than their elders) with the only notable exception in appearance to ours being a curious discolouration of all three of their teeth. Their language is also remarkably similar. Aside from an obvious tendency to slur any words containing consonants or vowels as well as a distinct propensity for the use of profanity near children, much of the time their language could easily be mistaken for english. Your best bet for observing one of these oddities in their natural habitat is to locate an easily accessible stretch of shoreline on a bright, clear, sunny day during normal working hours. If you happen to find yourself in close proximity to one of these evolutionary throwbacks no need to be alarmed. Once offered the requisite peace offering of a Timmy's double double or a free smoke, they're generally harmless to humans and can actually be rather jovial and deceptively charming. On the other hand if you happen to be a striped bass watch out. They're brutally lethal.

Like its distant cousin the Tyrannosaurus Rex, Tyrannopsaras also seems to be afflicted with the same wildly disproportionate body mass to brain ratio which helped make Tyrannosaurus Rex such an effective and ruthless predator in its day. With all the compassion of a house cat mauling a wounded bird, Tyrannopsaras can often be observed in the wild playing stripers well past the point of exhaustion, dragging their fragile, near lifeless catch ruthlessly across a jagged stretch of rocky beach before haphazardly lobbing it back into the water without so much as a passing thought to the suffering and damage they are inflicting on another living creature. Sometimes though, like overgrown toddlers, Tyrannopsaras behavior can be mildly amusing - even comical to watch as they triumphantly display their prized catch to others in the group, all too slowly passing it from one to another and back again with huge toothless grins and bloodshot eyes beaming with pride - their grossly undeveloped rum soaked intellect clearly incapable of grasping even the simplest of concepts such as fish don't actually breathe air. They're almost cute somehow.

In stark contrast to this behaviour, there is growing anecdotal evidence that Tyrannopsaras may have a special affinity (and perhaps even an uncharacterstic softspot) for local shorebirds. Principally Larus Smithsonianus (the common Herring Gull). The exact nature of their relationship with these gulls in not well understood, however stories abound from countless anglers who've witnessed Tyrannopsaras catching large numbers of so-called nuisance species such as Tommy Cod, Flounder, Eel, and Skate - and instead of releasing this unwanted by-catch safely back into the water where they are essential to the overall health of the ecosystem - Tyrrannopsaras have been observed ritualistically slaughtering these fish en masse by bashing their heads against rocks or leaving them to slowly suffocate and bake alive in the sun - whereupon immediately after Tyrannopsaras's departure from the area, the waiting gulls swoop in and eagerly help themselves to an easy meal. Strange behaviour indeed on Tyrannopsaras part, considering the Herring Gull is a very efficient scavenger in its own right and does not need Tyrranopsaras's help in any way. Exactly what power or sway these gulls hold over Tyrannopsaras is not yet clear and requires further study.

According to researchers at the Fundy Centre for Estuarine Research in Windsor, Tyrannopsaras numbers in the region are dwindling at an ever increasing rate, with fewer and fewer sightings every season. Those same researchers say that the primary cause of their rapid demise is the age old formula for adaptation and natural selection. Tyrannopsaras live in a very different era. Frozen in time. No longer relevant in a modern world where an elementary school education just isn't enough anymore - where big words and even bigger concepts like mortality rates, sustainability, environmental stewardship, and compassion for all living things are understood by every 2nd grader - pea brained Tyrannopsaras is just plain irrelevant. And in true Darwinian fashion they are going the way of their distant cousins. Unfortunately though, given the notoriously fickle pace of evolutionary change, just not quickly enough.

Very good and frighteningly close to the truth.
I still have to see a fish of any sorts being'played'at my local zoo's of the guzzle and blue beach,but I did see a tommy being drop kicked up the stones at blue beach last week,much to the delight of other fisher men,a sickening sight.
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#3 massbaster

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 01:46 PM

Satire, my favourite.

I think I spotted one of these yesterday. It was using a lawn chair parked about half way up the beach. Every time it caught a fish it just hauled it up over the rocks instead of getting up off its lazy arse and doing it right.
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#4 bakerthree

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 03:45 PM

Satire, my favourite.

I think I spotted one of these yesterday. It was using a lawn chair parked about half way up the beach. Every time it caught a fish it just hauled it up over the rocks instead of getting up off its lazy arse and doing it right.

Maybe there should be a rule put in writing and enforced to the treatment and release of fish.
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#5 Billy

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 04:49 PM

Maybe there should be a rule put in writing and enforced to the treatment and release of fish.

I'm pretty sure it's already law that if you don't intend to keep the fish you need to release it as quickly as possible while doing as little harm to the fish as possible. It should definitely be more enforced though.
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#6 fisherdan1

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 10:25 PM

It doesn't matter what you say or do in my opinion these people just don't give a sh#t and they will never change because their pea sized brains aren't capable of making a smart decision...not to mention they don't have any respect for anything.
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#7 Terran

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 08:39 AM

Striperquest,

Absolutely brilliant, satirical post! Laughing my a** off! :lol:

And yet, I know exactly the motivation behind it. It is sad that these throw-backs to years of plenty are still prowling our shorelines.

All I can suggest is not to give up. Take pictures, get licence plate numbers (when possible) and report their **** to DFO until you drive them crazy.

