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Saltwater Licence Coming


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#1 collgan

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 12:53 PM

Consultation on marine recreational fishing licences for eastern Canada

Current status: Open

On May 19, 2017, it was announced that we would consider a new marine recreational licensing system in eastern Canada.

 
Why

There’s general agreement that a licence would help improve stock assessments and promote sustainable management practices. Feedback is required to help with the proposal for a marine recreational fishing licence to identify gaps and provide input and local expertise.

Past actions

Between 2001 and 2005, we explored the possibility of a marine recreational fishing licence for groundfish in parts of Newfoundland and Labrador, and Quebec. In 2016, consultations were held on a proposal to introduce a licence and tags. Discussions have also been held with various groups on the benefits of a licence.

The results of these past actions demonstrate:

  • the importance of recreational fishing to the culture and life of local communities
  • that a licence is seen as a way to ensure that sustainable fishing opportunities continue for future generations of Canadians
Who

This consultation is looking for comments from stakeholders, including:

  • anglers
  • Indigenous groups
  • charter boat operators
  • provincial representatives
What

Some stocks are recovering (cod in Newfoundland and Labrador, striped bass in New Brunswick) and others require special attention (mackerel). Because of this, our proposal indicates that:

  • there would be no requirement to purchase tags
  • the annual licence would cover April 1 to March 31
  • there would be only 1 licence for all marine species
  • initially, the licence could be offered at no cost to anglers
  • it would be available online, with mandatory catch reporting
  • it would have a category for charter boats and for individual anglers
  • clients on charter boats would be covered by the boat licence
  • priority currently given to Indigenous groups for food, social and ceremonial fisheries will remain unchanged
Feedback questions

We want to get your feedback on the following questions.

  1. A decision may be made to eventually apply a fee to the proposed licence. What should the fee entail in terms of levels of fees, categories of licences, timing of implementation or other items of interest?
  2. The licence would initially apply to groundfish, mackerel and striped bass. Are there other marine species that should be included? Are there any concerns about mandatory catch reporting?
  3. On the Pacific coast, the licence is issued online. What type of support would be needed for such a system in eastern Canada? What management conditions should be included on the licence?
  4. Are there any other issues that should be considered?
When and where

Face-to-face consultations will take place at various locations in eastern Canada until July 31, 2017. Dates and locations will be made available below as they’re confirmed.

  • Quebec
  • Nova Scotia on June 29, 2017, from 1 pm to 4pm
    • charter boat operators are invited to the Lewis King Boardroom at 
      the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Dartmouth (1 Challenger Drive)
  • New Brunswick
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
How to participate

If you want to participate in the consultation, you may:

Your feedback will be used to develop options going forward.

Related information Contact us

Attn: Marine Recreational License for Eastern Canada 
Room 13S038 - Fisheries Resource Management
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
200 Kent St
Ottawa ON  K1A 0E6

Email contact: Recfish/[email protected]

website: 

http://www.dfo-mpo.g...rec-mer-eng.htm

 


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#2 Prairiedog Rob

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 06:44 PM

Well I'm from the prairies and had to pay to fish my entire life. If it helps with dfo or stocks or helps in any way, I'm for it....as long as the price is reasonable...
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#3 LiamTheMackerelKing

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 09:24 PM

I have never heard anything about this. It doesn't sound good and there is no need for a saltwater license as far as im concerned
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#4 LiamTheMackerelKing

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 09:27 PM

Also, the mackerel population is good so why are they gonna put in regulations on this????
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#5 collgan

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 06:55 AM

Also, the mackerel population is good so why are they gonna put in regulations on this????

 

The populations is not good:

 

  • The spawning biomass index measured by egg surveys dropped substantially between 1993 and 1998. Following an increase caused by the strong year-class of 1999, the index dropped again to reach historical lows since 2005.
  • In 2009 an additional egg survey was conducted on the Scotian Shelf and the south coast of Newfoundland. Egg densities found during the survey were very low, suggesting that spawning biomass on the Scotian Shelf was not very abundant
  • For the first time, a sequential population analysis was used to assess stock abundance. This analysis indicates that the biomass of the Canadian Atlantic mackerel contingent has been declining since the mid-2000s, reaching a very low value in 2011.
  • This biomass decrease was caused by a lack of recruitment combined with historically higher-than-sustainable fishing mortalities. On two past occasions, biomass decreases associated with large increases in fishing mortality caused the population to decline.

 

http://www.dfo-mpo.g...12_031-eng.html


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#6 John Fishes

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 03:50 PM

Is the impact due to commercial or recreational fishing?  