Don't give in to the "there is nothing that can be done" attitude. Inaction is as wrong as what they are doing.

Great post "Striperquest".

Tight Lines,

Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#8 girlfisher

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 06:17 PM

Striperquest,

Absolutely brilliant, satirical post! Laughing my a** off! :lol:

And yet, I know exactly the motivation behind it. It is sad that these throw-backs to years of plenty are still prowling our shorelines.

All I can suggest is not to give up. Take pictures, get licence plate numbers (when possible) and report their **** to DFO until you drive them crazy.

Don't give in to the "there is nothing that can be done" attitude. Inaction is as wrong as what they are doing.

Great post "Striperquest".

Tight Lines,

Terran

x100 terran is right on the money report them if they are doing things illegal(keeping undersized etc) nothing will ever change if noone stands up and speaks out

love the post striperquest.... too funny and frightenly so true of many


gf
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please practice a sustainable harvest

#9 Perry

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 06:37 PM

I agree great post! Funny but to damn true!!
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Just because you fish a lot doen't mean you are great or even good. It just means you fish a lot!!


#10 striperquest

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 08:13 PM

Thanks for the feedback everyone. I almost didn't post that - I wrote it just after getting back from a day at Summerville Beach (my first time there) and witnessing some pretty frustrating things. Initially I thought it might be a little too mean spirited, perhaps even a little elitist, but then I said so what. If someone is offended by it then just maybe they deserve to be…and just maybe it will give them pause for thought.

The main reason I did post it though was to get an impression of how others here feel about this sort of behaviour, and how exactly you folks handle these situations when they arise. Obviously its generally not a good idea to confront someone directly, but on the other hand what's left?

Terran you made some very good and very specific suggestions which I will adopt immediately. Particularly the pictures. I'm not sure if its possible or what the legal implications might be, but perhaps the administrators here might consider " a wall of shame" gallery where users could post pictures of offenders…never mind, I can see how tricky that could become.

Again, thanks for the comments. I'm very relieved to see I'm in good company here.
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#11 pmorris

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 05:44 PM

Like its distant cousin the Tyrannosaurus Rex, Tyrannopsaras also seems to be afflicted with the same wildly disproportionate body mass to brain ratio...


I was with you until the above bit and then I started wondering if they are related. After all, how would they cast with such short arms? But then again, maybe that's why they keep undersized fish. They consider anything over an arm's length to be OK.

I remain confused and bewildered and suggest DNA testing as a means to resolve the issue. Unfortunately, this would involve teaching the Tyrannopsaras how to spell "DNA".

Paul
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I started reading a book about anti-gravity and I just couldn't put it down.


#12 striperquest

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 07:26 PM

I was with you until the above bit and then I started wondering if they are related. After all, how would they cast with such short arms? But then again, maybe that's why they keep undersized fish. They consider anything over an arm's length to be OK.

I remain confused and bewildered and suggest DNA testing as a means to resolve the issue. Unfortunately, this would involve teaching the Tyrannopsaras how to spell"DNA".

Paul


Posted Image :lol:
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“Politicians are like diapers; they need to be changed often and for the same reason.” Mark Twain

#13 pmorris

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 07:48 PM

Posted Image Posted Image



This is precisely why they're extinct. If they'd evolved from the Popeil Pocket Fisherman to the Rocket Fishing Rod, they'd still be roaming the Earth.

Paul
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I started reading a book about anti-gravity and I just couldn't put it down.


#14 EvilSquish

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 08:15 PM

That was byfar the best (and somehow the saddest) read I've seen in ages... wow
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Here fishy fishy fishy!

#15 Terran

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 08:33 PM

Posted Image :lol:


Striperquest,

Fan - freaking- tastic! (LMAO) :lol: :lol: :lol:

Like your sense of humour.

Thanks for the gut - buster.

Terran
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"In these sad and ominous days of mad fortune chasing, every patriotic, thoughtful citizen, whether he fishes or not, should lament that we have not among our countrymen more fishermen."  Grover Cleveland
 


#16 fishon

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 08:45 PM

I think that's what Ron Popeil looks like on his day off without the makeup. He's older than time but richer than Midas.
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#17 striperquest

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 01:41 PM

This is precisely why they're extinct. If they'd evolved from the Popeil Pocket Fisherman to the Rocket Fishing Rod, they'd still be roaming the Earth.

Paul


Paul, OMG that thing's hilarious. I didn't know what you were talking about until I just looked it up. I wish I knew about that before I photochopped the pocket fisherman. Thank you.
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“Politicians are like diapers; they need to be changed often and for the same reason.” Mark Twain

#18 S Jollymore

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 02:37 PM

Very good and frighteningly close to the truth.
I still have to see a fish of any sorts being'played'at my local zoo's of the guzzle and blue beach,but I did see a tommy being drop kicked up the stones at blue beach last week,much to the delight of other fisher men,a sickening sight.


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#19 S Jollymore

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 02:41 PM

I have seen this too and thru a freindly comment pass on the benifits of properly relesing all species.trouble typing left hand only surgery on right today.
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#20 striperquest

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Posted 03 August 2011 - 09:47 AM

Some competition for the Rocket Fishing Rod...



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