 

I only keep size macks and I eat what I keep. I also have switched to larger hooks to reduce damage during catch and release. 


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#7 Prairiedog Rob

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 03:20 AM

The populations is not good:

  • The spawning biomass index measured by egg surveys dropped substantially between 1993 and 1998. Following an increase caused by the strong year-class of 1999, the index dropped again to reach historical lows since 2005.
  • In 2009 an additional egg survey was conducted on the Scotian Shelf and the south coast of Newfoundland. Egg densities found during the survey were very low, suggesting that spawning biomass on the Scotian Shelf was not very abundant
  • For the first time, a sequential population analysis was used to assess stock abundance. This analysis indicates that the biomass of the Canadian Atlantic mackerel contingent has been declining since the mid-2000s, reaching a very low value in 2011.
  • This biomass decrease was caused by a lack of recruitment combined with historically higher-than-sustainable fishing mortalities. On two past occasions, biomass decreases associated with large increases in fishing mortality caused the population to decline.

http://www.dfo-mpo.g...12_031-eng.html

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#8 Prairiedog Rob

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 03:22 AM

Thanks for the detailed reply. We need facts not opinion for this concern.
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#9 KBP

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 04:14 AM

I think im okay with this, Its a small price to pay and it only helps officals(dfo) who are obviously underfunded and unable to compete with the amount of negligence and illegal fishing that happens in our province. I just hope the money goes to the right people, and isnt just a cash grab.


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#10 collgan

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 06:15 AM

Is the impact due to commercial or recreational fishing?  

 

I only keep size macks and I eat what I keep. I also have switched to larger hooks to reduce damage during catch and release. 

 

From what I could read its a result of a little bit of everything.  

 

Not managed properly, increased pressure recreational and commercially, changing sea conditions, etc. 


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#11 sable

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 11:45 AM

rec saltwater licence is a great idea. It has been in place in BC for many years. It means there are better fishery stats, more enforcement and makes people think a bit more about the fact that the fishery resources are not just a free for all but need to be conserved.

 

The Canadian mackerel population is in rough shape: the 2014 report shows it at the lowest size ever (http://www.dfo-mpo.g...14_030-eng.html) and things have been getting worse for awhile.

 

For those who may not know, there is a minimum fish size limit on recreational mackerel fishing that recently came into effect: 26.3 cm. http://www.inter.dfo...heries/Pelagics


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#12 John Fishes

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 03:04 PM

I think a big part of the problem on the recreational side is people keeping undersized fish. You can't complain about the tinkers of you don't allow them to grow.


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#13 Golfisher

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 07:27 AM

Along with licensing should come expanded fishing opportunities for recreational anglers. Halibut should be opened up to recreational fishing, as should lobster and crab. Maritime is the only jurisdiction in North America where recreational fishing of these species is prohibited for no reason other than to appease the parochial interest of the commercial fishing industry. If the population of these species is healthy enough to sustain commercial fishing, they should be open to recreational fishing as well.  


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#14 VanW27

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 04:26 PM

I'm with you, if they want to have salt licenses that should also open up the salt water fishing opportunities.
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#15 bigbrat

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 08:35 AM

Along with licensing should come expanded fishing opportunities for recreational anglers. Halibut should be opened up to recreational fishing, as should lobster and crab. Maritime is the only jurisdiction in North America where recreational fishing of these species is prohibited for no reason other than to appease the parochial interest of the commercial fishing industry. If the population of these species is healthy enough to sustain commercial fishing, they should be open to recreational fishing as well.  

I dont think that if one buys a saltwater licence that you should be aloud to catch lobsters,,crabs,,or halibut,,for starters can you picture people being aloud to catch lobsters by just buying a saltwater licence,,the lobster industry would be gone in a matter of a few short years,not everyone but alot of people would be steady trying to catch them,,and im sure the lobster fisherman that pay huge dollars to buy their licence would not let that happen,,im all for a recreational saltwater licence to catch mackeral ,,squid but thats it,,if people want to catch lobsters,,halibut or crabs then you pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to do so


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#16 collgan

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 11:41 AM

Along with licensing should come expanded fishing opportunities for recreational anglers. Halibut should be opened up to recreational fishing, as should lobster and crab. Maritime is the only jurisdiction in North America where recreational fishing of these species is prohibited for no reason other than to appease the parochial interest of the commercial fishing industry. If the population of these species is healthy enough to sustain commercial fishing, they should be open to recreational fishing as well.  

 

Absolutely agree with that.  Obviously recreational harvesters would need to follow the same conservation guidelines and certain limits but there is no reason a rec fishery should not exist. It does on the West Coast of Canada. 

 

I dont think that if one buys a saltwater licence that you should be aloud to catch lobsters,,crabs,,or halibut,,for starters can you picture people being aloud to catch lobsters by just buying a saltwater licence,,the lobster industry would be gone in a matter of a few short years,not everyone but alot of people would be steady trying to catch them,,and im sure the lobster fisherman that pay huge dollars to buy their licence would not let that happen,,im all for a recreational saltwater licence to catch mackeral ,,squid but thats it,,if people want to catch lobsters,,halibut or crabs then you pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to do so

 

I don't feel that would be a concern. The West Coast of Canada has a thriving recreation and commercial fishery that co-exist (salmon, halibut).  Obviously a recreational licence would come with limits...something like each rec fisher is allowed 2 lobster traps (tagged of course) with a daily possession limit of 4 lobsters; and 2 halibut tags per year; and it goes without saying they must follow conservation measures (short, closed areas etc.) Anyone caught outside that would be charged. It would require more of an enforcement presence. 

 

The rec fishery would have little impact on the commercial guys if done properly.  

 

The amount of effort required to fish for halibut and lobster would hardly see droves of nova scotians flocking to the ocean. I think the initial couple years there would be a spike but it would drop off after a while.  It is much like hunting and fishing....everyone can do it (but the majority don't).  Everyone can go fish haddock/flounder/cod now but not that many do. 

 

The key is effective laws and enforcment


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#17 Golfisher

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 11:47 AM

I dont think that if one buys a saltwater licence that you should be aloud to catch lobsters,,crabs,,or halibut,,for starters can you picture people being aloud to catch lobsters by just buying a saltwater licence,,the lobster industry would be gone in a matter of a few short years,not everyone but alot of people would be steady trying to catch them,,and im sure the lobster fisherman that pay huge dollars to buy their licence would not let that happen,,im all for a recreational saltwater licence to catch mackeral ,,squid but thats it,,if people want to catch lobsters,,halibut or crabs then you pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to do so

 

Opening up those species to recreational fishing does not mean a license to plunder the resources. They should have size and bag limits, just as they do in BC and south of the border. As for the commercial fishermen, they pay huge dollars for their licenses because their fishing is industrial in scale, meant to make a living out of it. With prudent measures in place, the amount of resources taken in by recreational fishing will be peanuts compared to the commercial take. Again, I refer to what is the universal standard across all jurisdictions in North America, including on our Pacific coast. In BC, halibut, shrimp, and Dungeness crab provide very important and highly lucrative commercial fisheries, but they all coexist with recreational fishing just fine.

 

Ask yourself this question: why should we not have the same rights as our fellow Canadians do in BC? Expanding saltwater fishing opportunities will also have economic benefits. In BC, and all long the eastern seaboard in the US, recreational saltwater fishing generates a lot of economic activities and income. NS has a great deal of potential, but it's underdeveloped because our fishing opportunities are so limited. 


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#18 Golfisher

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 11:59 AM

I should add: the DFO should also introduce reasonable bag limits for mackerel and squid. Sure they are plentiful, but it boggles my mind that we are allowed to catch and keep unlimited number of mackerel and squid.    


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#19 bigbrat

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 05:37 AM

I should add: the DFO should also introduce reasonable bag limits for mackerel and squid. Sure they are plentiful, but it boggles my mind that we are allowed to catch and keep unlimited number of mackerel and squid.    

even if there was a bag limit on mackeral and squid it wouldnt matter because theres not enough fisheries officers to always keep checking bag limits,,in my 30 plus years of trouting im yet to come across a fisheries officer or DNR in the woods,,and back to the recreational lobster fisherie,,that would never work because the fisherman that make a living from them would make sure that every trap that was found would be smashed,,the natives are setting a limit amount of traps now for years,,not really sure of how many traps they can set but i can tell you that every lobster fisherman that i talk to says the same thing,,they shouldnt be aloud to set traps,,so that being said i can never see a recreational lobster fisherie happening in NS,JMO


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#20 Cuba Libre

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 10:55 PM

Well! My goodness . Finally a realization that you fellow Canadians are being screwed by DFO and the commercial industries.  There is no reason at all that a sport fisherman should not be allowed to take a couple of lobsters home for the family... They DO belong to you guys. Check out these comments from BC    http://www.sportfish...01/#post-837478


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